Tasting History with Max Miller

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

During COVID, without the Pride and social events, a number of us remembered how much we loooove to eat! Looking for a new kinds of recipes? We have just the thing for you…that comes with a side of history. 

On this episode we chat with YouTuber, chef, and soon to be author Max Miller who, on his weekly show “Tasting History with Max Miller,” gives viewers a look at a historical recipe and explores its origins in a fun and thorough way. 

Max is no stranger to the entertainment business; his early start was in musical theatre and voice acting (you must hear his Iago). He would eventually come to work for Disney Studios but, as for many in the film industry, would find himself without a job because of COVID. What was to start as a fun video hobby has turned into a full-time gig, Tasting History’s audience has grown to over hundreds of thousands of subscribers, with millions, double digit millions, of total channel views and counting. Max has been recently featured in major outlets that include Today.com, Digital Trends, the Rachel Ray show, and the New York Post…and a past issue of Metrosource Magazine – now available on Metrosource.com

We chat with him about becoming a YouTube sensation, what goes into making a video, his love of history, and how to maintain a relationship while busy at work as a social media maven. Hosted by Alexander Rodriguez

This is metro source menti, theofficial podcast to metro, source magazine and home of short forminterviews with your favorite personalities from the lght world andbe quick fun and informative. It's metal source on the go out in poinsinet,ni, wa, hello, hello, hello. This is metrohorse minnies, i'm your host alexander rodriguez lead rider for metrists, anavid todcaster during ovid without pride. Without the events, a number ofus remembered how much we love to eat a lot so looking for ways to spice up yourrecipes, we have just the thing for you that comes with a side of history.Today i am chatting with you tuber chef and soon to be author max miller, who,on his weekly, show tasting history with max miller, gives viewers and lookat a historical recipe and explores its origins in a fun and very thoroughway,and maxy is no stranger to the entertainment industry. His early startwas in musical theater and voice. Acting and some day you have to hearhis iago it's fabulous. He would eventually come to work for disneystudios, but as many people in the film industry, he would find himselffurloughed because of coved and what was to start as a fun. Video hobby hasturned into a full time, gig, with benefits tasting history's audience hasgrown to over hundreds of thousands of subscribers with millions double digit.Millions of views and growing every single day max is recently recentlybeen featured in major outlets of include today, com, digital trends, therachel ratio and the new york post. And, of course, we wrote about him in a pastissue of metrofon, which you can read that article at metro souron, pleasewelcome mister max mela. Thank you for having me. I am thoroughly impressedthat you got through all of that without a second take i...

...well, i was amazing the powers of a hangover,you know you're, just kind of like hooted and you're, just like okay, wednesday, alexander it's a wednesday.An no judging any day that ends in the word day is good. For me week days area social construct. My cat doesn't know where the saturday is so. Why should i well, and now you kind of in in chargeof your own business? You know you know very well. There is no day off. Thereis no kind of time. There's no weekend, you are always working towards thebrand, and you know we hear a lot of people say: oh i'm an influencer and wenever say i don okay. Well, and you know true influencers never say i'm aninfluencer, it's like if somebody has to say i'm very classy or i'm veryfunny. Truth is probably not a yeah. Well, i always thought that was kind ofweird too, because if you're an influencer like thatshould be secondary to what you're actually doing that made you be aninfluencer, so tell people that you are a a chef foran actor or a content creator or whatever home you're an influencer orno. I don't like it. I don't like to get it all. So you are a chef who was ayout star. Let's put it that way, but you're actually a yuture star atwhat point? Did you kind of realize that your you tube videos were reallyreally taking off? It was about a year ago, a year ago, last week i had avideo go up and for a few days it did as it usuallydoes. You know three or four hundred views. My friends and family werewatching and then over night, twenty thousand views. Seventy thousandviews a hundred and fifty thousand views, and it hit a million views. Ithink are close to it within that week and i went from a few thousandsubscribers to a hundred and fifty thousand subscribers in five days andthen when i really, though, knew that...

...it was something was when those numbers, those numbers, notnecessarily, but when the subsequent videos kept doing well, because thereare a lot of channels where they'll have a video go viral right, but theydon't know. Why? Necessarily, i still don't knowwhy exactly but but their next video doesn't capture the same audience orwhatever so people. You know that one video is kind of an outlier but andthat one video even for me, is still an outlier, but it kept it kept trekingand moving up so about a month later i was like m. Maybe i got something herewe'll have to say you know my opinion on that. Is it all comes from sincerity?I think videos that people really connect with it has to come from a veryreal place, and so, when somebody has a video that goes viral, i think thetendency is to try super hard and to overdo it for the next one right. Whati love aboutt your channel, because i'm a huge fan, is you have kept thatintegrity? That story telling that personality? You know some of the bellsand whistles have changed, and you know gotten even even better, but the the essence is still the same.We still feel this like intimate relationship that you're like you're,just talking to us about history and having a really good time doing it, butyou've been able to kind of maintain this this energy, but what kind ofpressure does it take for you to to keep looking at the views and thesubscribers? Because now it's actually your business? It's just not like. Ohit's nice to have these followers. This is your business yeah! It's it'sexhausting! You know! I mean it. It's a lot to put out new content, but it isexhausting to follow the view. Count follow the thesubs as they grow, especially because subscribers honestly it's a vanitynumber. It doesn't matter how many subscribers you are. You have, i know,channels with two hundred thousand, but...

...they get a million views on each videoand then i know one with three million subscribers. Getting fifty thousandviews on each video. Well, guess who's actually doing better. I it's all aboutthe views, but it's a vanity number that you stillfollow, because you want that gold plaque or whatever. What's what's disappointing? In my whati find disappointing in myself is that my mood, especially on a tuesday hingeson how well that video that i released that tuesday did- and i try not to letthat happen, but it does, and it's it's just like got to get over it, especially becauseit's not it's not fair to jose my my fiance. It's like i'm going to be in abad mood all day, because that's video didn't do as well as the last view, butyou know this is the reality that thank you for sharing that this is thereality of what people on social media or on you tube have to go through. It'snot not all the glimpse and the glamor, it's not all the fun, and i'm kind wantto talk to you about being furloughed from disney. You know there must havebeen a period of time where it was like. Oh crap. I know a lot of us in theindustry suffer depression and you kind of took that time to kind of reinventyourself on something that you were not doing before. Talking about how youkind of got through that initial news of i'm furlow what next well, it was a complete lock down of ofspending money which i'm so i had actually like,bought the camera and and the microphone before i was furloughed andthank goodness i did because i would not have. I would not have boughtanything once i was furloughed, but it also madeit so for a little while the videos were what do i have in my kitchen, andi will find an old recipe that uses those things, especially because it washard to find most ingredients at the time you know even finding. Flour wasdifficult in those in those first couple months right, but i got ashortage yeah. It was crazy.

I did get quite depressed and my videosdidn't take needly as much work back. Then they were, they were a lot shorter.They were easier. I was always talking about stuff that i already knew about.So there wasn't a lot of research to do, and that left me with a lot of time tosit in my bed and watch british tv all day long. While my fiance was stillworking and after about a month of that, he was kind of like you should really not do that any more, and so i started doing more than onevideo a week for a couple weeks and quickly found out that that wasn'tdoable, but it did get me out of that rut, and i was like i'm going to focuson this, and luckily you know i had unemployment, soi didn't wasn't dying or anything, but it was.It was rough, those first few months forever it was it just yeah. I thinkthe message is, you know, keep going, keep going and if you have a passionyou know don't stop you focus on that passion and when we talk about tastinghistory it actually doesn't come from a passion from from being a cook or achef from like your childhood. It's not like that. Your passion came fromhistory, yeah yeah i mean i don't even think of it as a cooking show, i thinkof it as a history show that has cooking on it. Food is a way into the story for me,because history, if done, i thought well, i think, is all about stories.You know you shouldn't be able to tell a history from a nono from a fictionbook like game of thrones, except for the dragons could basically be history.So that's that's what i've always loved- and i only recently since seven yearsago, got into baking and and kind of made that connection so the history ifeel confident about each week, the cooking i fumble my way through thekitchen. I think that's fun, though, because it kind of challenges like heyo. You know i can do this too, or i can...

...try and just make an attempt and have areally good time now. What is it about history that you love so much, and whatdo you think we can learn by focusing on history? You know i have always loved it,because i've always been able to put myself in the shoes of whateverhistorical person i'm talking about her or reading about orwhatever, and it all started actually from my grandfather, who would tell mestories about his time in world war, two in germany and france, and because he was my grandfather, i couldpicture him in those places granted. I was always picturing him as this.Seventy year old man, you know fighting the right yeah twenty year old man, butthat's what. But at least i was able to make that immediate connection. Itwasn't foreign and i was able i've always been able to take thatconnection to five hundred years ago. Two thousand years ago, it's like i canpicture myself there, and so it's just like reading a choose, your own adventure, but youknow and there's there's just so much of it every there's so much historyyou're never going to run out. So it's i don't know i love it. I just love it exactly what i love about it. Well, no,it's exciting and i think you know we got bored of all the net flix shows-and i think a large number of was myself included,started watching the great documentaries that had been availableto us, even even from the lt q history, but world history, and so i think,there's a younger generation that has been exposed to this, and you know ithink it's very in right now and i think it's so important now take usthrough the creative process of creating a video. How do you choosewhat food to make? How do you do your research and do you do a sample beforeyou put it on camera? Sometimes so it usually starts with arecipe and then i'll find the history after that, it's harder to find historyof a food and then try to find a...

...historic recipe. Because ninety ninepoint, nine percent of foods do not have historic recipes. You know, so itry to start with the recipe and then kind of figure out how to cookit, and sometimes i do full tests. Sometimes i test just little bits andthen- and i start researching- and that's always my favorite part, butit's also the most time consuming part it take twenty or thirty hoursdepending on the topic. But i you know, i usually start with i start withwikipedia, but then that gets into scholarly works. If you go down andfind out, you know where is wikipedia getting its stuff and then thosescholarly works in their bibliography have primary sources actually writingsfrom the ancient romans or whatever, and that's where i always find my gold.Half of my episodes are usually quotes from you know old old authors and thepeople who are actually living the history and that's what i mean by likeputting yourself in their shoes. It's so much easier to do that when you'relistening to their words as opposed to listening to a historian, just talkabout it, and so that's what i really focus on and then i usually will make the very often thatdish. That's in the episode is the first time that i've made it in fulland it's almost always the first time that i've tasted it on camera. The onlytime that i'll taste it beforehand is if it's something that it needs to beeaten within the first five or six minutes that it's out of the oven orwhatever, because by the time i get it to the table and clean everything upand have the camera going and everything it's happen been like threehours, so whatever i'm eating is rather old. At that point you know i couldstick in the microwave, but i usually will have tasted it right when itfinished, and i always have my fiance taste it because his opinions are he'll. Tell you what he thinks andhe'll gladly tell you tell me what i...

...think so i but that's good, it's like no! No, so that's how it goes. What have you tell you what i also loveabout watching your videos? Is i love reading the comments in in each video,because people will talk about their own recipes from their own familyregion depending on what region you're? Focusing on or scholars in a verycertain region that you're talking about or acertain part of history will also chime in and it becomes this conversationwith your fans with each other about history and family stories in tradition,and so that's equally as exciting for me, and so a little bird told me you'reactually working on a cookbook, i am yeah. I have a cookbook, it's going tobe published by simon and shuster, i'm working on. Writing it. Now and it'syou know it takes so long, not just to write it, but even once it's done toget it published is like takes like a year. So it's going to be a littlewhilebefore. It hits shelves, but it's so exciting. Just to you know thinkthat even even when i'm done with you tube and there will be a book- and youknow that can't be taken away from me- so that's going to then the tv show isgoing to follow and then you know the movie. Who would you cast as you in your movie? Oh gosh, i don't know a young brad pit.Can i can i choose a young bread year, zack fron i'll, take zack effort thereyou go an just now that yep yep y have an any asansol. Let's talk a littleabout about your relationship, you know your channel didn't start out and itisn't it's not a gay show it's not a gate channel per se, and i think that'sthe conversation that we're really getting in in today's day and age is,you know, being gay is a part of our full puzzle. You know where so manythings...

...just like you're, not an influence orfirst your a chef first, and so what i love about. That is that, yes, you area part of the lgota you're, a spokesmen for a community, because you live yourlife and you share your relationship. You share moments with your fiance, butwe know how many hours this takes, and we know now like with the media thatyou're doing and now working on a cookbook. How does this play with yourrelationship? Because your time is very different? The stress you're under isvery different. So how? How do you maintain a healthyrelationship? Well, keeping up this this busy job, i mean he's, he i mean he's also reallybusy, but i also think he's extremely understanding of like when i can't doanything or when i'm just too tired or whatever, but every single night. Evenif it's just for forty five minutes before i go to bed, we sit down, watchtv together, and it's just that. You know even that quick bit of timetogether is always fun, but he also contributes to the channel. Not so much in like he's, not writingor editing it, but he he works on doing comments and the set idle and those those littlethings there he's part of the conversation and people know him. Sothe channel has kind of pickup a little bit. It is our relationship in a way, probably not healthy, but then there'salso. We have like made a concerted effort this weekend, we're going toseattle for a few days were made a concerned effort to once a month or so take two or threedays away from the channel away from home, and you know have time: that's not tasting history. I thinkthat's so important and even you know, for those solo content creators outthere even just taking time to yourself. You know if you're, not in arelationship, it's so important to not...

...lose that that aspect, because you canget wrapped up. You know in this job and then you know you're just exhaustedand mentally drained. But i love to see about you and jose is the support youhave for each other. You know the comments on each other social media,the little gifts that you give each other a d and just really being therefor each other. It's very heart! Warming! Now, what kind of food are yougoing to be serving at the wedding? Well, it's all going to depend onwhat's open, so we're going to hawaii for the wedding and right now you stillcan't have more than i think it's six people at like a table at a restaurant,so we were going to do a restaurant and maybe we still will- and in that case iwant kind of like traditional hawaiian food, because that's what i like thatand we're going to be in hawaii. But if we end up having to like do a cateredthing, an big arbab there only twenty of us- then i don't know what it'sgoing to be, but probably hawaii. It's not going to it's not going to beanything like historical other than they've been making a certain dish forhundreds of years or whatever. Nobody e wants that at their way. Well, just so you know max, i am a redstar to fish shit, oh baby, all right! This one is for social media.What is the easiest kind of recipe to do with a good story that somebody like me could serve on afirst date and impress somebody but still be able to do it when you said still be able to do it? Iwasn't exactly sure what yo no chipola sillaba syllabub is the answer. It'sthe easiest thing that i've ever made on the channel, and it's one of myfavorites, it's basically just whipped cream with alcohol in it is reallypopular in the sixteen d, seventeen hundreds, i mean alcoholic quip creamand you can kind of flavor it. However,...

...you want and put different alcohols,whether it's sherry or other wine or port, or have had people make it withsake and so ju, it's versatile and delicious and super easy and you canmake it in like eight minutes. I love that i'm going to do that. You know nowthat we're dating again, i'm definitely going to do that max. I love chatting with you everymoment i get, and you know i just love watching your channel to see that thechannel just grow and all the different kinds of foods and people that you'retalking about. It's definitely a learning experience for me. So thankyou so much for sharing that with the world. Thank you. A tetter tell everybodywhere you want them to find you and follow you youtman history is whereyou're going to see all my stuff, but i'm also pretty active on instartasting history with max miller. Thank you. Thank you. So much and happy prideby the way. Thank you. Yes, it's almost over yeah telling the or tell him say i said hello. I absolutelywill thank you so much. Thank that has been my chat with max miller.Like i said i just love chatting with him. You can read my in depth chat withhim at natra source com, and he actually has that recipe there as well.So anybody can do it and that's our episode, i'm your host and lead riderfor metro source magazine, alexina rodriguez. You can follow me on insaraat alex ander s on the air until next time stay true, and do you brook that has been another mesosaurs. Manylike share subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latestissue of metro corse magazine on new stands or online at messrs com. Followus on face book in stagra at these sort and on clattered. Let a course manuntil next time, a a.

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