Michael Cimino from Love, Victor

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of Metrosource Minis, we chat with Las Vegas born Michael Cimino, who started acting at the age of 8, moved to LA, got cast in Annabelle Comes Home and of course, Hulu’s Love, Victor…we are proud to feature him in our Pride issue on
newsstands across the nation.

We chat with Michael about his own experience with bullying, his love of acting, his role as an ally, Season 2 of Love, Victor, and the future of diversity and representation in casting Hollywood.

with host Alexander Rodriguez

This is metro source minis, theofficial podcast to Metro source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favoritepersonalities from the lgbtq world and beyond. Quick, Fun and informative. It'snatural source on the go, out in proud since one thousand nine hundred andninety. Hello, hello, this is metro source minis. I'm your host, Alexander Rodriguez, lead rider for Metro source and avid podcaster. We loveour allies and entertainment, especially when they are part of telling our LGBTQ stories. Today I chat with Las Vegas born Michael Samino, who started acting atthe age of Eight, move to La gets cast in at about comes homeand, of course, gets cast and Hulu's Love Victor. We are proudto feature him in our pride issue on new stands across the nation. Pleasewelcome Michael Samino. Hi, wow, that was really that wasn't really goodintro. Too much coffee. So, Michael, you come from a verycolorful background. You are Italian, German and Perto Rican descent. That musthave been some lively childhood, to say the least. What was culture likein your house? Well, it was interesting, you know, because mydad is obviously like white, you know, so it like it's a little bitdifferent, but my mom is Super Latina. Like my whole family fromNew York moved to day is basically we and so growing up it felt waymore like a Latino household and like Italian household, because my whole Italian sideof the family was like in Florida. So growing up in Vegas was likeit was cool because, like my home was like my safe haven, youknow, like it was my place to come home and be me and eatfood that felt like it was I was supposed to eat, the exact sense, like food I ate with my family. That felt special and, you know, place to just like come home to and be with people that arelike me. I love it. Well, hello, I'm Latina as well.Now, what are the favorite parts...

...of your heritage? Honestly, likeI think that I love like the cooking aspect of like, especially my family. Like cooking is such a big part of our, you know, ourculture and like especially my like family dynamic. You know, like Thanksgiving is likeone of my favorite holidays, just because we would always sit there andcook for four days before we did anything, and it's always been like a wayto kind of like bond the family because, you know, I thinkyou know this, Latinos are very dramatic and there's always some sort of dramain the family. And when there is, you know, there's always a goodmeal and then everyone comes together and eats and then, you know,we move on. But you know that is so true. We eat whenwe want to celebrate, we eat when we're angry, we eat when we'redepressed, we eat after a funeral, after a baptism, after a wedding, just always eating exactly exactly, like you know, it's just something it'slike always bonding my family. My Grandmother's passed away now for like six years, but like we still use her recipes and like every Thanksgiving we think abouther and we cook with all her recipes and stuff, and that makes uslike feel connected to her, you know they it's something it's like is alwaysreally kind of bonded me. My family like to like the FM degree.Well, it's really a family history that's carried down through recipes. I meanyou can literally see the growth generation after generation and you just, like yousaid, when you eat something, it inspires all of the senses and reallytakes you back to generations before you, I like literally, and now vegansit's a little bit more difficult because, like we used to make this.My favorite thing was Gonneghi, shallow. My Aunt dtvl we used to makeit and show God that was so good. She makes like you's to make apot that was like like so big, like bigger than my life, likea huge, huge pot, and she's like, I made this forfifteen and we'd all come on every Sunday and eat Gannigi shadow and I eatit throughout the week. I take it to school, like that was myfavorite. I can't eat that now because I'm Vegan, but I'm definitely likeeventually going to try to figure out a...

...way to make it like a Veganlike beast to you know. Okay, so I was gonna I was gonnatime it to see how long it took before you told us you were Vegan. I knew you were a Vegan. So I'm teasing. But what sparkedthat kind of Tristan in going to the Vegan lifestyle? Well, so,to be honest, like when I was younger, I was having like alot of health issues and like I was having like a lot of really,really, really bad stomach issues and stuff, and I was like, you knowwhat, like I'm going to switch my diet up and I'm just gonnatry this out, and helped me a lot and ever since that I'd neverturned back. Like I'm sure I can eat meat now and I'd probably befine. But like at this point it's like so good for the environment,it's so good for your health. Like I feel great, you know,and I think that's the most important thing. When anything you know well in createscomes sont of like you know, your body is regular. If you'refilming a whole day, you don't, you do not want to have stomachis. Yeah, exactly, exactly, like you know, I don't know, like these are long film days. Fourteen hour days are long, youknow, and like when you when if you feel like crap, like evenworse. Yeah, you're like, I'll be at my trailer for an hour. Yeah, exactly. Now you started acting at the age of Eight.What what did you learn in those early years as a kid acting, aboutacting and the Biz that you still subscribe to today? I think I justlearned how special this art form is, you know, like it's something thatis so it's something that we all kind of do, even as children,you know, like we all play pretend, we all since we're little, youknow, and it's in, it's it. What really boils down tois just like your imagination and care, I like creating or connecting to yourcreativity, and that's, I think, the think, something that like isreally stuck with me and that like I continue, like if I ever feel, you know, like overwhelmed their stressed about like what I'm doing, orwere like you know, because I mean there was times where, like,especially when I was like eighteen, I...

...was I was really down and out. I was I was pretty poor and, you know, I was like,you know what, maybe I should just give this up. This isbefore I struck any success and I was like maybe I should just give thisup. I haven't booked a job in two years and I've been in Lafor six months. I having any luck, and my friends like having me downand talk to me, and it just reminded me that, like,Oh crap, like this is something that is so, so sacred and it'ssomething that has the ability to change people's lives and change my life as well, you know, like I've grown so much to the characters that I've playedand like I just I honestly that that's kind of what, like, isjust so amazing to me about this art form and what I subscribe to youon the day today well. And also you're able to inspire. You don'tknow who's going to see something that you do in some random town somewhere that'sgoing to be inspired to be an actor, inspired to tell their story as well. Exactly what I think. It's not even necessarily about being an actor. Like I think my biggest thing is that, just like I think anybody, everybody in the world, she just do what they're passionate about. Likedoesn't matter what you're passionate about. If you're passionate about selling flowers, soflowers, like it's that simple. If that's really what brings you joy,just do it, like it's I think, you know, when we always area society kind of put like a monetary value and like what we do, you know, it's like, Oh, well, I'm a doctor. It'slike, Oh wow, he has a lot of money, and it'slike well, yeah, important, and I think that's as part of myfriends, but I think it's bullshit, like yeah, I think that we'rekind of in like a place in time where you can make a bunch ofmoney doing anything you want to do. Just be the best at what youlove to do and then you will make money. If you're a garbage man, if and if you that's what you really love to do, you can. You could move up in the ranks and become like the head of sanitation, you know what I mean. Like I think that, like, realistically, what people do. Side of what society kind of like forces these kidsinto thinking is that, like you need...

...to have a good paying job andbought about about, like that's not what life is about. Like if,realistically, if making money is what makes you happy, go go ahead anddo that. Like you can do you do real estate, you could dowhatever. But, like, if you are a doctor and you don't enjoywhat you're doing, if you don't enjoy saving lives, what are you doing? Why are you being a doctor if you're not an attorney and you don'tlike enjoy, you know, fighting for people's rights, and what are youdoing exactly? And you know, doesn't matter how much money you have.If you're not happy, you're not happy, and that's just there is to it. Money can't solve that. You know, Michael, not to bringthings down, but you did. You dealt with racism in elementary school andwe're actually bullied. Can you tell me a little bit about that experience?Yeah, I mean, like growing up, I grew up in the kind oflike an all white area. Vegas is is a pretty white town forthe most very white, you know, like it's a very transient city andyou know a lot of people from all over the place come and there's butespecially the quay went she was basically an all white school. I don't thinkthere was any other Latino kids in my class, if I can remember correctly, maybe one other kid and there was a few. There's a few.There's two black kids, one Asian person and then I think it was yeah, and then just me. Literally. I think it is like for peopleof color like class and it was the rest of us, like the restof the kids in the class for white. So like it was definitely kind ofweird growing up like in a place where there's there's no like set culture. I feel like in Los Angeles, in York and places like that,they have like a culture. Vegas is a very transient city and it hasnot necessarily like a set culture. We don't have any sport. Well,now they have sport teams, but when I was growing up, there's nosports teams, there was no you know, there's no sense of like city pride, if that makes any sense. Where it's like New York, it'slike, Oh yeah, I'm in New...

York's I oh, holy crap,you know, but it's not. It's not like that. And basically becauseof that, there's a lot of kids that were from all over the place. Who knows where their parents were from, from the middlewest maybe or something,and they were they were kind of racist. Like there was, youknow, times where I would get like bullied and beaten up and, youknow, there would be racial slurs thrown at me. Even into like mylater years and like Middle School, like I was still getting racial slurs thrownaround at me and like I feel like it was something where it was likeso weird that, because he was like almost normalized, that I didn't necessarilyunderstand that it was racist, if that makes any sense. I'd understand itwas racist until probably like like seventeen years old and I was like Whoa,wait a minute, that's racist as hell because, like I feel like whenyou're growing up in that kind of environment, you don't necessarily understand the scope oflike what's being said. I totally agree with you. I went toI went to school in South Southern California and you would think, Oh,you know, it's pretty affluent and mix, but I was one of the onlyLatin kids and being made fun of for being Latin and, you know, having us a single parent, it was just normal for me. So, just like you said, I didn't realize how awful it was. Itwas just like, Oh, well, this is just this is part ofwhat being Latino is or, you know, being part of a lower income family. Is You just connected it? Almost? Yeah, yeah, exactly. And like another thing is, you know, I was of you know, growing up in a place like this. It was a very toxic masculinity,like very toxic masculinity base place. You know, like growing up,I was definitely more of like a feminine like Kid, I guess you couldsay, at least to the other kids, you know, because it's like Iwas into the arts and like I wanted to sing and do that sortof stuff, and that was considered feminine to them, and so they wouldalways like saying like slurs about you know, just just like the normal hateful stuffthat is said. But like it...

...elementary school and it was horrible,but like I just thought it was like normal, which is horrible as helllike that. That's that should not be normal for anybody, you know.Yeah, exactly. I think we're bringing more awareness and you know, showslike love Victor definitely on a mainstream platform or definitely bringing awareness and we're havingthese conversations now in households because we have to because, you know, youyou can't ignore the effects on bullying on any minority group at all. Yeah, I want to talk about you know, your generation comes from a very differentview of sexuality and labels. Yeah, when I grew up, we justhad Adam and Eve, gay and straight and like that was it.And now we have we have different letters and now we have different ideas ofgender fluidity. What was your own personal not from your peers, but whatwas your own view about sexuality and kind of gender roles from your younger generationperspective of well, so that's an interesting question because I feel like like Ifeel like that's something that like we all still are kind of figuring out youknow, like I think. I think sexuality is like always like an everchanging and like evolving thing, and I think that like for me personally growingup, I you know, growing up in like a very much easomer homeand then going to a school where it was like very much like you needto be masculine, are you going to be bullied? Right. So thatwas very much like I was super scared of just being true to myself andlike who I am now, right. And but now I'm very expressive aboutlike who I am and what I do. I dress however I want and likeI do whatever I want to do. I'd paint my nails, I don'tI don't care, you know. And that that side note. Thereis this thing that like I saw on the other day on Instagram, andI understand agree. Like that doesn't mean like Oh, like, like Idon't think that should be something that like is like looked up upon. There'slike Oh my God, like he's just dressing, he's dressing so feminine.Like shout out to you for like breaking general worms, because the the lgbtcommunity has been doing that for forever.

I'm trying not to curse. I'mlike, so I try not to carr out. You could do whatever youwant. You're Michael Stamino. Like the LGBT community has been doing that forfucking ever, you know what I mean? Like, just because I dress howI want to doesn't mean I'm special or I'm I'm changing the norms,when realistically, it's just an adaptation of what the lgbt community has been doingfor such a long time, and it's just like trendy now and it's justlike, I feel like it helps me express who I am, and Ithink that that's a big thing, you know. But with that, Ithink that we're kind of in a place in time where it's more accepted tojust be true to who you are. Living your truth is basically, youknow, the only mantra and anybody should have. Okay, so let's talkabout love, Victor, did you have a talk with your agent or managerbefore auditioning? You know, a nervous about, you know, playing alead in a quote unquote gay show, afraid of being pigeonholed in the industry? Did you have that conversation? So, a few years prior, I wastold that, like, you can't take a gay role for your firstbig role because you're only getting cast and gay roles. You know the everyone'sget to your game and that's not like but like when I first audition forlike the first time, I found out about love victory, was called lefttime in the series. I watch movie and I love the movie. Iwas like I want to be part of that, and I'm sure you've heardof that story. But yes, basically I went in for a different audition. I saw that they were casting that in the same office. It's like, Oh, interesting. Next day I got an audition for that. Iwas like, okay, cool, and right this the red side. Iwent in, I did my audition and stuff and I felt like really connectedto me. I just felt like something like this is this is something thatcould really make a difference, you know. And then I got a call backand we kept going and going and going, and I really worked reallyhard to like make sure that I like that I could represent the community accuratelyin this, you know what I mean. Like it was something where I hadto fight for it. We there's a one point in time where theyrerelease a role when I was testing and...

I was like I was doing alike a little short or a little indie film somewhere else and I was likethis is this is not the end for me, for this. I waslike I'm not giving up on this, and I called my agents and likeplease call casting. Let them send me and let them let me send inanother tape, like let me, let me just try again, like letme try, and he let me send in a tape and then went inagain and again and then then here we are, you know. But like, I definitely like this whole experience was like so amazing and it's I honestlydon't really like I do care about like like my job and stuff, butI don't really care how like if, like the industry tries to pigeon holeme as a quote unquote gay character, because I feel like that's such anold stereotype. That is'sues. It's just like people trying to be like don'tplay gay roles, you know what I mean, where it's like it's justpeople that have like their own prejudice towards that. If that, you know, if it is changing, but I do still think it's always in theback of our mind, such as you know, you get the part.All the headlines are very exciting. Our community is waiting with bated breath forthe TV series based on a movie that we love, and of course,the first question that people on every side go to is is he or isn'the? Was it weird to have such a focus on your sexuality when it'slike, Hey, I got this part in a great series. Let's talkabout my acting, let's talk about the storyline, but a big question wasis he gay? Is He not gay? Is that weird to have that kindof focus on that part of your life? I mean, yes andno, like I've kind of like expected that, you know, like Iwas kind of like mentally prepared for that question to be asked and like forpeople to who really care about it. I just don't think that I expectedpeople to care as much as they did, if that makes any sense. where, you know, I was, I was getting death threats stuff forlike and like that's crazy to think about, you know, like I didn't knowthat it was going to be to...

...that degree, you know, butI regardless. was like I was getting death threats from both sides, youknow, like there was very angry people that are part of the lgbt communityand then there's very angry like conservatives and you know, like it was likea weird, weird thing and but you know what, like I'm so gladthat I that I did it, because the amount of love that I've receivedand like the amount of like change at this show has had on other people'slives is is like insurmountable to like the what has happened like in the pass, if that makes any sense. Yeah, totally. And you know, gayplaying gay, straight playing gay's such a hot topic in Hollywood. I'vealways come from a place that, yes, I would love to see more Lgbtqcommunity with representation, and that is happening. We are getting that,but I also want to see the best actor in a role. I meanthat's where I'm coming from. Now. has this kind of discussion affected yourexperience with the show, because you are, you know, identify a straight playinga gay character, so a lot of this discussion is exactly what you'redoing right now. I think. I think the thing is is that,like if it actors taking a gay role and and really is trying to honorthe people that go through this struggle on a daytoday basis and live in thatstruggle. That is different than an actor that is taking that job to geta paycheck. You know what I mean? Because realistically, like I think youknow, like's there's a we need to just continuously tell these stories andsometimes, like sometimes, it just sometimes it's just about the best actor.And I'm not saying that I was the best accu by any means, butI think, like, I think, that it just is one of thosethings that you have to continuously go and do and, like we eventually wewill find the correct answer. But I...

...think right now it's just a aninteresting landscape to be in that, like we don't really know what's next asfar as like that whole world, but I do think, as you're rightnow, that I think that it is it is important as long as thethe actor really cares about the community and like really wants to represent them inan accurate way. I think that that's okay. I think that's the bestanswer to that question that I've heard. And you know, you obviously havefirsthand experience. Now you've embraced our community with open arms, even a rolemodel. You've been a spokesperson for a number of lgbtq youth you volunteered,gotten involved in in our organizations. Most actors get to do their part.They do press and then you know and then that's it. This has beena big commitment on your part personally to get involved further. Yes, doyou ever feel sometimes it's like well, can I just can I just actand do the part? And you know, there's a lot of pressure being aspokesperson and it is a commitment personally. What made you go and take astep further? Well, I mean, I think it's like I don't like, as much as I love the show and like as much as Ido, what I do for the show. It's not even necessarily for the show. I do it because it's like I care about the LGBT community.My cousin's gay, like my friends are gay. I you know what Imean, like I can't, I can't not be there for them and Ihope that, like, if they was a situation where, like, youknow, Latinos were like, what's going on at the border, whatever else, like, I would hope that they would be there writing for me too. You know what I mean. We're we are all human beings, especiallyif we're in a minority. We need to be there for each other.Like it's the same thing that happened with like all the protests are happening inLa like I had to be there. You know, that's just not thetype of person I am and it's obviously the show is like provide me agreat platform to talk more about lgbt rights.

But regardless, I will continue totalk about agbt rights because that's that's just there are the right thing todo. Well, I thank you and you know, if we all succeed, we all succeed, you know, and that's only by supporting everybody.Exam okay, season two is coming out on Hulu Juna eleven. This season. Victors out, he's out of the closet, there's family drama. Withoutany spoilers, what are some of the changes we're going to see happen thisseason? I think you we explore more of the dynamic of Victor and Benji, you know, like it's definitely we explore more the dynamic of Victor goingfrom, you know, like being with somebody that wasn't necessarily like, youknow, somebody that he was necessarily attracted to the to the new dynamic ofhim in this new relationship and like him trying to figure out where he liesin this in in the world as the gay man. You know, Ithink that, like because I feel like a lot of gay men are kindof confused about where they lie in the world, you know, and Ithink that this is just like such a good way to kind of tell thatstory. Well, I think we're going to get a glimpse of also thefamily drama that's happening as a family beyond his coming out. You know,we get to see that a gay story is part of the family dynamic.But there's a lot going on with family dynamics, you know, and whatI love about the show is that it focuses on many different aspects of victor'sstory. It's not just gay, Gay, Gay, Gay, sexual, sexual, sexual, you know, it's about how we live life growing up, no matter who you are. Yeah, I'm and that's what I really loveabout the show. Yeah, I think the overarching theme of the showis just to be true to who you are as a person. Yeah,like that's definitely like it's just like victor kind of navigating this lay, thisnew landscape that like it just so happens to be that like it's part ofhim navigating who he is, is discovering his sexuality, you know, andI think that that's so beautiful because it's so easy to digest and for peopleto watch and be like, Oh,...

I understand this, and I thinkthat's been the best thing. To receive like text and stuff from my familythat wasn't necessarily the most accepting of the ogbt community and they're like, youknow, I didn't really support this and I watched the show and it changedmy completely change my view on it, and that's like a crazy thing.That's huge. They people really like literally like Juxtapost to you, like likeor in arms reach, like changing their perspective on things through your art.Like one of my friends watch the show with her mom and then came outto her mom after the show. You know, that's a that's a that'sa big thing. It opens up conversations and it makes it easier to havethese kind of conversations. We didn't have shows like this when I was growingup and so I didn't have the conversation till I was older, and Ithink this is inspiring youth to be true to themselves early on. You know, youth is dealing with puberty, youth is dealing with weird growth spurts,youth is dealing with so many things. So the easier that we can makethis this kind of process, the better. Now, what do you want tosay to the straight community as our ally regarding the Lgbtq community, Ithink that we just need to do better. I think that, like you know, I think that a lot of people are like, well, it'snot my problem, so it's like who cares? It's like, oh well, like, like I don't care, I have a gay friend. It'slike, well, what are you doing to like help them? Like,you know, we as people need to use our privilege to help others getto the places that they need to be. You know, like we need tocontinue this fighting equality way beyond just being like well, I have agay friend, like that's death. That's not that's not helping our fight ine quality. Go to pride, don't e money, good, attend meetings, don't your time, like if you don't have money going, don't ityour time, or you know what I mean. Like it just we coulddo more. We can do more. Aren't and I think that, likewe are definitely taking strides to do so. I think people are becoming like,Oh shit, yeah, I can't do more, but it just takestime. You know, I love that answer. What does pride mean toyou? Not Necessarily for the Lgbtq community,...

...but what does pride mean to youpersonally? I feel like pride is just again, just being about beingauthentically who you are in every way, shape and form. Like there's people, if you go to pride, there is, you know, there isdrag Queens, just more FEM gay presenting men. There's there's gay men thatthere that are drive Harley's or right Harley's, like it doesn't matter. I thinkthat's an amazing thing about, you know, the the landscape that werein right now is that it's showing that we there's no right or wrong wayto be gay. It's just just be true who you are, and Ithink that pride is just that. It's a big be prue who you are, but also be proud of like your sexuality, and be proud of whoyou are, and you could wear that your heart and your sleep. BeBe happy to love who you love and be Pridel for loving the people thatyou love. Exactly. Okay, you said in one of your interviews that, if season two is a thing, you weren't going to buy a specificcar. It had a bunch of letters and numbers and it as that I'mSuper Gay. So I have no idea what car you were talking about.I Ober everywhere. What was the car and are you going to get it? So it's called the dads into Z and I actually already bought it.Ah, congratulations, season two gift A. Right. Yeah, I bought itand it's literally sitting in my mom's garage. It's like I bought likethis a shell and I'm going to build it. I just haven't started doingit yet, but I'm really soaked about like starting that process. It's justI wanted to do it right and I want to take my time with it, so I haven't started doing it yet. Awesome. Did you work at SaddleRanch, by the way? Huh Yeah. Do you have any funnystories from working and supple right? I have the craziest stories. We're gonnahave to hear it, okay. Like one time there was this this ladywas on a I think on a Monday night. is on a Monday night. It was late. We're about to...

...close up in this lady's like Hey, I want to ride the Mechanical Bull, and my boss, like I wasa mechanical bull operator. All right, we're closing up. We're closing up, and he's like and this guy gives slips some some money. He'slike, let her ride the bull. Is that all right? Cool,cool, he starts. She starts writing the bull. This lady takes hertop off on the bowl and this if this is a family restaurant, topoff on the bowl. Everyone's screaming, it's every look, crowds going crazy, like it was insane, like, and I have so many I workedthere for like a month and a half, two months, and it was literallyinsane. Oh my God. Well, that's I mean that's a whole TVshow on its own. I've been kicked I've been kicked out of Sunderranch many times, so that's why I had to ask the question about it. Oh Man, yeah, it was. It was an interesting place to work, to say Belle's okay. And finally, what is your message toyour Lgbtq fans this prime season? Just be authentically who you are, nomatter what that is. It's that simple, I think. I think that's reallythe only message I can't give, to be honest. Oh, Icould literally talk to you forever, because I know we're supposed to focus onthe victor, but I'm a huge horror film Fan. So Annabelle comes home. Was that fun filming? Oh my gosh, it was so much fun. Like I had such a good time. Gary Doberman is like so freaking incredible. He's just like the sweetest guy ever and really just he was justgreat. And then Madison and Katie and in McKenna, they they were allso kind to me and like even even Vera in Patrick, like they werealso nice to me. That was like my first like project. It waslike actually like a real deal thing. Yeah, and I just felt socomfortable there, even though I was obviously like nervous as hell. Like theymade me all feel so welcomed and comfortable and I just I'm so grateful toall of them to like to have Annabelle be like something. That was likemy first thing, you know. Yeah, I mean that's that's so Hollywood horrorfilm. I mean that's that's the whole different genre and I love it. Michael, tell everybody where you want...

...them to find you and follow you. Okay, yeah, so my instagram is at it's Michael Samino. MyTick Tock is the same thing and I have some music coming out soon,so get ready for that. What kind of music? It's kind of likelike pop RMB, like pop alternative rb. I don't know, we're still kindof figuring out the genre, but it's really it's like really chill musicand I'm really excited for it. We it should be coming up pretty soonhere. I don't want to say too much, but yeah, yeah,soon for sure. Well, we will definitely look forward to that. Weare definitely going to look forward to season two of Love Victron Hulu June eleven. In the meantime, everybody can binge watch season one over and over.This has been my interview with Michael Somino. You can read my indepth interview withhim on Metro Source Pride issue on news stands across the nation, orread it on Metro sourcecom. Michael, thank you so much. Thank youso much for having me. I really appreciate it. You are my favorite. Thank you. You're great. All right, that is our episode.I'm your host and lead writer from Metro source, Alexander Rodriguez. You canfollow me on Instagram at Alexander is on air. Until next time, staytrue and do you boo. That has been another metro source mini like,share, subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latest issue ofMetro Sports magazine on newstands or online at Metro sourcecom. Follow us on FacebookInstagram at metal source and on twitter at Metro course man. Until next time, thank fast.

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