Jeremy Blacklow - Director of Entertainment Media for GLAAD

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jeremy Blacklow joined GLAAD in 2017 as Director of Entertainment Media, where he serves as a liaison between GLAAD and the film, television, music, and gaming sectors, working to ensure that the industry is equipped to leverage GLAAD’s research and resources to bring about fair, inclusive, accurate, and diverse representations of LGBTQ people and issues. 

Prior to joining GLAAD, Jeremy worked for 17 years as a journalist, with a focus in entertainment news. He began his career in New York City at NBC’s Weekend Today show, and has worked for CNN, Telepictures, and NBC Universal. He helped launch the TMZ brand and the CAA-created digital agency WhoSay in. Jeremy spent five years as Managing Editor of AccessHollywood.com and later spearheaded the editorial relationship between Yahoo! and CBS’s The Insider, appearing frequently on-air as a contributor.

In recent years, Jeremy has worked as a digital marketing consultant, while also freelance writing for publications including Variety, TheWrap, and ETOnline. He’s a proud 10-time AIDS/LifeCycle participant, an electronic music producer and a DJ.  

We chatted with Jeremy about it ALL: the future of LGBTQ representation in the media, double standards with gay casting, activism fatigue, the AIDS Lifecycle, being PC, and even being single. Tune in!  

This is metrosourcementy the officialpodcast to Metrosource magazine and home of short form interviews with yourfavorite personalities from the lgbtq world and Beo Quick Fun and informative.It's metral source on the go out in cowsince, Likwell, hello, hello, hello.This is Alexander, Rodri gets lead rider for Metrosource magazine and Abitpodcaster during covid. There has been one industry that has been getting usthrough this, I'm not talking about postmates, but thank you postmates. Italkng about entertainment, NEW YORK, Post New York Post reported that theaverage American is watching eight hours a day of content, and we knowthat we've experienced a boom in lgbtq representation and also a boom in lgbtqentertainment people coming out of the closet of all of this energe going on, andtoday our guest is director of entertainment, media for Glad Jeremy,Black Lob. He joined glad in two thousand and seventeen as director ofentertainment media where he serves as Leazon between glad and the filmtelevision, music and even gaming sectors. He works toward sure that theindustry is equipped to leverage glass, research and resources to bring aboutfair, inclusive, accurate and diverse representation of lgbtq people andissues. Prior to glad he worked as a journalist with a focus, entertainmentnews. He began his career in New York City at nbcs weekend today show and hasworked for CNN telepictures in NBC Universal. He helped launch the TMZbrand and also the CAA created digital agency buse. He spent five years asmanaging editor of xes hollywoodcom and later spearheaded. The editorialrelationship between Yahoo and cabs is the insider appeared frequently on airas a contributor. In recent years he has worked as a digital marketingconsultant Whileso, freelance writing for publications, including variety,the wrap and et online es a proud ten time, AIDS life cycle participant inelectronic music producer and a DJ, Hey, Mr Dj put a record on. We can haveJeremy Black loud here, Hey! Thank you for Haing Etoday, of course.So I wantt know what it's like to sit back and listen to your resume kind ofrecited to you. Ov Do so much in your career so like who is this guy on a youknow, youiubut, so many aspects of entertainment from you know funcelebrity gossip, but you know to presidential elections the Iraq war.What was that turning point in your career, where it kind of clicked foryou and you're like okay? My Path is clear: I'm here to make a name formyself. What was that turning point? For you? That's a great question. I mean youknow. I really come from the same background that you come from Alexander.I was a journalist, you know and and my whole dream. My whole life was just toget into journalism and to do meaningful work and then very early on.I found myself gravitating towards entertainment because, like you, I love,entertainment and Love Hollywood. I...

...love storytelling and, and reallythat's. You know whether you're a hard news, journalist or you're in themiddle of Hollywood, like, like my careers, gone direction of being. You know at the end of the day, atstorytelling right at the end of the day, the thing at all how Hasin commonis the humanity and and being really committed to that art ofstorytelling, whether you're, the one telling the story or helping someonetell the story or working. You know in this weird ecosphere that we callthe entertainment industry, and so you know for me, I really just you know, did the journalism thing fora long time, and then I hit that point in my s where I needed somethingdifferent and when the opportunity to go work for glad full time came alongit all clicked and I was like Oh, this is what I want to be doing with my liferight now and I haven't really looked back since now. What was it aboutjournalism like when you were a kid? was there like a new segment? You sawor was it you know, like entertainment tonight as a kid?What was it about journalism that really kind of sparked your entrance?In that? That's a really good question actually, and we didn't really get intothis in the amazing profile that I'm so grateful that you wrote. You wrote forme a metrosforst which my family and friends are so crodive, so it was sofun to write it was. I was very honored. Thank you. My mom was a terss actually reating wow.My mom was an on air anchoren reporter at the NBCN affiliate in Seattle,Washington and she was one of the first journalists ever to appear on airpregnant n. In the mid s with me, and I sort of grew up in a newsroom like Iliterally, would go after school some days. You know my parents were divorced.My you know a lot of the time I was with my mom and I basically grew up inthe kingfive newsroom in Seattle, Washington and was surrounded bytelevision journalism. My whole life and you know in a Pre Internet era. Iwould watch the today show all the time and like sort of fell in love withwatching like Jane Pouly and Briant Gumble and thenit an mal. Our on thetoday show and, like my whole life I was like I'mgoingto work for the today show one day and sure enough. I did I intern forthem when I was in college living in New York City and then you know, went and got my first job outof school working for the today ship so that that you know sort of watching itand being around it and being around journalists all the time. I always sortof thought all my mom's coworkers were so cool. They swere all the time andthey an like, like I was like yeah. This isa career path for me and that's kind of how I felnd love with it. So Jeremy I'man attention Hor, but I'm also a mama's...

...boy. What was it like? Having a mom,I'm sure she was so busy if she wasn't on camera doing she was doing herresearch. You know she was probably always always working and did you feellike you had to share her attention with the world or was it just kind ofexciting, because I would have been like hello I'm over here, yeah, it Wa,definitely abalace. That's for sure. You know. I consider myself an EXREVAT,a very ougoing person. My mom is like that times. A hundred my mom ispersonnality, and it's no surprise that her only sonbecame a game. Man became a game. An was porn a Gamean word very close. She would get a kick out ofthis, but we have a very funny story about when I was three years old oncemy mom was queer people weare in our lives all the time. Like my mom, youknow many afd, many of her friends were queer when I was growing up- and it wasa very funny story- was about three years old and she put this in a bookshe wrot about her career last year that came out last year, where I wasthree years old and divine showed up at our doorstep. Oh, my God, Ondo Goanproblematic, but I answere the door and I said mom there's something at thedoor, but I'm not sure what is of course is to Yehino say now, but youknow as a three year old answering the DOORAS idies. You know that's what athree year old would say to divine showing up at your front door, butthat's a funny story. I always want to joke about my God. Thats Ol Housegrowing up. You know what's a typical week as director ofentertainment media at glad. Look like like what what's the typical weeksshare that with us. That's a grat question that' one of thegreat questions, a get insight into e the world of glad is. There is notypical leag the best poing about my job, that I love. So much is that notwo weeks or or two days are the same on any giving morning. I wake up andI'm not sure you know what my day is going to look like. You know, forexample, last week with everything about the golden glows and we don'thave to go into it too much. We could, if you want to wel thanks t you know it's like you know, Icouldn't have foreseen the way that glad was going to react to the GoldenGlobes or how we were going to approach the fact that the HFPA did not have asingle black member for two decades, and so it was like fascinatingconversation with my coworkers about you know what is glad's rolling this.You know you know as an Alli Organization that stands up for socialjustice, how you know what it you know. Are we going to put out of statement?Are we going to take action? What is the right course, of course, of action?How are we going to cover the Golden...

Gobes this year is how is it going tobe different than how we've done it in past years? In Lat of this newinformation, and that's just one example of I think the many ways thatyou know you never know. What's coming, you never knowwing, and it really keepsyou on your toes and you know I had a you know fascinating conversation abouta project. I can't talk about with Netflix this morning and then we had abig conversation about the glad media wards and the video game category right afterthat, and- and you know every day is different, and I will say- and I think I said this inthe interview with with metrospourcs- is that I'm constantly learning- and Iturned forty five this year and to be constant in a job where you'reconstantly learning, I think, is the greatest blessing, especially from the younger, theyounger folks, a clad, my younger coworkers, I'm constantly just blownaway by well, I have to just say you make fortyfive look good and when the article came out, I got so many dms about thearticle and I'm like. Oh you know, we talked that so many great issues, andso many of them are like. Is He single? Is He single? It's e single, I'm likecom down bitches, so j you've been behind the scenes ofentertainment. You've also been a consumer of entertainment. Like we saidfrom very young age. Now you have this big title for one of the most importantorganizations of our community and entertainment. There must be this hugepressure to always put your best foot forward in a super pc way mean youcan't be honest: If a movie bores you the acting is bad or if film or TV showjust isn't good. Is that hard? Because we know its game man we're veryopinionated? Is that is that hard? It's like God, you just can't just sit andbe like God that sucked yeah I mean there are moments where I wish. I could just go ontwitter and be like this film sucks youall. But again it's going to reflecton glad right. We talked roght exactly yeah yeah everything I say you do, willalways reflect I'm glad, and I'm very cognizant of that, and you know it's funny. We always sayglad you know before social media glad was very much a watchdog group with theadvent of social media. We very much became a resource to Hollywood totallytotally. You know because Gaye twitter calls it out for us. We don't have toyeah. You know twenty years glad was the only one calling it out on LGPTQrepresentation. Social media changed everything, and so you know it's very riawhen. We speakout against a project, so even if I were to speak out personally on mysocial media about something it would be like. Oh glads, you knowentertainment, director hates this show or this film. So I am really cognizantabout that. But I also you know somebody who's, an artist myself. Youknow who dabbles in music and Yjing and producing. I have a tremendous amountof respect for any artist who puts themselves out there, and you knowthere was a point in my life where I...

...was much more publicly critical ofthings and I guess a little more jaded, but I have a tremendous respect for anycreator in any field of artistry, and so I really try to rise at by above anynegativity. And if I have something a thought you know about something crappyto say: I keep it with my coworkers and we'll ventto each other, which is really Y, my outlet andthey're out there. You know those projects, th t that could have done alot better and you know it's much more fun. When I get up when we get topublicly pray, something that's really wonderful, which is what M, what we'remore likely to do? And that's you know when something likedisclosure comes along or the lady in the Dale in Paneno, which just came out.You know therere all these great projects that we really Gat get touplift, that to the community and beyond the community, and I really lovethat part of the job. Well, you do put a positive spin on everything I tend tobe more vocal. I don't have the responsibility that you do, and so I'mwondering- and this is a conversation- I've had many many times off the recordand on the record because, like you said when you're in the privacy, youcan kind of share your opinions and get that venting out. But do you think is elgbt community that we are just so happy to have representation out therethat we're not holding ourselves accountable, we're not holding eachother accountable and we pay less attention to quality of acting or thequality of content, because we're just so happy to be on camera. I would say absolutely. The opposite istrue. At Tho in am in the year two thousand and twenty one right, becauseyou know when I think about like when I first interned, O glad which Ias in onethousand nine hundred and ninety eight. You know that was right, as God. Ican't remember the year, will and grace premier, but it was right after Ellen,and you know the others Olk and e El word, hadn't, even premiered, yet orlet's just say the period of the early two sands when it would be like.There's these. You know a few shows with lgbtq characters or storylines onthem, and now there's hardly a show on television that doesn't have at leastone ltbtq character, and so I think, as a community we're holding ourselves toa much higher standard and not letting things go as much. You know. Part of this has to do withthe overall push for greater diversity. You know from a complete intersectionalperspective across you know for all representation in all projects inHollywood, but you know, I really think we demand more at this point you know andand that the the representation that was good five years ago ten years ago,twenty years ago, doesn't necessarily hold up and- and we all have to dobetter and that's really why we have the Glod media wards and why the gladVedeo wors, I think, are becoming so much bigger year over year in terms of whatthey mean to to a studio or network to win. One is because we do have thesereally high standards of impact and...

...boldness of representation. You know every here. The hardest thingfor me is like those those those shows that were righton the bubble of getting a glad, media or yeah, and it's like a couple of them. Youknow we do reach out and we were like look. You were like if we could have just had one morenomine, you would have been there, but there's so much greatrepresentation that' to really get a clad, mediaw r nomination. Now youreally have to go above and beyond, and and also reflect the fullintersectional diversity of Thatas on pop community, and you know when yousaid it, it really kind of clicked for me that glad did go from being like theTististisk. Like you know like this, like the school teacher, you knowwaiting for you to mess up, but it's become a leader in positivity and beinga consultant. You know we're even talking about the gaming industry. Thegaming industry has changed an representation so much even in the lasttwo years, and so I think glad as is positive kind of force. It makes us allit makes people like me. That's quick to do like a snappy one. Le You know,liner about h. That movie was terrible. It makes me rethink what I'm comingfrom, but I'm going to be honest with you. Sometimes I've been attackedbecause I don't like a project or I think acting is bad peopleautomatically categorize me as transphobic or homophobic, and you knowwe as gay journalists, can't just assume that people know that we're allinclusive. We just can't assume that anymore. I used to be like da I'mhomophobic, I'm transphobic, please, I'm gay that doesn't that doesn't meananything anymore because we've seen bigotry in our own community but againmy opinion has just been discounted rather than no I'm talking about theacting I'm talking about the entertainment quality, because I'm aconsumer, it automatically gets categorized that you hate this group ofpeople or that you're attacking this group of people. How do we change that? Wow? That is a that's a Lotyou know. Iguess if I were to give a short answer, it's one dialogue at a time right, it's you know, I don't know if there'sthere's a strong answer to this is the answer to to changing it. I think it'snuance and it's communication and it's it's dialogue with each other, bothwithin the community and with content creators a large and within theindustry right I'll give an example. That's a recent example of a film Ireally loved, but that other people in the Lgbtq community were highlycritical of, and I think this is just emblematic what we're talking aboutright now, which is the film I care a lot which just came out on Netflix. Ijust want, Oh God, Love Love, love me t, so I bring it up and I single it outonly because I also love this film. Now several of my co workers, this film hadtropes right and glad is always. I always use the analogy. We point outthe landlines to content creators and it's up to you the contact creator tochoose whether or not to step on that...

...landlint, but we're going to be abarometer and a litmus test to you of the Lgbtq community and their likelyreaction of things. Now I will say that we did not consult on this film. Thiswas not a netflix original. It was a film that was was was producing financeindependently and picked up at Toronto by Netflix, and I really love thismovie. I thought it was really fantastic. Rosamand Pike just wont toGolven Glob. Take that with a Palti being the gloves, but I thought it wasdeserved. I thought the acting was fantastic, but there were three tropeshere right. One is sort of the villainous queer person to is the. I don't want to give any spoilers, but,let's just say, there's a trip out there called barrier gays, that's atrope that we often draw attention to for Hollywood and three, it's notreally so much of a trope as much as something some people had issue with,with with straight actors playing queer roles right, which is something that wetalk about often, and the differences between transactors siys actors playingtransreols versus LG, non lgv actors playing ougb rolls. We could go out foran hour about that, but some people really just didn't, wantanything to do with that film. I'm talking to some people from thecommunity N, that's on breat right right because of those trips. For me, Iwould say that this was a really good film right. This SAI was a smart filmwith smart things to say about capitalism about America aboutCasalterly, an the elderly, casual representation of lgbtq people, whichis something we call on often which is like this was not an lgbtq film. Thiswas a film where the villains happened to be queer, but it was not a queerfilm and I really liked the movie. I thought it was good filming it was itperfect, no not by any means, but I thought it was a great movie, andso that's just one example of like you know: you're not going to please you'regoing to please some people, some of the time, but you're not going toplease all people all the time with your art and that's where I try to bereally sensitive. I've never spoken the filmmakers, I don't know J Blakeson whowrote and directed the film, but you know I really love the movie, so JaBlakeson, if you're watching Rosamond lo movie- but you know not, everyone inthe community- did and that's where I think, dialogue become so important andand looking at nuance and not saying that things are necessarily have to be all this or all that, butthat there's room for you know the proverbial gray instead of the blackand white in between well, I'm Gi, tell you, I love casualrepresentation. I think we're seeing a lot of it in commercials where Ohthere's a gay couple and it st it just told. As matter of fact, it's not likethis is the gay commercial. It's like. Oh it's part of it, and I think that weneed more of that because characters we as a gay community. We know there'svillains in our community, there's every type of person in our community.So you know why the more I think weintegrate it as just part of the storyline, the more I think we're goingto build bridges with viewers that are...

...not exposed to lgbtq people in reallife on a regular basis, and it's just told matter of fact this story wasabout something else. You know that was part of Hor life and her love story bythe way which you know. That was a positive aspect of her villainous. Heronly source of love was this relationship, which I totally got andit you know it wasn't dependent on it being an lesbian relationship. It wasjust a relationship yeah and you know like Tracy Gocrest, that terd I shiepof the advocate loved it and, like I know a lot of lesbians. H really lovethis movie right like there's, and so I don't thank you, throw the baby outwith the bath water, je t tropes, because even though it's important toacknowledge those trups, you know okay, so you kind of brought up the subject, andthis has been such a hot topic and it's something I've talked about, and I getso many kind of weird messages and good messages and informative mesages, butwe're talking about. Is there a double standard when we're talking about gamerepresentation, James Cordon was in the prom and everybody went crazy, sayingOh, this is why you shouldn't have a straight man playing a gay man, awfulawful awful, but then we have Paul betmy playing and nailing it as unclefrank and everybody is happy and what a beautiful movie everybody needs to seethis movie there wasn't that same conversation. So aren't we just talkingabout acting quality or are we talking about representation and do we havedouble standards? Isn't a fair conversation? Yeah and again, I just goback to its project by project situation. Right I mean I think I can't remember if I said this.An article, but I counted like seventeen projects that could be lgbtqinclusive in consideration for the academy words is here, you know again,you know not just Paul Betny, but Vioa Davis, an underday playing by women andtheir respective films. This year, Family Toche, an Colin furth andSupernova Kay whinsler, I ungin Ronan in Amonite, there's so many this yearand straight actors playing gay roles and again this is where theconversation gets. Cuper interesting right. I think what struck accord withthe James Cordon situation, which, by the way most of the criticism altpaagainst cordon's performance, was from SIS gender, gay white men, which isfine, of which I am one. But you know I felt like it struck this cord of shame in people like very velvet, Ri type stuff. You know a straight actor playing andover the top affeminate gay character that dealt in stereotypes that probablywere triggering for some people and and and we could go a whole nother podcast episode aboutabout shame. A and I've been listening, a lot of Bernabe around lite, Latelys,so shame and vulnerability...

...and whatnot. But I think that you know the reason whycordon's getting more criticized than say, Bioladavis or underday for playingby women is. Is that that that role structstruck something for people and and and so again I don't think there's like. Idon't think you can say straight actors shouldn't play LGV roles the same way.You can say SIS actor should not play transrules GIS, their very distinctdifferences and reasons for that. But I think every role has to be looked aton a case by case basis, and I do think you know. Russellt dabies just came outwith a very big statement when it's a sin dropped Pucan come out about. Ipurposely only cast gay actors and, at the same time, have all these studioscoming to me saying like we can't ask an actor in their addition. Theaddition room about their sexual onientation, it's illegal to do so,which it is you know you cannot say. Are you gay when you're auditioning fora role? Are you by Ar you lesbian? You know. So it's a nuance and everysituation is different. Is My only non answer. Answer that well and my wholething like, like you said you know, we have all these movies for contenders asacademy wards. Some of your favorite projects that you listed will never seethe light of day in a huge mainstream or to a whole huge, mainstream audience,and so, if we want our stories told on a in a huge way, I think sometimes wedo have to rely on star power. Thank God. We have bigger names that arecoming out as Lgbtq, so we are taking baby steps to that. But you know whenthe whole scarlet, Jo handsome thing happened. I said okay, then give meanother a list transactor that we can replace, because we know it's abusiness. At the end of the day, you need people to finance the film. Youneed people to distribute the film, and sometimes, if you don't have a majorname, it'll never get made or if it does get made, it's goingto be shown to a very small percentage of the auditce we're going to bepreaching to the choir, and so I think that that's important to my favoritepart of that story. The film was Robin Tog in two thousand, and eighteen isthat this pastball it was announced that it's going to be redone as a TVseries with our lady j show running it and a transmail actor who's not yetbeen announced in the leading role. That's been in the trade, so that's youknow public over. I had no clue you are. You are the bre, the BRINGER UF NewsYeah? Well, it's like there's always a solution right. It's like you know. Ifyou watch disclosure, you know if you can't find a transactor for your role,you're, not looking hard enough. You know right and you know whether it'slike okay, so it's not going to be a blockbuster film with Scarlet JoeHanson starring as a Assistaner woman hat a trangender mal role but guest.What youere able to pivot the project adapted to television and find a waywhere it could be the next pose for all...

Yo know yeah. I you know it's funny.When broke back mountain came out. I saw that I didn't know how graphic itwas going to be, but I sat with my grandma and the only reason she went tosee it was because she knew the names that were the stars and she loved themright, and so we saw this very eye opening film for her, whichdealt with a lot of issues, but because it had that kind of star power in acomfortable from comfortable actors. You know that she felt comfortable withshe had seen their work. That's the only reason she went to see the filmand she was better for it. Our relationship was better for Itd as well.Altho was very uncomfortable, siting next to my grandma during the sex S,Nex IDs, you know where itg. I love that I love hearing that you know. I wonder if brokeback wouldhave the same impact if it came out in two thousand and twenty one, that itdidn't Thatsa very interesting hate. You know two thousand and fiveabsolutely and ldbtq rights and as a social justice moment, we were in sucha different place right a and so I you know I broke back. Did amazing thingsback then, and I and I think the film still holds up as a film, but I wonderif it would have had the same impact if it came out now that it did that. Thatis a very, very interesting comment. Okay, so you know sitting here in themiddle of the day talking about these issues, you've already been to workthis morning. Talking about another huge project, you probably are going togo on to talk about something you know big for this afternoon in your personallife and I'm going to go text. My friend about real housewives of NewJersey, there's a just a different pressurethat you have all day. How do you deal with the term? This is what I callactivist fatigue where every conversation you have is heavy, I'msure when you go to a cocktail party, somebody wants to ask you these issuesbecause they want to know what the expert has to say or what a pc way tosay it. Every panel you're on every party you go to every email you sendhas to have this kind of heaviness. How do you deal with this activist fatigueand how do you kind of unwind and take a breath from it all it'sexhausting? It is, and thank you for asking that and acknowledging that,because not just myself, but all of my coworkers are clad. It can really be heavy stuff. You knowevery day when we have you know our daily staff meetings and we're talkingabout the news of the day and what's going on like oftentimes we're dealingwith eight crimes or antican violence and, like you know, you know now allthe awful bills tha anti. You know: Trans High School Athlete Bills thatare popping up all over the country, and it can you know I don't want tocall it like PTSD, but it it does. That's anyone working in onprofit, Ithink, has this issue that they have to constantly process, which is you knowif I'm constantly working on this cause? How do I process absorbing at all andTakin, and you know dealing with it and the truth? Is You have to be reallyactive about self care, llike really really being close toyourself emotionally and like for me?...

That's I I mean therapy. Every week Ihave a therapist. I have a long term relationship with who I trust, and Ican really bounce things off of, because I think mental health is superimportant for all of us, and you know some days. I just need to belike yeah, I mean a massage this week. You know it's Selfcare is so importantand so underrated, especially in the Lgvtq community, where we're alldealing with trauma in some forms to whatever degree, and so I rely on mycoworkers. I really rely on my coworkers. I alluded to that before.They're really amazing people and- and I would say to work at glad you have toyou- know- have a really big heart and be really sensitive and and and feelvery deeply, and it's that reason that we are people who feel very deeply thatwee worked there and at the same time that's also what we use to help supporteach other. I think that's so important and it's also important for us from theCommunity who rely on our activist to come to with the prides, be. You knowvisible at especially during this last pride season. I know a lot ofcelebrities that were exhausted because they could attend so to speak everypride, but then we know that there's an exhaustion that comes with zoom andthen always having to be on always having a BPC. We demand a lot from ouractivist as well, and it's important for us to realize that they needdowntime and if they say no to a certain event or something theyprobably just kind of need, a breath. So last before I go so you've done theAIDS Libecycle ten times I've dated people that have done the right. Iwon't even go on a hike if it's not an open bar, but I've heard it's an amazingexperience, but it's also very grueling. Why do you do it year after year andwhat aspect gets easier? WHAT ASPECT GETS HARDER? That's a great question, andunfortunately, for the second year in a row, there will not be an Inperson E,which is why the LA lgbt center and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation NeedArnonation. So much is here in their place. There's going to be somethingcalled together right this year in which you go out you cycle on your ownand raise money still to support the life saving services that those sort ofdirect service organizations are providing here on the west coast, justto Haf many organizations doing this great work. You know I felt I firstdid. I did myfirsday's life cycle in twothousand and eight D. I just fell in love with thecommunity at first, I you know it's threethousand people that go down thecoast for seven days. Every year- and I was like Oh, this is my people. This iswhere I to be. You know I learned so much more about Hib a stigma throughten times participating in the ride and, moreover, about those afformange andlife saving services that the center and the SFA SFA provide it's. What gets harder is that mybody's getting older- and...

...let me tell you that, but the greatthing about cycling is it's a it's like every year the youngest participant iseighteen and the oldest participant usually is usually in their s, becausecyclings and activity that, if you take care of your body, you can do mot yeahfor sore running were like your knees, might start hurting cycling. You can dofor a long time and it's a really social event. That's like the biggestmisconception is that I think some people think the it's lifecycle is therace when, in fact it's like super social and like I'm usually like comingin at the back of the pack every day to camp because, like I take my time butthe rest of stop and and really take the time to watch the drag shows theyhave going on in the middle of the ride. Yeah, it's just a community and I fell inlove with this community early on and I think ie'll be a part of this community as long as it keeps happening so that th my love. What gets easier is mylove for for this community and and the support and what I get back from thepeople and workets harder. Is My Body Mabodi? Okay, before Lik go, let's play alittle rappit fire? Are you ready, yeah, I'm Roy? So as a DJ, we know that youare in a Fiscianodo on music, so you are asked to play one artist for anentire club night. What artist would you choose? Kiemen, O? Okay, what is a personaltotum that you take with you on every age life cycle, a stuffed, pug e, now they're all over my house. What is your guilty pleasure movie? Sobad? It's good! Oh Gosh! That's sat's, a good question!So bad it's good drop bit gorgeous and they just added this hblmx by theway. What was the name of your biography bethus far, my biography life and music and storytelling. I think we could bunch it up a littlebit. ANPOT IWHAT's the funniest interview red carpet, experience thatyou've had, and I know you've been on many many red carpets both on it andbehind it. Oh Gosh, I think once I was like forced to ask Warren baby about apotential affair and he, Oh my God, hold me to fuck off and, as he should D Btma, Lord all right jermy tell everybody wherethey can. Fine! You on twitter Instagram, DJ blacklow. Myinstagram is very much just about music and Djaying, my twitters much moreabout glad and my life's work, INA Yo be taking media. Thank you. Thank you.So much for taking time out of your day...

...to talk with us, it's such a pleasure speaking with you and thank you for everything that youdo for the community. It's truly my honor Alexander. It's been so greatmeeting you through this process, I'm so fettered and honored that you tookthe time to highlight my work and the work I do it clad. So truly thepleasure in mine is mine. Thank you, wow. That has been my chat, whith,Jeremy Blacklow. You can read my indepth interview with him in our lastissue of metrosource on new stands around the nation or metrosourcecom.That's our episode! I'm your host, Alexanda Radrigez! You can find me onInstagram at Alexanders on air until next time stay. True, do you boo? That has been another Meto sorcemanylike share subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latestissue of Metroscorse magazine on newstands or online at Metscortscom?Follow us on Facebook, instagramat that ESOR and on cinere. That's a Horse MaUNTOL NEXT TIME A PA.

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