Jeremy Blacklow - Director of Entertainment Media for GLAAD

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jeremy Blacklow joined GLAAD in 2017 as Director of Entertainment Media, where he serves as a liaison between GLAAD and the film, television, music, and gaming sectors, working to ensure that the industry is equipped to leverage GLAAD’s research and resources to bring about fair, inclusive, accurate, and diverse representations of LGBTQ people and issues. 

Prior to joining GLAAD, Jeremy worked for 17 years as a journalist, with a focus in entertainment news. He began his career in New York City at NBC’s Weekend Today show, and has worked for CNN, Telepictures, and NBC Universal. He helped launch the TMZ brand and the CAA-created digital agency WhoSay in. Jeremy spent five years as Managing Editor of AccessHollywood.com and later spearheaded the editorial relationship between Yahoo! and CBS’s The Insider, appearing frequently on-air as a contributor.

In recent years, Jeremy has worked as a digital marketing consultant, while also freelance writing for publications including Variety, TheWrap, and ETOnline. He’s a proud 10-time AIDS/LifeCycle participant, an electronic music producer and a DJ.  

We chatted with Jeremy about it ALL: the future of LGBTQ representation in the media, double standards with gay casting, activism fatigue, the AIDS Lifecycle, being PC, and even being single. Tune in!  

This is metro source. Minis the official podcast to Metro source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favorite personalities from the lgbtq world and beyond. Quick, Fun and informative. It's metro source on the go, out in proud since one thousand nine hundred and ninety. Well, hello, hello, hello. This is Alexander Rodriguez, lead writer for Metro Source Magazine and Avid podcaster during covid there has been one industry that has been getting us through this. I'm not talking about postmates, but thank you, postmates. are talking about entertainment. New York Post Up, New York Post reported that the average American is watching eight hours a day of content, and we know that we've experienced a boom in lgbtq representation and also a boom in lgbtq entertainment. People coming out of the closet of all of this entery go on. And today our guest is director of entertainment media for glad, Jeremy Blacklow. He joined glad in two thousand and seventeen as director of entertainment media, where he serves as laison between glad and the film, television, music and even gaming sectors. He works to ensure that the industry is equipped to leverage glads, research and resources to bring about fair, inclusive, accurate and diverse representation of lgbtq people and issues. Prior to glad, he worked as a journalist with a focus entertainment news. He began his career in New York City at NBC's weekend today show and has worked for CNN tele pictures in NBC universal. He helped launch the tmz brand and also the CEAA create a digital agency. Who say? He spent five years as managing editor of excess hollywoodcom and later spearheaded the editorial relationship between Yahoo and CBS. Is the insider appeared frequently on air as a contributor. In recent years he has worked as a digital marketing and consultant, whilso freelance writing for publications including variety, the rap and et online. He's a proud ten time aids life cycle participant and electronic music producer and a DJ. Hey, Mr Dj, put a record on. We can have Jeremy Black laud here. Hey, hello, thank you for laving me today, of course. So I want to know what it's like to sit back and listen to your resume kind of recited to you. Not so much in your career like who this guy on and you know you, it's you, but so many aspects of entertainment, from, you know, fun celebrity gossip, but you know, to presidential elections, the Iraq war. What was that turning point in your career where it kind of clicked for you and you're like, okay, my path is clear, I'm here to make a name for myself. What was that turning point for you? That's a great question. I mean, you know, I really come from the scene background that you come from, Alexander. I was a journalist, you know, and and my whole dream, my whole life was just to get into journalism and to do meaningful work. And and then very early on I found myself gravitating...

...towards entertainment because, like you, I love entertainment, I love Hollywood, I love storytelling and and really that's you know, whether you're a hard news journalist or you're in the middle of Hollywood, like like my careers, gone direction of being, you know, at the end of the day, at storytelling. Right at the end of the day. The thing at all, how has in common is the humanity and and being really committed to that art of storytelling, whether the you're the one telling the story or helping someone tell the story or working, you know, in this weird ecosphere that we call the entertainment industry. And so, you know, for me, I really just, you know, did the journalism thing for a long time and then I hit that point in my s where I needed something different and when the opportunity to go work for glad full time came along, it all clicked and I was like, Oh, this is what I want to be doing with my life right now, and I haven't really looked back since now. What was it about journalism like when you were a kid? was there like a new segment you saw, or was it, you know, like entertainment tonight as a kid? What was it about journalism that really kind of sparked your entrance in that? That's a really good question actually, and we didn't really get into this in the amazing profile that I'm so grateful that you wrote. You wrote for me and Metrosaurus, which my family and friends are so proud of. It was so fun to write. It was I was very honored. Thank you. My mom was a journalist actually reading. Wow. My mom was an on air anchor and reporter at the NBC affiliate and Seattle Washington, and she was one of the first journalists ever to appear on air pregnant in the mid s with me, and I sort of grew up in a news room, like I literally would go after school some days. You know, my parents were divorced. My you know, a lot of the time I was with my mom and I basically grew up in the king five news room in Seattle Washington and was surrounded by television journalism my whole life and, you know, in a Pre Internet era, I would watch the today show all the time and like sort of fell in love with watching like Jane Paully and Brian Dumble and then can myult hour on the today show. And like my whole life I was like I'm going to work with the today show one day, and sure enough, I did. I intern for them when I was in college living in New York City, and then, you know, went and got my first job out of school working for the today show. So that that you know, sort of watching it and being around it and being around journalists all the time. I always sort of thought all my mom's co workers were so cool. They swore all the time and they in like like. I was like, yeah, this is a career path for me, and that's kind of how I fell in love with it. So,...

Jeremy, I'm an attention who, but I'm also a mama's boy. What was it like having a mom? I'm sure she was so busy. If she wasn't on camera doing she was doing her research. You know, she was probably always always working, and did you feel like you had to share her attention with the world, or was it just kind of exciting because I would have been like hello, I'm over here. Yeah, it was definitely a ballad, that's for sure. You know, I consider myself an extrovert, a very outgoing person. My mom is like that time's a hundred. My mom is personality and it's no surprise that her only son became a gay man, became a gay man, was born a gay man. We're very full. She would get a kick out of this, but we have a very funny story about when I was three years old. Once my mom was a queer. People were in our lives all the time. Like my mom, you know, many of many of her friends were queer. When I was growing up, and it's a very funny story, was about three years old and she put this in a book she wrote about her career last year. That came out last year, where I was three years old and divine showed up at our doorstep. Oh my God. Well, my God and my problematic. But I answered the door and I said, mom, there's something at the door, but I'm not sure what is. Of course waded through. Yeah, that would be proud thing to say now, but you know, as a three year old answering the door these you know that's what a three year old would say to divine showing up at your front door. But that's a funny story. I always left to joke about God's Great House growing up. You know what's a typical week as director of entertainment media at glad look like? Like? What what's the typical week for? Share that with us. That's a great questions. Of the great questions to get inside into the world of glad is there is no typical week. The best thing about my job that I love so much is that no two weeks or no two days or the same on any giving morning I wake up and I'm not sure you know what my day is going to look like. You know, for example, last week with everything about the Golden Globes, and we don't have to go into it too much. We could if you want to. Well thanks, but you know, it's like, you know, I couldn't have foreseen the way that glad was going to react to the Golden Globes or how we are going to approach the fact that the HPA did not have a single black member for two decades. And so it was like fascinating conversation with my co workers about, you know, what is glad's roll in this? You know, you know as an ally organization that stands up for social justice. Is How you know what you know. Are we going to put out a statement? Are we going to take action? What is the right course of course of action? How are we going to cover the Golden Globes this...

...year? Is How is it going to be different than how we've done it in past years in light of this new information? And that's just one example of, I think, the many ways that you know you never know it's coming, you never know. Putting in it really keeps you on your toes and you know, I had a fascinating conversation about a project I can't talk about with Netflix this morning and then we had a big conversation about the glad media awards and the video game category right after that. And and you know, every day is different. And I will say, and I think I said this in the interview with with Metro stores, is that I'm constantly learning and I turned forty five this year and to be constant in a job where you're constantly learning, I think is the greatest blessing, especially from the younger the younger folks are glad my younger co workers, who I'm constantly just blown away by. Well, I have to just say you make forty five look good. And when the article came out, I got so many DM's about the article and I'm like, Oh, you know, we talked about so many great issues and so many of them are like is he single? It's he single, it's he single? I'm like, calm down, bitches. So, Jeremy Autable, you've been behind the scenes of entertainment. You've also been a consumer of entertainment, like we said, from very young age. Now you have this big title for one of the most important organizations of our community and entertainment. There must be this huge pressure to always put your best foot forward in a super pc way, meaning you can't be honest if a movie bores you, the acting is bad or if film or TV show just isn't good. Is that hard? Because we know it's gay men, we're very opinionated. Is that? Is that hard? It's like God, you just can't just sit and be like God, that sucked. Yeah, I mean there are moments where I wish I could just go on twitter and be like this film sucks, Y'all. But again, it's going to reflect on glad. Right, we talked about exactly. Yeah, yeah, everything I say and do you will always reflect on glad and I'm very cognisant of that. And you know, it's funny we always say glad. You know, before social media, glad was very much a watched our group. With the advent of social media, we very much became a resource to Hollywood, totally, totally, you know, because gay twitter calls it out for us. We don't have to. Yeah, you know, twenty years glad was the only one calling it out on LGBTQ representation. Social media changed everything and so you know, it's very rare when we speak out against a project. So even if I were to speak out personally on my social media about something, it would be like, Oh, glad's you know, entertainment director hates this show or this film. So I am really cognisant about that. But I also, you know, somebody who's an artist myself, you know, who dapples in music and e Jang and producing. I have a tremendous amount of respect for any artist who puts themselves out there and you know, there was...

...a point in my life where I was much more publicly critical of things and, I guess, a little more jaded, but I have a tremendous respect for any creator in any field of artistry, and so I really try to rise it by above any negativity and if I have something I thought, you know, about, something crappy to say, I keep it with my co workers and will vent to each other, which is really my outlet, and they're out there, you know, those projects that could have done a lot better and you know, it's much more fun when I get up, when we get to publicly pray something that's really wonderful, which is what what we're more likely to do, and that's, you know, when something like disclosure comes along or the lady in the Dale and can they know which just came out? You know, they're all these great projects that we really get get to uplift to the community and beyond the community, and I really love that part of the job. Well, you do put a positive spin on everything. I tend to be more vocal. I don't have the responsibility that you do, and so I'm wondering, and this is a conversation I've had many, many times, off the record and on the record because, like you said, when you're in the privacy you can kind of share your opinions and get that venting out. But do you think, as LGBT could community, that we are just so happy to have representation out there that we're not holding ourselves accountable, we're not holding each other accountable and we pay less attention to quality of acting or the quality of content because we're just so happy to be on camera? I would say actually the opposite is true. At the same game in the year two thousand and twenty one, right, because you know, when I think about like when I first in turned to glad, which was in one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight, you know that was right, as I can't remember the year will and grace premiered, but it was right after Ellen and you know, yours, bulk and l word, hadn't even premiered yet. Or let's just say the period of early s when it would be like there's these, you know, a few shows with lgbtq characters or storylines on them, and now there's hardly a show on television that doesn't have at least one LGBTQ character. And so I think as a community we're holding ourselves to a much higher standard and not letting things go as much. You know, part of this has to do with the overall push for greater diversity, you know, from a complete intersectional perspective across you know, for all representation in all projects in Hollywood. But, you know, I really think we demand more at this point, you know, and and that the the representation that was good five years ago, ten years ago, twenty years ago doesn't necessarily hold up and and we all have to do better. And that's really where we have the glad media awards and why the glad medeo words, I think, are becoming so much bigger year over year in terms of what they mean to to a studio or network to win one is because we...

...do have these really high standards of impact and boldness of representation. You know, every year the hardest thing for me is like those, those those shows that were right on the bubble of getting a glad media or yeah, and it's like a couple of them. You know, we do reach out. We were like look, you were like, if we could have just had one more nominee, you would have been there. No, but there's so much great representation that to really get a glad media or nomination now you really have to go above and beyond and and also reflect the full intersectional diversity of the Els Community. And you know, when you said it, it really kind of clicked for me that glad did go from being like the tist test, test, like, you know, like this, like the school teacher, you know, waiting for you to mess up, but it's become a leader in positivity and being a consultant. You know, we were talking about the gaming industry. The gaming industry has changed and representation so much even in the last two years, and so I think glad as is positive kind of force. It makes us all, it makes people like me. That's quick to do, like a snappy one. Let you know liner about that movie was terrible. It makes me rethink what I'm coming from. But I'm going to be honest with you. Sometimes I've been attacked because I don't like a project or I think acting as bad. People automatically categorize me as transphobic or homophobic. And you know, we as gay journalists, can't just assume that people know that we're all inclusive. We just can't assume that anymore. I used to be like, Duh, I'm homophobic, I'm transphobic, please, I'm gay. That doesn't that doesn't mean anything anymore, because we've seen bigotry in our own community. But again, my opinion has just been discounted rather than no, I'm talking about the acting, I'm talking about the entertainment quality. Because I'm a consumer. It automatically gets categorized that you hate this group of people or that you're attacking this group of people. How do we change that? Wow, that is a that's a lot. You know, I guess if I were to give a short answer, it's one dialog at a time, right. It's it's you know, I don't know if there's there's a strong answer to this. Is The answer to changing it? I think it's nuance and it's communication and it's it's dialog with each other, both within the community and with content creators a large and within the industry. Right, I'll give an example. That's a recent example of a film I really loved but that other people in the Lgbtq community were highly critical of, and I think this is just emblematic what we're talking about right now, which is the film I care a lot, which just came out on Netflix. I just want, Oh God, Love, Love, love me too. So I bring it up and I single it out only because I also love this film. Now, several of my coworkers this film had tropes, right and glad. Is Always I always use the analogy. We point out the land mines to content creators and it's up to you, the content creator, to choose...

...whether or not to step on that land mine. But we're going to be a barometer, in a litmus test to you of the LGBTQ community, and they're likely reaction to things. Now I will say that we did not consult on this film. This was not a netflix original. It was a film that was was was produced in finance independently and picked up at Toronto by Netflix, and I really love this movie. I thought it was really fantastic. Rosamond Pike just want to Golden Globe. Take that with a fault, it being the Globes, but I thought it was deserved. I thought the acting was fantastic, but there were three tropes here right. One is sort of the villainous queer person too, is the I don't want to give any spoilers, but let's just say there's a trope out there called barrier gays, that that's a trope that we often draw attention to for Hollywood. And three, it's not really so much of a trope as much as something some people had issue, whish with, was straight actors playing queer roles, right, which is something that we talked about often, and the differences between transactors, says, actors playing fans roles, which is LGB, not lgb actors playing lgb roles. We could go out for an hour about that, but some people really just didn't want anything to do with that film. I'm talking some people from the community, not something right right because of those tropes. For me, I would say, but this was a really good film. Right. This said, it was a smart film with smart things to say about capitalism, about America, about casualderly and the elderly, casual representation of lgbtq people, which is something we call on often, which is like, this was not an lgbtq film. This was a film where the villains happened to be queer, but it was not a queer film. And I really like the movie. I thought was good filming. It was a perfect no, not by any means, but I thought it was a great movie. And so that just one example of like you know, you're not going to please you're going to please some people some of the time, but you're not going to please all people all the time with your art, and that's where I try to be really sensitive. I've never spoken the filmmakers. I don't know Jay Blakeson, who wrote and directed the film, but you know I really love the movie. So, Jay Blakeson, if you're watching, Rosamond, love movie. But you know, not everyone in the community did. And that's where I think dialog becomes so important and and looking at nuance and not saying that things are necessarily have to be all this or all that, but that there's room for, you know, the proverbial gray instead of the black and white in between. Well, and I tell you, I love casual representation. I think we're seeing a lot of it in commercials where, Oh, there's a gay couple and it just told as a matter of fact. It's not like this is the gay commercial, it's like, oh, it's part of it, and I think that we need more of that because characters. We as a gay community, we know there's villains in our community. There's every type of person in our community. So you know why, the more I think we integrate it as just part of the storyline, the more I think we're going to build bridges with viewers that are not exposed to lgbtq people...

...in real life on a regular basis. And it's just told matter of fact. This story was about something else. You know, that was part of her life and her love story, by the way, which you know, that was a positive aspect of her villainous her only source of love was this relationship, which I totally got, and it you know, it wasn't dependent on it being a lesbian relationship, it was just our relationship. Yeah, and you know, like Tracy Gilcrest, that tern chief of the advocate, loved it and, like, I know a lot of lesbians really love this movie right. Like there's and so I don't think you throw the baby out with the bath water. Yeah, tropes, because even though it's important to acknowledge those troops, you know. Okay, so you kind of brought up the subject and this has been such a hot topic and it's something I've talked about and I get so many kind of weird messages and good messages and informative messages. But we're talking about is there a double standard where we're talking about gay representation? James Gordon was in the prom and everybody went crazy saying, oh, this is why you shouldn't have a straight man playing a gay man. Awful, awful, awful. But then we have Paul bettany playing and nailing it as uncle frank and everybody is happy and what a beautiful movie. Everybody needs to see this movie. There wasn't that same conversation. So aren't we just talking about acting quality or are we talking about representation and do we have double standards? Is it a fair conversation? Yeah, and again I just go back to it's a project by project situation. Right. I mean, I think I can't remember I said this an article, but I counted like seventeen projects that could be lgbtq inclusive and consideration for the Academy Awards this year, you know again, you know, not just Paul Bettany but Viola Davis and Er Day playing by women and their respective films this year, Family Teaching and Colin Firth and Super Nova, Kate Winslett UNs in Ronin and in ammonite. There's so many this year. And straight actors playing gay roles. And and again this is where the conversation gets super interesting. Right. I think what struck a chord with the James Cordon situation, which, by the way, most of the criticism I saw against Gordon's performance was from SIS gender gay white men, which is fine, of which I am one. But you know, I felt like it's struck this chord of shame and people like very velvet road type stuff, you know, a straight actor playing an over the top effeminate gay character that dealt in stereotypes that probably we're triggering for some people. And and and we could go a whole nother podcast episode about about shame and and I've been listening a lot of Brunet Brown late lately. So shame and vulnerability and and whatnot. But I think that, you know the...

...reason why Gordon's getting more criticized than, say, Yola Davis or under day for playing by women it is is that that that role struck struck something for people. And and and so I again I don't think there's like I don't think you can say straight actors shouldn't play LGB roles the same way you can say SIS actor should not play Trans rules is they're very distinct differences and reasons for that. But I think every role has to be looked at on a case by case basis. And I do think, you know, Russell t davies just came out with a very big statement when it's a sin dropped out about I purposefully only cast gay actors. And at the same time I have all these studios coming to me saying, like we can't ask an actor in their audition the audition room about their sexual orientation. It's illegal to do so, which it is. You know, you cannot say, are you gay when you're auditioning for a role? Are you by are you lesbian? You know so it's nuanced and every situation is different. Is My only and non answer answer of that. Well, and my whole thing, like, like you said, you know, we have all these movies for contenders as Academy Awards. Some of your favorite projects that you listed will never see the light of day in a huge mainstream or to a whole, a huge mainstream audience. And so if we want our stories told on a on a in a huge way, I think sometimes we do have to rely on star power. Thank God we have bigger names that are coming out as LGBTQ. So we are taking baby steps to that. But you know, when the whole scarlet Johanson thing happened, I said, okay, then give me another a list transactor that we can replace, because we know it's a business at the end of the day. You need people to finance the film, you need people to distribute the film and sometimes if you don't have a major name, it'll never get made or if it does get made, it's going to be shown to a very small percentage of the audience. We're going to be preaching to the choir, and so I think that that's important to my favorite part of that story, the film was Robin Tag in two thousand and eighteen. Is that? This past ball it was announced that it's going to be redone as a TV series, with our lady j show running it and a transmail actor who's not yet been announced in the leading role. That's been in the trade. So that's, you know, public. Ever, I had no clue. You aren't. You are the break of the bringer of a news. Yeah, well, it's like there's always a solution, right. It's like you know, if you've watched disclosure, you know if you can find a transactor for your role, you're not looking hard enough. You know right, and you know whether it's like. Okay, so it's not going to be a blockbuster film with Scarlett Johanson starring as a sister gender woman and a transgender maile role, but guess what, you were able to pivot the project adapted to television and find a way where it could be the next pose for all...

...we know. Yeah, you know, it's funny. When brokeback mountain came out, I saw that I didn't know how graphic it was going to be, but I thought with my grandma and the only reason she went to see it was because she knew the names that were the stars and she loved them right. And so we saw this very eye opening film for her which dealt with a lot of issues, but because it had that kind of star power in a comfortable from comfortable actors, you know, that she felt comfortable with she had seen their work. That's the only reason she went to see the film and she was better for it. Our relationship was better for it as well. All those very uncomfortable sitting next to my grandma. There is the sex. This makes it. You know, where did it come? I love that. I love hearing that. You know, I wonder if broke back would have the same impact if it came out in two thousand and twenty one that it didn't. That is a very interesting height. You know, in two thousand and five absolutely and Lgbtq rights and as a Social Justice Movement, we were in such a different place, right. Yeah, and so I you know, I broke back did amazing things back then and I and I think the film still holds up as a film, but I wonder if it would have had the same impact if it came out now that it did. That that is a very, very interesting comment. Okay, so you know, sitting here in the middle of the day talking about these issues. You've already been to work this morning talking about another huge project. You probably are going to go on to talk about something you know big for this afternoon in your personal life, and I'm going to go text my friend about real housewives of New Jersey. There's a just a different pressure that you have all day. How do you deal with a term? This is what I call activist fatigue, where every conversation you have is heavy. I'm sure when you go to a cocktail party somebody wants to ask you these issues because they want to know what the expert has to say or what a piece way to say. At every panel you're on, every party you go to, every email you send has to have this kind of heaviness. How do you deal with this activist fatigue and how do you kind of unwind and take a breath from it all? It's exhausting, it is, and thank you for asking that and acknowledging that, because not just myself but all of my co workers are clad. It can really be heavy stuff. You know, every day when we have, you know, our daily staff meetings, and we're talking about the news the day and what's going on. Like oftentimes we're dealing with hate crimes or anti violence and like you know, you know now all the awful bills that anti you know, Trans High School athlete bills that are popping up all over the country, and it can, you know, I don't want to call it like PTSD, but it does. That's anyone working in nonprofit, I think, has this issue that they have to constantly process, which is, you know, if I'm constantly working on this, cause how do I process absorbing at all and take in, you know, dealing with it? And the truth is you have to be really active about selfcare, like...

...really really being close to yourself emotionally and like for me, that's I'm in therapy every week. I have a therapist I have a long term relationship with who I trust and I can really bounce things off of, because I think mental health is super important for all of us and you know, some days I just need to be like yeah, I need a massage this week. You know, it's self care is so important and so underrated, especially in the Lgbtq community, where we're all dealing with trauma and some form, to whatever degree, and so I rely on my coworkers. I really rely on my coworkers. I alluded to that before. They're really amazing people and and I would say I'm to work it glad you have to, you know, have a really big heart and be really sensitive and and and feel very deeply, and it's that reason that we are people who feel very deeply that we work there, and at the same time, that's also what we used to help support each other. I think that's so important and it's also important for us from the Community who rely on our activists to come to with a pride be, you know, visible at especially during this last pride season, I know a lot of celebrities that were exhausted because they could attend, so to speak, every pride. But then we know that there's an exhaustion that comes with a zoom and then always having to be on, always having to bepc. We demand a lot from our activists as well and it's important for us to realize that they need downtime and if they say no to a certain event for something, they probably just kind of need a breath. So last before I go. So you've done the AIDS life cycle ten times. I've dated people that have done the ride. I won't even go on a hike if it's not an open bar. But I've heard it's an amazing experience, but it's also very grueling. Why do you do it year after year and what aspect gets easier what aspect gets harder? That's a great question and unfortunately, for the second year in a row, there will not be in in person. YEA, which is why the LA lgbt center and the San Francisco AIDS foundation need our donations so much this year. In their place, there's going to be something called together ride this year in which you go out your cycle on your own and raise money still to support the life saving services that those sort of direct service organizations are providing here on the west coast, just two of many organizations doing this great work. You know, I felt I firsted, I did my first AIDS life cycle in two thousand and eight. I just fell in love with the community at first. I you know, it's Threezero people that go down the coast for seven days every year and I was like, Oh, this is my people, this is where I'm to be. You know, I learned so much more about HIV, aid stigma through ten times participating in the ride and, moreover, about those aforementioned life saving services that the center and the SFA, SFA provide. It's what gets harder is that my body's getting older, and let me tell you that. But...

...the great thing about cycling is IT'S A it's like every year the youngest participant is eighteen and the oldest participant usually is usually in their s, because cyclings and activity that, if you take care of your body, you can do. Yeah, for sure, running we're like your knees might start hurting. Cycling you can do for a long time and it's a really social event. That's like the biggest misconception is that I think some people think the AIDS life cycle is a race, when in fact it's like super social and like I'm usually like coming in at the back of the pack every day to camp because, like, I take my time, but the rest stop and and really take the time to watch the drag shows they have going on in the middle of the ride. Yeah, it's just a community and I fell in love with this community early on and I think I'll be a part of this community as long as it keeps happening, so that the my love. What gets easier is my love for the for this community and and the support and what I get back from the people and wor gets harder is my body. My Body. Eight okay, before they got let's play a little rapid fire. Are you ready? Yeah, I'm ready. So, as a DJ, we know that you are defici on Aldo, on music. So you are asked to play one artist for an entire club night. What artist would you choose? Kind even know? Okay, what is a personal totem that you take with you on every age life cycle? A stuffed plug. Oh now they're all over my house. What is your guilty pleasure movie? So bad it's good. Oh God, that's such a good question. So bad it's good. Drop the gorgeous and they just added this HBO Max. By the way, what was the name of your biography be? Thus far, my biography life in music and storytelling. I think we could punch it up a little bit spot I can. But what's the funniest interview red carpet experience that you've had? And I know you've been on many, many red carpets, both on it and behind it. Oh Gosh, I think once I was like forced to ask Warren Beatty about a potential affair and he, Oh my God, hold me to fuck off and moved, as he should. What is the celebrity news ways? Lord? All right, Jeremy, tell everybody where they can finde you on twitter, instagram, DJ blacklow. My instagram is very much just about music and Djing. My twitter is much more about glad and my life's work in LGBTQ media. Thank you. Thank you so...

...much for taking time out of your day to talk with us. It's such a pleasure speaking with you and thank you for everything that you do for the community. It's truly my honor, Alexander. It's been so great meeting you through this process. I'm so fitter and honored that you took the time to highlight my work and the work I do. It clad so truly the pleasure of mind is mine. Thank you. Wo that has been my chat with Jeremy Black Law. You can read my in depth interview with him in our last issue of Metro source, on newstands around the nation or at Metro sourcecom. That's our episode. I'm your host, Alexander Rodriguez. You can find me on Instagram at Alexander's on air. Until next time, stay true, do you. Boom. That has been another metro source mini like. Share, subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latest issue of Metro Sports magazine on newstands or online at Metro sportscom. Follow us on Facebook, instagram at natural source and on twitter at Metro course mad until next time, he fas.

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