Celebrating Sondheim with Travis Moser

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In his attempt to fulfill an unquenchable need for attention, cabaret, concert and recording artist Travis Moser has packed houses and won acclaim for his solo shows in NYC and around the country. He has celebrated and performed shows devoted to Linda Ronstandt and the music of Rodgers and Hart. He has performed at the famed Metropolitan Room, Joe’s Pub, Club Cumming, Birdland, The Laurie Beechman Theatre, Don’t Tell Mama, The Duplex and of course, the legendary Feinstein's at 54 Below where he has recorded live albums of his performances.  

He has been seen in regional productions of Jekyll and Hyde, West Side Story, Into the Woods, The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Joseph in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and featured soloist in Disney and More.

His latest project, recorded during COVID, is a quieter version of Travis with an unplugged celebration of the music of Stephen Sondheim – titled So Many People: The Stephen Sondheim Sessions.

We chatted with Travis about cabaret during COVID, the power of the music of Stephen Sondheim, dissected Into the Woods, and being in the spotlight. Tune in!  

This is metro source minis, theofficial podcast to Metro source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favoritepersonalities from the lgbtq world and beyond. Quick, Fun and informative. It'smetro source on the go, out in pround since one thousand nine hundred andninety. Well, hello, hello, hello, this is metro source minis. I'm your host, lead writer for Metro source and Avid Podcaster, AlexanderRodriguez. Today we celebrate a little covid music with a sondheim celebration with performerTravis Moser, in his attempt to fulfill an unquenchable need for attention, don'twe all? Cabaret, concert and recording artist Travis Moser has packed houses andone a claim for his solo shows in New York City and around the country. Yes, celebrated and performed shows devoted to Linda rotstead and the music ofRogers and heart. He's performed at the fame metropolitan room, Joe's pub club, coming Birdland, the Lori beachman theater, don't tell Mama, the duplex and, of course, the legendary fine Stein's at fifty four below, wherehas recorded live albums of his performances. He has been seen in the regionalproductions of Jacqueline, hide, west side, story into the woods, the mysteryof Edwin drude and Joseph in emosy, technicolor dreamcoat, and he's been featuredsoloist in Disney and more. And his latest project, recorded during covidis a quieter version of Travis with an unplugged celebration of the music of StephenSondheim, titled So many people, the Stephen Sondheim sessions. We featured himon Metrosourcecom. Please welcome Travis Moser. Thank you so much. Yeah,of course, of course. Okay, so I just have to know why. Stephen Sondheim. I noticed that during the pandemic, during quarantine, wheneverything got shut down, I was listening to from music, trying to findsongs that kind of was representing in my...

...mind when I was going for arun or a walk or whatever, that was representing kind of how I wasfeeling different moods with friends, with family, with politics and a lot of timesand just like getting through each day, and I noticed that a lot ofthe songs that were coming up for me were either the lyrics or thesongs themselves of Stephen Sondheim, and so I started thinking of an idea ofkind of putting together a song cycle of songs that kind of represented, fromstart to finish, how I was feeling about various things during during quarantine,during the first, like say, six or seven months of quarantine. Andso in my mind I kind of was thinking of these songs then putting themtogether in order of kind of how I was feeling and where I was inthe you know, Pandy Choir of it all. And and that's kind of, you know, where it came from. It was just that those were thelyrics and the songs that are kind of speaking to me about my feelingsduring during the quarantine. Well, Covid has certainly been a reflective time forus, and what I love as a musical theater buff myself and as aSondheim a Fifthionado, I love that you just didn't do, you know,what we would expect from like a best of Stephen Sondheim, where it's allthe wellknown songs. I'm you include some lesserknown songs which I was like,Oh yeah, that song, and it kind of took me back to kindof restudy his music and look at his lyrics again. So I want youropinion as a fellow musical theater buff. Do you think, with all ofthe new modern sounds on Broadway, that Stephen Sondheim's music and his and hisworks are in danger, I've been brushed back into like the dusty vaults ofmusical theater? Yeah, I mean I don't think so ultimately, because Ithink that the lyrics in the music themselves are so raw and honest and theywere so ahead of their time when they originally came out in the in thein the shows and the musicals that they...

...are from, and so I thinkthat that honesty and that like Rawness, like they were considered like, youknow, almost like depressing at the time that they came out because they werejust they weren't Oklahoma, they weren't that kind of thing. So I thinkthat aspect of it make will make them kind of, you know, stay. But you know, the thing that, and I think you and I talkedabout, is kind of like the the you know, all the Americanidol belting of Broadway now and it doesn't lend itself so much to son Time'smusic because it's all about the feelings getting that the idea cross as opposed tokind of showing how well you can sing. And but ultimately I think that,you know, I've been seeing, you know, I did, youknow, stripped down versions of son time, but I've been seeing, you know, soandtime reinterpreted in so many different ways through, you know, likebilly porter's recent Broadway solo album and all kinds of different people that are doingreinterpretations. I don't think there's any particular wrong way to do it. Itturends on your voice and how you perform and whatnot. So I do thinkthat they'll kind of stand the test of time. I mean we're still,you know, right before lockdown we were talking about, you know, thethe Amlto Staunton Gypsy transferring to Broadway from London, and there's always talk ofa revival of one of Stevens sometimes shows. So I think that we're going tofind new ways of doing them, like whenever the Sweeney Todd with Paylapone and everyone playing the instruments of the John Doyle from around. I thinkwe're gonna we're going to find new ways of doing it. And because thelyrics are so, you know, such a Gut Punch and really are,like I said, run off and honest I think that they will ultimately alwayssurvive. It'll just be a way of trying to reinterpret and do it ina way that is going to appeal to contemporary audiences. But, like Isaid, I've been seeing so many interpretations of different songs and that's another thing. That another reason why I kind of wanted to do this in a morestripped down kind of way, because I...

...think we've seen the kind of thingwe're seeing now, is are all these, you know, totally different interpretations,like in different, you know, musical styles and whatnot. So Ithink that we've done a lot of that. So I'm I was looking more tostrip it down to its bare bones of, you know, the musicand the lyrics. So I do think that it'll stick around. I'll justbe a evolution. You know, in my mind he's kind of a modernday shakespeare where the language, you know, people say, Oh my God,his lyrics are so much and as a performer, we know. Imean, you done into the woods. You had to memorize that that fast. You know your fault and it's like, Oh my God, there's so manywords but really just like the language of Shakespeare, you know, it'skind of flowery, but it has so much meaning and it's constantly, evenin today's age, being looked at again and reinterpreted. And it's funny thatwe're going to be celebrating the thirty anniversary of assassins, which we know isStephen Sondheim's controversial piece, and they're getting together some of the original cast membersand that show in particular, I'm talking about and almost glorifying the assassination attemptson our president. And then we come out of this administration and into anew administration where we're talking about the roles of presidents and how people are reactingand how people are incited to do certain things. It. You know,it's all fresh again, and so, just like you said, this musicalhas relevance and not only is a music just beautiful, but it's like adefinite comment as to what we're going through as a nation. Now. Youhave performed jacket into the woods and we know all of our friends have doneinto the woods a million times. We've done into the woods a million times. I mean we always have to go see a production like every month.was like, Oh okay, we've sat through that show how many times,we've listened to the the recording, how many times? But playing Jack,how did you make the roll your own,...

...especially, like I said, whenwe've seen it presented so many times and we kind of know what audiencesexpect and what we even expect ourselves as an actor? How what's that createdprocess for you, taking on such a wellknown role? Yeah, I thinkthat it's just a matter of I mean, as simple as it sounds, itjust coming from your perspective. I mean like, you know, comingespecially you know, Jack isn't written like obviously is like a queer character,but you know, coming from he's he feels kind of easy as kind ofisolated. He seems kind of, you know, like he doesn't fit in, and I think that that's part of it. But I think you cantake like you can take that from your life as as a as a queerperson, and kind of use that and also sometimes, I think it's beendone, not in a bad way, just a different interpretation, is thathe's he's kind of like, you know, totally dumb, and the comedy comesfrom like how dumb he is, and I think that you can comefrom like a little bit of a place of like, you know, likeat that age was when you're younger. You're coming from a more naive placebecause you haven't seen the world, and that is, you know, partof the song of giants in the sky, him realizing, you know, growingup. You know, they say it's, you know, you know, like allegory for for going through puberty or whatnot. But I think thatif you come from like a more just like wide eyed, like naive tothe world, but actually Jack is pretty smart and he's trying to forge awayfrom himself, I think it creates kind of a different version at the character. I think a lot of times when I see it done, it's likepeople, it's easy to go for the you know, he's just like atotal idiot and a total like sometimes, you know, like a like akind of like straight guy bro kind of stupid. Yeah, way of doingit. And I feel like if you come from like a queer perspective oflike kind of being on the outside and just being totally new to a worldthat you know nothing about, as opposed to stupid, it's more just likelike you just haven't had the life experience,...

I think you can kind of makeit your own. I love that, that perspective on it, because whatI've always gotten from that character, and I hate went into the woods, is presented as so ondimensional. It's like, let's play everything for thelaughs. You don't play everything for the last because then you're going to you'regoing to miss the meat of it. What I've always been drawn to thatcharacter is I'm a mom's boy and I you know, Jack is a mom'sboy too. What I think is he's motivated by so much love. Hislove for Milky White comes from a very sweet, since here place, andthen he goes through all this process to help his mom, you know,with money and how to better their lives together, and he loves his momso much and so when he loses her, I find that so devastating and it'susually a point that's just kind of brushed aside. And so I seeeverything that he does comes from a place of love and I do respond tothat kind of queer sensibility that he comes from, where he is alone andhe has an attachment to his mom and he likes pretty things. Weird pointthat that's exactly right, because it's like coming from that place of love andkind of like that's where his like struggle comes from. He loves his mom, he loves where he is, he loves Milky White. Everything kind ofcomes from that place. And you're right, that guy. That kind of islike secondary. It's almost like he's so stupid that he says here,does this the other thing, but it's like it really comes from his internalstruggle, comes from like when you say with his mom wanting milky white.You know, like not really understand it, not have you know, having experiencethe world in this way. So yeah, I totally agree. Andgoing back to your point about assassins, to which was I I totally agreewith that as well, because I think a lot of these sometimes songs andshows were written to convey a certain thing at the time, but like,just like assassins, like you were saying, that was a great point. It'slike they take on their so well written. It is like Shakespeare,and you want to see other people interpreting these works. Just like Shakespeare.It's they take on a totally new meaning for our time, with each differentgenerations, or they're written for one thing...

...and they take on a totally otherthing in the written a way that they're not dated, they're just very kindof like general. So I think that's another reason. That was a reallygood point about assassins and how that's fitting in with, you know, kindof our clip current political landscape. So it's so I think that's a greatpoint in another reason why they'll stick around. And Travis, I want to talkabout again your interpretations. You have honored musicians like I mentioned Linda Rodstatand Rodgers and heart. You pay a monster them, but the music isstill very much your own. I get your sense coming out from it.What are the most important factors a singer must remember when honoring a musician whenwith a focus type shows? We've all sat through cabarets that have not beenthe best, so you coming from doing them successfully. What do you thinka singers really need to remember when presenting a one person show? Well,I think that you have to have kind of obviously like a through line ofwhat you're trying to get across. Is it that you want to show whata like? For example, the Landa Ran said show, my goal wasto show what a wide breath of material and genres she covered and all thethings she you know she did and why she kept striving to do different things. So in that show in particular, my goal was to always come atit from your perspective. So don't try to sing it like Linda Ron said, don't try to sing it like whoever sing it like you. Bring youto it, bring new arrangements. I think when you're doing a solo showand you're trying to honor someone by just doing the songs you know and nottrying to put your own spin on it is the wrong thing to do.So for the Linda Rons, for example, I wanted to create kind of cabaretBroadway type the fit my voice arrangements that were new arrangements, new tempos, sing them in my style, but show the wide breath of you know, what Linda Ron said had done,...

...you know, in terms of pop, rock, country, traditional Mexican songs, just, you know, Broadway,Gilbert and Sullivan, and end up taking all of those and coming atit from my perspective, how I sing, how my musical director that I workwith does arrangements, but kind of giving a nod to them and showingthe audience kind of what they're doing with stories along the way, but comingout from your perspective in your voice. I think is the best way becauseI you see a lot of those shows where they're trying to to kind ofimitate exactly, you know, Linda Ron, sad or, Rogers and heart,you know music from that era, and to me it's about I wantto show you something different in terms of these arrangements in the lamb, singingthem, but I want to also honor them. So not taking them ina totally crazy direction, but I just wanted to be different enough. Sothat's my stamp. But gives a nod to the person and then shows kindof like their life and their work. So I think just coming from youand making it different, like you're like you're creating a brand new show ofyour own music, what you would do with it, what you would doit through arrangements, and then commenting on the artist. That's why I lovepeople like Justin Vivian Bond. You know, whenever they're they're always doing you know, like not tributes, but like kind of like covers of some ofthe songs that they love so much, and it's in their way. I'mseeing Justin Vivian bond through the UN seeing this person, Judy Collins, forexample, through the Lens of Justin Vivian Bond, and I think that's whatcan make a really great, kind of interesting moment. So let's talk aboutso many people. Like we mentioned, it's kind of a stripped down version. It's you on a piano, not recorded in front of a live audience, which I love your albums that are because it has this energy. Weget to hear a little bit of your banter and it has a totally differentenergy. Was this totally terrifying because it's very naked in a certain way?was just terrifying to record number one and...

...number two to kind of release tothe world? Yeah, a little bit, just because it's like, because it'son time and you know the phrasing and the lyrics and everything. Notthat all composers and lyrics and aren't you want to honor their work, butwith some ontime there's an extra level of anxiety to, you know, honorthe lyrics, because it's like poetry, it's like Shakespeare, it's like ourmodern day, like you said, and so there's that, there's that pressureof doing the creating your own phrasing and doing the songs in your way,honoring the lyrics. Getting his point across. You know, there's always with withwith singers, it's always like, you know, you want to provelike that you're a good singer, how good you saying, Oh, hi, you can sing and whatnot. But with sometime I think it's like reallyabout serving the songs and what he's trying to say. It's a IT'S Ait's a story and an idea. So it was, you know, prettyscary just because it was just me and piano in the studio. I wasI was in the recording studio and and you know, you want to makesure you're getting every single a and the right you're wanting to get the phrasingright so that so that the breath is in the right place, because youknow he has a very specific way of talking and laying out, you know, what he wants to say. So that was scary. And then,because it's so raw and vulnerable and because run a time of quarantine when we'renot really seeing anybody and and I can't perform live, I can't do thesesongs in front of an audience, you know, it feels very like nakedand vulnerable and like you're kind of putting out something like a naked picture ofyourself. Yeah, very much through. Yeah, exactly, with this,with this music. So, you know, stripping something down, especially with acan like a composer, lyricist like Sun time, is always scary andyou feel like, you know, I'm a fraud, I'm a fake,you know, like like you know, whenever you put something out like this, just because it is someone that's so...

...laud and this year is his ninetybirthday. So we saw the you know, the the tribute kind of show towardsthe beginning of the the pandemic, and you know, you just wantto on or you know him and what he does and you know you don't. You know how judgmental everybody can be about his stuff. Oh, yes, definitely scary. What's funny because even he can be judgmental about his stuffas well. You know, we joke about needing attention and I'm right therewith you, and there's nothing, there's nothing bad with that, especially ifyou admit it and especially if you're putting out great content that people are respondingto. There's no there's no bad element to that and being aware. Buthow has covid played with that part of your psyche? We're not getting attentionfrom audiences in front of us. How has that made you kind of adjust, you're thinking, on performances, career and even your personal life. Yeah, it's I mean, just like everybody else, has been really, reallytough. And it's so funny that you say that about like, you know, everybody wants attention, especially if you're a performer, you're putting something out. It just is Heli I love to just like like broadly like kind ofjoke about it because, like we all love attention and of course, likeI love, you know, likes and attention and whatnot and performing. Butit's funny to me like that whenever you see on social media like people thatare like putting out things, but in this like though, like humble way, and to me it's like you all doings in Boling in certain tys likefunny. So it's like to me it's like funny to have like kind oflike an alter ego that's like totally like like you know, like like hungryfor attention and like and and what not. It's like I just think that thebeing funny about it being kind of like overthetop about your yeah, andis can be really fun because I just get really exhausted by the people thatare pretending that they don't want attention, but they put an album out orthey're in a show. It's like. So to me it's like, youknow, during the pandemic it's been really tough because, you know, Iwork in theater as for you know,...

...my job, and also, youknow, I'm a performer, recording artist, so there's a lot of performing,whether it's in front of, you know, producer clients and beatings,whether it's in on a stage that you don't get that. So it's likeI noticed myself like towards the beginning of the pandemic like kind of like goingknots on Instagram or instagram stories. It's like it's like you need that connection, and it's not even so much about like all the time like look atme, it just is like, when you're a performer, somebody that's youknow, I'm also an only child, so it's like like makes I loveonly children. But so it's like so it's like, you know, likethat validation. It's like it, you know, to be like for anyperformer or anybody who who's doing anything creative, it's, you know, in thiskind of arena. It's so tough to just be locking your apartment,especially in you know, I live in New York City, so you knowI live in a small apartment in your you don't see anybody. It's justyou know, it does rek havoc on your part. Of Your identity isyour voice, your performance, how you are in front of peeple and whatnot. If that's all stripped away, it does make you think like, youknow, who am I, what am I? What am I and thepeople, because you know, I put a lot of stock on people beinglike he's the singer, he's the performer, he does this, and if youtake all of that away, it's like, you know, it bringsup a lot of questions about who you are because you know you don't havethat and I think a lot of people are asking who they are and whatnot. But it's a different level. I think if your if your identity istied to being, you know, a public person or a performer or apodcast or whatever it is, you know, when that's taken away, it doesmake you really questionin you know, like if this was all take away, who am I? What does it make me? So it does,you know, it has reaked havoc on the old psyche. I, let'ssay well, and I totally agree with you, not to be dramatic oranything. I've taken. It's like not how many podcast episodes or how manyarticles I've written in my leaving behind,...

...but what legacy am I leaving behindfor for the people of around me? What real legacy in terms of compassionrelationships have I created and will will I leave behind, rather than just froma professional point of view? Okay, I have to know. What isyour backstage ritual before a performance? Do you go? Do have like acertain steps that you have to do, or do you just kind of showup and enjoy it? What kind of backstage performer are you? Well,I'm filled to the Brim with anxiety at all times, so I'm not thekind of performer that, like you know, I do shows with a lot ofpeople, like there's a show called love bites at Joe's that we doat Joe's pub, at the public theater, and everybody you know, like Justntvan Bon bond was actually in that, I think one year, and Michaelmust own and people like that, these gregorious type. Yeah, well, and what the and, like you know, people are backstage like this, that and the other, like Chit Chatting. I am someone that needsto be like totally focused. I don't want to Chit Chat with you.I want to kind of be in my own little area. I don't reallylike to eat anything before I perform some star and then and I like tohave a snacks, whatever I have. You know, I usually like likejust because user backstage don't access to a bar if it's somewhere like that.So I always have a bottle of makers, like a little bottle of makers.And Yeah, and I'm always like getting my die cooke, pouring someof it out and putting some of the the maker's mark in there. Ialways have to. I always go on with like like, not always,but I like to go on with like a drink to just like loose up, because my anxiety is so at a ten and I'm like so focused ondoing a good job and whatnot that it's like if I just let leave myselfto my own drothers, it's like I'm too in my head and whatnot.So it's like I like to focus. I like to have a little drink. Very, you know, stritchy and backstage and and you know, thenwhen I'm done I can like relax watch everything else's performances. I love togo out and, you know, watch everybody else, but beforehand I liketo like not talk to anybody, really...

...not eat much before I perform,have a drink, focus on what I'm doing, trying to like think ofthe lyrics, make sure I have those in order and whatnot, and justkind of pretend backstage then this like free loving person that like well, youknow, is into talking to everybody and kind of like going my own littlecorn or have my drink and and get ready to go on stage. I'mso with with you there. I don't like people coming up to talk tome. I you know, I'm glad friends are there, but I don'twant to coming backstage before the show and an hour before. I have perfectedit, that I have it down to a science, that it's two whitewines before I hit the stage, no less and no more, because Irelaxed and then, you know, I can kind of my head voice justkind of opens up, but anymore and then I'm flashing around exact any lessthan it's just makes me anxious, like yeah, that's that's the thing aboutlike it being an anxious performer. Some people could just like love to justlike come in five minutes before go right on stage. For I'm not thatperson. I like that purple too much. I'm like starting honey noon, gettingready. Yet it's crazy, but like, but like, but,like you said, it's like, after after years and years perform, youcan perfect how much alcohol and when to drink it, and that's very correct. I'll musing like one makers and diet a half an hour before I goon, and then if the order gets changed, you're like, you're basicallyscrewed, because then you're like, like yet whole you're holding is getting thattime down. And another rule I have with myself is before I used totry to like have all the sheet music and all the lyrics typed up sothat I would they would be like right on the tip of my tongue,but I found that it would actually psych me out and my brain would wouldmake me think that I had lost all the lyrics because I was trying tofocus a half hour before. So an hour before I don't even think aboutthe music, and that's helped, because I've hit the stage not remembering thefirst line because I psyched myself out. You guys sound exactly a like interms of like performing, because it's like...

...it's this love of anxiety where I'malmost doing like magical thinking of like I have to do this, I haveto do this at this time, and it's like and it does get inyour head and then you like like to your point, you're like overprepared tothe point where you're like psyching yourself out. That's exactly right. Wait, Ithought it was that. And then you're finding things that you didn't eventhink about before and they are like all in your head. It's yeah,it's crazy, yeah, but we know once you hit the stage the magichappens. Okay, we're going to play a little rapid fire. Are youready? Yes, if you had to perform one song for Stephen Sondheim inhis living room, what song would it be? Probably what can you lose, because I think that is one of his most underrated songs. I youknow, it's not recorded a lot solo. It's I just think that that's oneof his best songs. It's simple, you know, like a man ora woman can sing it. Of A sing by song by both aman and a woman in the movie. I just think it's it's such agreat song and now when that he probably is stick up in auditions. Yeah, yeah, what sometime character would you love to see a spinoff musical for? Oh my God, that's such a great question. I think maybe Carlottafrom folly's because I'm so here, is one of my favorite songs of alltime and I'd love to see her trajectory, what she does, because she's oneof those survivor performers, like you know, they don't. We don'thave them so much anymore. Is that, even though not the biggest fan ofher, like Marie Osmond, for examp up, was one of thosesurvivors. She's on a variety show, she's on Broadway, to like thesepeople that just like constantly do the next thing. And so to me Carlottawould be, you know, like, what's her next act? You'd beon QBC. Probably. That's funny. What does it guilty pleasure song onyour playlist doesn't have to be musical theater, but a song that you're so embarrassedby but you love. Let me think about that one. Seez forme, I'm not one that subscribes too...

...much a guilty pleasures. I thinkthat like if something like Frand Lee would said this recently in pretended to cityon Netflix, but it's like yeah, if something gives you pleasure, there'sso much harsh reality in the world. There's something, he's your pleasure.It's not guilty, it just is simply pleasure. I mean, I'm tryingto think, like what is it? So now as I think, I'dbe embarrassed, you know, my spotify, your end list or whatever, withlike with like, you know, like some days I'll get in arabbit hole of listening to like bad musicals like Jecko and hide or something,and I listened to like one song from every cast album like in a row, and it makes me look good, absolute psychopath. I might listen tolike pop, someone like you, when Edder, someone like like I'm goingdown the listeners of you lie, to that too. Yeah, and it'slike you, because I want to hear the differences. I wouldn't, Ohmy God, try. I'm exactly and if there's a remix of it,I'm sold, like I'll own every single remix of the so funny apple musicthing and they'll see like just oud musical, you know, you know, likethe ones that are considered, quote unquote, guilty pleasure. Jackman hasthe first one that came to mind. But like, and you'll see,like every versions, everyone recorded in a row and it looks like I'm beensitting in my room, like in a corner, like in a fatal tractionduring the lights, rocking with these different versions over. Oh, I loveit. And what would the name of the musical based on your life be? Let's call it I'm still here. Got It, got it. Ilove it all right, Travis, tell everybody where you want them to findyou and follow you. You can find me on Instagram at Trap James Oninstagram. You can find me on my official website, Travis mosercom. Youcan search for me. My album, singles, whatnot. Are Available onApple Music, spotify, itunes, anywhere you listen to music or purchase music, Amazon and twitter at TJ Moser. I love it so much. Andif I was going to what's the first track that somebody that might not befamiliar with? Sometime, what's the first track on so many people your latestalbum that they should listen to first?...

I think that the first on Broadwaybaby is a great intro into Stephen Sondheim because it's one of his most accessiblesongs, I think one of the most like typical Broadway songs. But ithas that, but it has that slight sound, time hard edge of somebodyreally pounding the pavement and it kind of not happening for them. And duringthis kind of of Covid I think we can all relate to really try tomake something happen and hoping and looking towards the future and just having that hopeand fade that's going to happen before it's even happen, whether it's getting outof the pandemic, whether it's getting a job. So I think that Broadwaybaby, if you listen to that, the first song on the on theEP, that's that'll give you a great insurance us on time. Travis,it has been a delight to chat with you, it's delight to listen toyour music and I cannot wait to see what the future has. Thank youso much for having me. I love all of your shows and I lovemeeting other only child. Yeah, we got to talk about what's Covid isover. We have a lot we're going to get together. We're going tobe the ladies who lunch and we're did I love it. Thank you,Travis so much. Thank you. That has been my chat with Travis Moser. You can read my in depth interview with him at Metro Sourcecom. Andthat is your episode. I'm your host, Alexander Rodriguez. You can find meon Instagram at Alexander is on air. Until next time, stay true anddo you boo. That has been another metal source mini like. Shareand subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latest issue of MetroSports magazine on newstands or online at Metro sportscom. Follow us on Facebook,instagram at metal source and on twitter at Letro course mad until next time,he fast.

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