Celebrating Sondheim with Travis Moser

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In his attempt to fulfill an unquenchable need for attention, cabaret, concert and recording artist Travis Moser has packed houses and won acclaim for his solo shows in NYC and around the country. He has celebrated and performed shows devoted to Linda Ronstandt and the music of Rodgers and Hart. He has performed at the famed Metropolitan Room, Joe’s Pub, Club Cumming, Birdland, The Laurie Beechman Theatre, Don’t Tell Mama, The Duplex and of course, the legendary Feinstein's at 54 Below where he has recorded live albums of his performances.  

He has been seen in regional productions of Jekyll and Hyde, West Side Story, Into the Woods, The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Joseph in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and featured soloist in Disney and More.

His latest project, recorded during COVID, is a quieter version of Travis with an unplugged celebration of the music of Stephen Sondheim – titled So Many People: The Stephen Sondheim Sessions.

We chatted with Travis about cabaret during COVID, the power of the music of Stephen Sondheim, dissected Into the Woods, and being in the spotlight. Tune in!  

This is Metrosourcementis the officialpodcast to metrosourte magazine and home of short form interviews with yourfavorite personalities from the lgvtq world and beyond quick fun andinformative. It's metrol source on the go out in cousene Mak. Well, hello, hello, Hello! This isMetro Horse Minnis. I wer host lead rider for metrosourts and Avodpodcaster Alexanda Rodrigez. Today we celebrate a little coved music with asanheim celebration with performer Travis Moser. In his attempt to fulfilan unquenchable need for attention. Don't we all CAPARA concert andrecording artist? Havis Moser has packed houses and wont to claim forHissolo shows in New York City and around the country. He a celebrated andperformd shows devoted to Linda Rodstan and the music of Rogers and Hart he'sperformed at the fame metropolitan room. JOES POB club, combing Berdlan, theLorri beachman theater, don't tell Moma the duplex and of course, the legendaryfine sines at fifty four below, where has recorded, live albums of hisperformances. He has been seen in the regional productions of CECKELIN hidewestside story into the woods. The mystery of Edwin drewn and Joseph inemosing, technic, color, Dream Code and he's been featured soloist in Disneyand more and his lagest project recorded during covid is a quieterversion of Travis. With an unpluged celebration of the music of StevenSonreim titled, So many people, the Steven Sonheim sessions, we featuredhim on Metrosourcecom. Please welcome. Try this Moser yeah, of course, of course, okay. So Ijust have to know why Steven Sonhim, I noticed that during the pandemicduring quarantine, when everything got shut down, I was listening to formmusic trying to find songs. That kind of was representing in my mind when Iwas going for run or a walk or whatever.

That was representing kind of how I wasfeeling different: Moods with friends, with family with politics and a lot oftimes and just like getting through each day, and I noticed that a lot ofthe songs that were coming up for me were either thelyrics or the songs themselves of Steven Santime. And so I startedthinking of an idea of kind of putting together a song cycle of songs. That kind of represented from start to finish, how I was feelingabout various things during during quarantine during the first like, say,six or seven months of quarantine, and so in my mind I kind of was thinking ofthese hongs than putting them together in order of kind of how I was feelingand where I was in the you know: Pandi Quar of it all and- and that's kind of you know where itcame from. It was just that those were the lyrics and the songs that were kindof speaking to me about my feelings during during thequaraentine. Well, Covit has certainly been a reflectede time for so what Ilove is a musical theater, buff myself and as a Sonheim, a FICINATO. I lovethat you just didn't. Do you know what we would expect from like a best ofSteven Sanheim, where it's all the well known songs? I ou include some lesserknown, songs, which I was like: Oh yeah, that song and it kind of, took me backto kind of restudy his music and look at his lyrics again. So I want youropinion as a fellow musical theater bove. Do you think, with all of the newmodern sounds on Broadway, that Steven Sonheim's music and his and his worksare in danger of being brushed back into like the dusty vaults of musicaltheater yeah? I mean I don't think so, ultimately, because Ithink that the lyrics and the music themselves areso raw and honest, and they were so ahead of their time when theyoriginally came out n, the in the in the shows and the musicals that theywere from, and so I think that that...

...honesty and that, like rawness likethey were considered, like you know, almost like depressing at the time thatthey came out because they were just they weren't Oklahoma. They weren'tthat kindofting. So I that aspect of it make will make them kind of you knowstay. But you know the thing that- and I think you and I talked about- is kind of like the the you know, the American idol beltingof Broadway now and it doesn't lend itself so much to sontimes music,because it's all about the feelings getting t the idea crossas opposed to kind of showing how well you can sing and but ultimately, Ithink that you know I've been seeing. You know I did. You know, strip downversions of Sontim, but I've been seeing. You know sontime reinterpretedin so many different ways through you know like billy porters, recentBroadbay, soo, album and all kinds of Derin people that are doingreinterpretations. I don't think there's any particular wrong way to doit. It pends on your voice and how you perform and whatnot. So I do think thatthey'll kind of Stayn the test of time I mean we're still. You know rightbefore lockdown we were talking about. You know the the Ameldostan Gypsy transferring toBroadway from London and there's always talk of a revival of one of seven sontime show. So I thinkthat we're going to find new ways of doing them, like whenever the Swini Tadat Pag lopone and everyone playing the instruments of the Gen doy right comaround. I think we're going to we're going to find new ways of doing it andbecause the lyrics are so, you know such a Gut Punch and really are like. I said Ron oft and honest. Ithink that they will ultimately always survive. It'll just be a way of tryingto reinterpret and do it in a way that is going to appeal to contemporary audiences, but, like Isaid, I've been seeing so many interpretations of different songs andthat's another thing that another reason why I kind of wanted to do thisin the more strippd down kind of way,...

...because I think we've seen the the kind ofthing we're seeing now is. Are All these you know totallydifferent interpretations like in different Y Ow, musical styles andwhatnot. So I think that we've done a lot of that. So I'm I was looking moreto strip it down to its bare bones of you know the music and the lyrics. So Ido think that it'lit'll sick around I'll just be evolution. You know, in mymind, he's kind of a modern day shakespeare where the language you knowpeople say: Oh, my God, his lyrics are so much and as a performer we know Imean you've done into the woods. You had to memorize that that fast, youknow your fault and it's like, Oh, my God, there's so many words. Okay, butreally just like the language of Shakespeare, you know it's kind offlowery, but it has so much meaning and it's constantly, even in today's agebeing looked at again and reinterpreted, andit's funny that we're going to be celebrating the thirtieth anniversaryof assassins, which we know Steven Sonheim's, controversial peace andthey're getting together some of the original cask members and that show inparticular, I mean talking about an almost glorifying the assassinationattempts on our president, and then we come out of this administration and into a newadministration where we're talking about the rules of president and howpeople are reacting and how people are incited to do certain things it. Youknow it's all fresh again, and so, just like you said this musical hasrelevance not only Ese a music just beautiful,but it's like a definite comment as to what we're going through as a nation.Now you have performed jacket into the woods and we know all of our friendshave done into the woods a million times. We've done into the woods amillion times I mean we. We always have to go tee. A production like everymonth was like: Oh okay, we've sat through that show how many times we'velistened to the the recording, how many times but playing Jack. How did youmake the role your own, especially like...

I said when we've seen it presented somany times and we kind of know what audiences expect and what we evenexpect ourselves as an actor? How what's that creative process for youtaking on such a well known role, yeah, I think that it's just a matter of Imean as simple as it sounds it just coming from your perspective, I mean, like you know,coming especially you know. Jack isn't written, like obviously is like a queercharacter, but you know, coming from he feels kind of e seems kind of isolated.He seems kind of you know like he doesn't fit in, and I think that that'spart of it, but I think you can take like you- can take that from your life as a queer person and kind of use that,and also sometimes I think it's been done, not in a bad way. Just adifferent interpretation is that H, he's kind of like you know totally dumband the comedy comes from like how dumb he is, and I think that you can comefrom like a little bit of a place of like you know like Aat, that age Persa when you're youngeryou're, coming from a more naive place, because you haven't seen the world- andthat is you- know, part of the song of giants and the Ky him realizing. You know growing up, you know they sayit's. You know you know like allegory for for going through pubertyor whatnot, but I think that if you come from like a more just like wideeyed like naive to the world, but actually Jack is pretty smart and he'strying to forge away from himself. I think it creates kind of a differentversion of the character. I think a lot of times when I see it done it's likePeope, it's easy to go for the you know he's just like a total idiot and atotal like, like. Sometimes you know like a like a kind of like straight guy,bro kind of stupid. Yeah way of doing it- and I feel like if youcome from like a queer perspective of like kind of being on the outside andjust being totally new to a world that you know nothing about as opposed tostupid, it's more just like, like you just haven't, had the life experience,I think you can kind of make it your...

...own. I love that that perspective on it,because what I've always gotten from that character and I hate when into thewoods, is presented as so one dimensial. It's like. Let's play everything forthe laughs, you don't play everything for the last, because then you're goingto you're going to miss the meat of it. What I've always been drawn to thatcharacter is I'm a mama's boy and you know Jack is a mamas goint to what Ithink is he's motivated by so much love. His love for Milky White comes from avery sweet sincere place, and then he goes through all this process to helphis mom. You know with money and how to better their lives together and heloves his mom so much, and so when he loses her, I find that so devastatingand it's usually a point. That's just kind of brushed Oside, and so I seeeverything that he does comes from a place of love and I do respond to thatkind of queer sensibility that he comes fromwhere he is alone and he has an attachment to his mom and he likespretty things. That's exactly right, because it's likecoming from that place of love and kind of like that's where his like strugglecome from. He loves his MOM. He loves where he is. He loves me. Yo wainteverything kind of comes from that place and you wrigte that guy that kindof is like secondary. It's almost like he's so stupid that he stays here. Doesthis with that? The other thing, but it's like it, really comes from hisinternal struggle, comes from like want Tou Sav with this mom wunning nokiwhite. You know like not really understand it not have. You know, haveat experience the world in this way. So yeah, I totally agree and going back toyour point about assassins to which was. I totally agree with that as well,because I think a lot of these sontime songs and shows were written to convey a certain thing at the time,but like just like assassins like you were saying. That was a great point.It's like they take on they're, so well. Writtenin is like Shakespeare, and you want to see other people interpreting theseworks just like Shakespeare. It's they take on a totally new meaning for ourtime, with each different generation, so they're written for one thing andthey take on...

...a totally other thing and they' writtenaway that they're not dated they're, just very kind of like general. So Ithink that's another reason that was a really good point about he assassinsand how that's finning in with you know kind of our current political landscape. So it's soI think that's a great point. Another reason why they'll stick around andtrans. I want to talk about again your interpretations. You havehonored musicians like I mentioned, Linda Rodstatand Rogers on Hart, youpay a mach to them, but the music is still very much your own. I get yoursense coming out from it. What are the most impiportant factors?A singer must remember when honoring, a musician with a focus type shows we'veall sat through Camberes that have not been the best, so you coming from doing themsuccessfully. What do you think a singers really need to remember whenpresenting a one person Shom? Well, I think that you have to have kind of obviously like a through lineof what you're trying to get across. Is it that you want to show what a like,for example, the literons set show my go was to show what a wide breath of material and jenre she covered and allthe things she you know she did and why she kept striving to do differentthings. So in that show in particular, my goal was to always come out of from yourperspective, so don't try to ting it like Lenderon, sad, don't try to singit like whoever sing it like you bring you to it, bringnew arrangements. I think, when you're doing a solo show and you're trying to honor someone by just doing the songs, you know andnot trying to put your own spin on. It is the wrong thing to do so. For theLinderrons AV, for example, I wanted to create kind of cabaret, Broadway type,the fit my voice arrangements that were new arrangements, new tempos sing themin my style, but show the wide breath of you know what Linderon said had done.You know in terms of pop rock country,...

...traditional Mexican songs, just you know, Broadway, Gilbert andSullivan and and of taking all of those and coming out. From my perspective,how I sing how my musical director that I work with does arrangements but kindof giving a nod to them and showing the audience kind of what they're doingwith stories aloing the way betcoming in from your perspective, in Your Voice,I think, is the best way, because you see a lot of those shows where they'retrying to to kind of imitate exactly you know: Linderon, stador, Roges andHart. You know music from that era, and to me it's about. I want to show yousomething different in terms of these arrangements in the way I'm singingthem, but I want to also honor them, so I'm not taking them. You know in atotally crazy direction, but I just wanted to be different enough, sothis's my stamp, but gives a nod to the person and then shows kind of liketheir life and their work. So I think just coming from you and making itdifferent, like you're like you're, creating a brand new show of your ownmusic, what you would do with it, what you would do with he arangements andthen commenting on the artist. That's why? I love peoplelike Justin Vivian Bond. You know whenever theyre they're always doing you know like not tributes but like kind of likecovers of some of the songs that they love so much and it's in their way. I'mseeing Justin Vivian Bon through the unseeing, this person, Judy Collins,for example through the Lens of Justin Vivian, Bon, and I think that's whatcan make a really great kind of interesting moment. So, let's talk about so many peoplelike we mentioned it's kind of a stripdown version. It's you on a pianonot recorded in front of a live audience, which I love your albums.That are because it has this energy. We get to hear a little bit of your banterand it has a totally different energy. Was this totally terrifying becauseit's very naked in a certain way was...

...jus terrifying to record number one andnumber two two kind of release to the World Yeah little bit? Just becauseit's like because it's on time and you know the phrasing and the lyrics andeverything not that all composers in thers that aren't you don't want tohonor their work but with sonetime there's an extra level of anxiety toyou know honor the lyrics, because it's like poetry, it's like Shakespeare's,like our modern day, like you said, and so there's that there's that pressureof doing the of creating your own phrasing and doing the songs in yourway, honoring the lyrics getting his point across. You know there's alwayswith with with singers. It's always like you know. You want to prove likethat, you're, a good singer. How good you think, how hig you can sing andwhatnot, but with San Time I think it's like really about serving the songs andwhat he's trying to say it's a it's, a it's a story and an idea. So it was,you know pretty scary, just because it was just me and piano in the studio Iwas. I was in the recording studio and- and you know you want to make sure you'regetting every single, a and the right you're wanting to get the phrasingright so thet, so that the breath is in the right place, because you know hehas a very specific way of talking and laying out. You know what he wants tosay, so that was scary and then because it's so raw and vulnerable and becausewe're in a time of quarantine when we're not really seeing anybody and andI can't perform live, I can't do these songs in front of an audience. You knowit feels very like naked and vulnerable and like you're kind of putting outsomething like a naked picture of yourself, yeahvery much thro yeah, exactly with this with this music, so you know strippingsomething down, especially with a like. A composer Leris is like Suntime isalways scary and you feel, like you know, I'm a fraud OFM, a fake. You knowlike, like you know, whenever you put something out like this, just becauseit is someone that's so lod and this...

...year is his nineeth birthday. So we sawthe you know the the the tribute kind of show towards thebeginning of the the pandemic, and you know you jus want to honor. You knowhim and what he does, and you know you don't. You know how judgementaleverybody can be about his stuff. Oh yesdefinitely, scary, what's funny,because even he can be judgmenttal about his stuff as well. You know wejoke about needing attention and I'm right there with you and there's nothing, there's nothingbad with that, especially if you admit it, and especially if you are puttingout great content that people are responding to there's no there's no bad element to that and being aware. Buthow has covid played with that part of your psyche? We're not gettingattention from audiences in front of us how, as that made you kind of adjustyour thinking on performances, career and even your personal life yeah? It'sI mean it just like everybody else has been really really tough and it's sofunny that you say that about. Like you know, everybody wants attentionsepecally, if you're a performer you're putting something out it just is Hola. I love to just like,like brought the like kind of joke about it because, like we all loveattention and of course like I love, you know likes and attention andwhatnot and homing, but it's funny to me like that whenever you see on socialmedia like people that are like putting out things, but in this like Vou like humble way and to me it's like youall, dons inpon INSEE, a Tweso, it's like to me. It's like funny to havelike kind of like an Altra Ego. That's like totally like, like you know likelike hungry, for attention and like and and whatnot, it's like. I just thinkthat the like being funny about it, an being kind of like over the topwithbout, your O and is, can be really Funn, because I just get reallyexhausted by the people that are pretending that they don't wantattention, but they put an album out or they're in a show. It's like. So to me.It's like you know during the pandemic, its been really tough because you know I work in theater. As for youknow my job and also yeah. I'm a...

...performer recording artists, so there'sa lot of performing whether it's in front of you know producer clients andbeatings, whether it's in on a stage that you don't get that soit's like. I notice myself like towards the beginning of the pandemic, likekind of like going nuts on instagram or instagram stories. It's like it's likeyou need that connection, and it's not even so much about like all the timelike look at me. It just is like when you're a performer somebody, that's youknow, I'm also an only child. So it's like like me to I love Chbut, so it's like. So it'slike you know like that validation. It's like you know to be like for any performer.Anybody who who's doing anything creative. It's you know in this kind ofarena. It's so tough to just be locking your partment espcially in know. I livein New York City, so you know I live in a small apartment and you're you don'tsee anybody, it's just you know it does. reak havoc on your. You know. Part ofyour identity is your voice, your performance, how you are in front ofpeople and whatnot, if that's all stripped away, it does make you think,like you know who am I? What am I? What am I iaskin the people, because youknow I put a lot of stock on people being like he's. The singer he's theperformer. He does this and if you take all of that away, it's like you know itbrings up a lot of questions about who you are because you know you don't havethat and I think a lot of people are asking who they are and whatnot, butit's a different Leve H. I think, if you're, if your identity is tied tobeing you know a public person or a performer or a podcast or whatever itis, you know when that's taken away. Itdoes make you really question you know like if this was all taken away. Who AmI? What does it make me so it does. You know it has reakd Havick on the oldpsyche, let's say: Well, I totally agree with you not to be dramatic oranything I've taken. It's like not how many podcast episodes or how manyarticles I've written in my leaving...

...behind, but what legacy am I leavingbehind for for the people of around me? What real legacy in terms of compassionrelationships have I created and will will I leave behind rather than justfrom a professional point of view? Okay, I have to know what is your backstageritual before a performance? Do you go? Do you have like a certain steps thatyou have to do, or do you just kind of show up and enjoy it? What kind of backstage perform are you mim filled to the Brim with anxiety atall times, so I'm not the kind of performer that, like you know, I doshows with a lot of people like there's a show called love bites at Joe, thatwe do it joes pub at the public theater- and you know everybody you know like Jusen Binbian. Bon was actually in thatI think one year and Michael Musto nd people like that these grigorious typeyeah well, and what that and like you know, people are backstage like thisthat and the other like Chit chatting this. I am someone that needs to belike totally focused. I don't want to Chitchat with you. I want to kind of bein my own little area. I don't really like to eat anything before I performsome star and then and I like to have the snacks.Whatever I have. You know, I usually like just ecause useer backtateon, aaccess to a bar. If it's somewhere like that, so I always have a bottle ofmakers like a little bottoe of makers, and then that was like getting my Dacokpouring some of it out then putting some of the the makers mark in there Ialways have to. I always go on with like, like not always, but I like to goon with like a drink to just like losine up, because my anxiety is soaded ten and I'm like so focused on doing a good job and whatnot that it'slike. If I just let leave myself to my own druthers, it's like I'm toing, my headand what nat so it's like. I like to focus I like to have a little drink. Very you know stretchy and back stage,and and you know, then what I'm done I can likerelax watch everybody else's performances. I love to go out and youknow watch everybody else, but beforehand I like to like not talk toanybody really not eat. Much before I...

...perform have a drink focus on what I'mdoing trying to like. Think of the lyrics make sure I havethose in order and whatnot and just kind of pretend backsage. Then this,like free, loving person that, like ell, you know, is into tack and to everybodyand kind of like going my own little cornor have my drink and and get readyto go on stage Im. So with with you there. I don't like people coming up totalk to me. I you know, I'm glad friends are there, but I don't want thecoming backstage before the show and an hour before I have perfected it that I have it downto a science that it's two white wines before I hit the stage: U Kno less andno more because I relaxed, and then you know I can kind of my head voice, justkind of opens up but anymore, and then I'm flashing around in tat any lessthan it's just makes me anxious. Like yeah. That's that's the thing aboutlike being an anxious performor. Some people could just like love to justlike come in five minutes before go right on sage. For I'm not that person,I like not popl too much, I'm like starting honey at noon. Gettng ready Itactual cazy but likebut like, but,like you said it's like after after years and years berform you can perfecthow much alcohol and Wen to drink it, and that's very I'm usally, like onemakers and diet, a half an hour before I go on and then if the order getschanged, you're like you're, basically screwed, because they, your like, likeyetleeingthattandanother rule I have with myself, is before I used to try tolike have all the sheet music and all the lyrics typed up, so that I would.They would be like right, the tip of my Tomgue, but I found that it wouldactually psych me out, and my brain would would make me think that I havelost all the lyrics, because I was trying to focus a half hour before soan hour before. I don't even think about the music and that's helpedbecause I've hit the stage not remembering the first line, because Isyhed myself out you guys sound exactly...

...alike in terms of like performing,because it's like it's his love of anxiety, where I'm almost doing likemagical thinking of like I have to do. This I have to do this at this time and it's like an and it does get inyour head, and then you like, like to your point, you're like over, preparedto the point where you're like syking yourself out that's kindof times I retLait. I thought it was that and then you're finding things that you didn'teven think about before and they got o like all in your headit yeah, it's Crezyeah, but we know once you hit the stage, the magic happens. Okay, we'regoing to play a little rapid fire. Are you ready? Yes, if you had to performone song for Steven Sonheim in his living room, what song would it be? Probably what can you lose because I think thatis one of his most underrated songs. I you know it's not recorded a lot solo.It's! I just think that that's one of his best songs, it's simple, you knowlike a man or a woman, consingint Tivea shing by souing lie both the man and awoman in the movie. I just think it's. It's such a great song and Tho on than YoCoty is sick up in auditions yeah a y. What songhim character would you loveto see a spinoff musical for? Oh, my God, that's us a grood question. I think maybe Carlada from Follis,because I'm so here is one of my favorite songs of all time and I'd loveto see her trajector what she does because she's one of those survivorperformers like you know they, don't we don't have them so much anymore. It'slike even though not the biggest fand of e, like re, Osmond or examples oeother survivors, she's done a variety show she's on Broadway like thesepeople. That just like constantly do the next thing, and so to me carlotherwould be you know like. What's her next act, Yeu'd be on TVZ, probably ATHAT'sfunny. What is Ha guilty pleasure song on your playlist doesn't have to bemusical theater, but a song that you're so embarrassed by. But you love. Let methink about that. One sees for me, I'm not one that subscribes too much toguilty pleasures. I think that like if...

...something like Frien Leewood said thisrecently in pretended o the city on Netplix, but it's like yeah. Ifsomething gives you pleasure, there's so much harsh reality in the worldtheres. Something is your pleasure. It's not guilty. It just is simplypleasure. I mean I'm trying to think like what is it soenomes? I think I'dbe embarrassed. You know my spotify year, endlist or whatever with like,with, like you know like some days I'll get in a rabbit hold of listening tolike bad musicals like Jacoan, Hyde or something, and I listen to O, like onesong from every cast album like in a row, and it makes me look, I anabsolute psychopath, but I might listen to like ie talk, someand like you whento enter someone like like I'm going down. Tho Listens if you W. I do thattoo yeah, and it's like you, because I want to hear the differences I wouldnow, my God try to I'm exactly and if there's a remix of it, I'm sold like Iloan every single remix as o Gn Apple Music thing in they'll, see like justcrs. You know, like the ones that are considered quote unquote guiltyCeasurei Jack on hies, the Firson th came to mind, but like and youill seelike every version, that's everyone recorded in a row and it looks likeI've been sitting in my room like in a corner like in fatal traction duringthe lihtas rocking at's Terevsonsoh. I love it and what wousd the name of themusical based on your life, be. Let's call it I'm still here, God itgot it. I love it all. Right, Travis tell everybody where you want them tofind you and follow you. You can find me on Instagram at Trab, JamesInstagram. You can find on my official website. Travis Measurecom, you cansearch for me. My album singles whatnot are available on apple music, spotify,itunes, anywhere you listen to music or purchase music, Amazon and twitter atTJ Moser. I love it so much and if I was going towhat's the first track that somebody that might not be familiar withsometime, what's the first track on so...

...is track on so many people, your latest,album that they should listen to first. I think that the first line, Broadwaybaby, is a great intro into Steven Santin, because it's one of his mostaccessible songs. I think one of the most like typical Broadway songs, butit has that, but it has that slight suntime hard edge of somebody reallypounding the pavement and it kind of not happening for them and during thiskind of of covid. I think we can all relate to really try to make somethinghappen and hoping and looking towards the future and just having that hopeand faith is going to happen before it's even happened, whether it'sgetting out of the pandemic, whether it's getting a job. So I think thatBroadway baby, if you listen to that the first song on the on the EP- that'sthat'll, give you a great Insuran Asign Time Travis. It has been a delight tochat with you. It's delight to listen to your music and I cannot wait to seewhat the future has. Thank you so much for having me. I love all of your shows,and I love meeting notheronly child yeah we to talk about what's Coven isover. We have a lot we're going to get together. We're going to be the ladieswho lunch and Weres Gin dish. I wontit thank you Travis! So much thank you. That has been my chat with Traficmosure. You can read my indepth interview with him at Metrosourcom, andthat is your episode. I'm your host Alexander Radriguez, you can find me onInstagram at Alexander, is on air until Nex time stay Trul, and do you boo that has been another metro sorse. Manylike share subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latestissue of Metrocorse magazine on New Stans or online at nettascortzcom.Follow us on Facefoom, Instagramat NATOSORT and on clanere TAT es course:Mat until next time, ta a.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (42)