Grammy Nominated Jazz Musician Dave Koz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

During COVID, there have been amazing musicians keeping the music alive with live streams and new albums…on this episode we chat with jazz musician Dave Koz…who has singledhandedly brought SAXY BACK. 

In a recording career that spans nearly three decades, saxophonist Dave Koz has racked up an astoundingly impressive array of honors and achievements: nine GRAMMY® nominations, 11 No. 1 albums on Billboard’s Current Contemporary Jazz Albums chart, numerous world tours, 13 sold-out Dave Koz & Friends At Sea cruises, performances for multiple U.S. presidents, a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and appearances on a multitude of television shows, including “Good Morning America,” “The View,” “The Tonight Show,” “Entertainment Tonight” and more. A Platinum-selling artist, Koz is also known as a humanitarian, entrepreneur, radio host and instrumental music advocate. During COVID he released his 20th album, A New Day, exactly 30 years after his debut album came out. He has been keeping the music alive with his livestreams, including his most recent A Romantic Night In with Brian McKnight.

We chatted with him about his coming out experience, manifesting his own place in Grammy history, recording at the iconic Capitol Records…and love and dating. Check it out!  

This is Metrosourcementis the officialpodcast to metrosourts magazine and home of short form interviews with yourfavorite personalities from the lgbtq world and Beo Quick Fun and informative.It's metral source on the go out in tow since nineteen IE. Well, hello, hello, Hello! This ismetroforce MINNIS. Am Your houst Alexander Radrigas, Leep wrider formetrosource and avid podcaster that during covid there have been a numberof amazing musicians that are keeping the music alive through live streamsand new albums, and on this episode we cat with jazz musician Dave Cauz, whohas single hand in late brought saxy back, see what I did there. That's whyI'm Te leadue riter okay in a recording career that spans nearly three decadessaxophone stae cause, has wracked up an astounding, the impressive array ofhonors and achievements. Nine Grammy nominations eleven number one albums onBillboard's, current contemporary jazz albums chart numerous world tours:Thirteen sold, ow Dave, Causan friends at see cruises performance of promutiple US presidents, a star on the Hollywood, walk of fame and appearanceson the multitude of television shows, including good Mortin America. The viewof the tonight show entertainment tonight and Manymore a platinum sellingartist Davis, also known as a humanitarian entrepreneur, radio, hostand instrumental music advocate, and during covid he released his twentiethalbum a new day exactly thirty years after his debut album came out and he'sbeen keeping the music alive with his live streams, including his most recent,a romantic night in with Brian Mc night. Please welcome Mr Dave cause nobody. Imean Alex with that introduction. What am I possibly going to say now? Awell?I think Youre going to say plenty because you are very popular and wejoke about. You know you're, very popular with the MOMS and the GRANDMAS,but you know the gays love you too well and I love the gates and I love theMoms and I love the grandmothers, I'm a I'm full lof al. Yes, yes, you are, andwe saw that on a romantic night and although a romantic night in withBridon mcnight, I expected you to be in bed with prime mcnight having aromantic night, but it wasn't that kind of show. Well, I did. I did suggestthat to Brian- and you not ik me Upbuti- want to say that he got married sae,maybe five years ago, go tohis, second wife and he did a Soliloquy to herbefore he sang one of his most famous songs. I can't remember wh, it was backat one or you know you, my everything hat one ofthose ones, it's the classic primic night and he did like probably at leastfour or five minutes on how he loves his wife and how, before he's known,he's Knon so much as a ballot eear and a love song singer, but he said like he didn't even know what Love wasreally about until he met this woman and it was really just it kind ofmelted me- and I was thinking about all these women on their with theirhusbands on the sofa across the United...

States going. You know why don't youever say that to me or a single folk that we're watchingwith like a box of chocolates and postmates. That was happening too tat'sjust so you know it's like. I want o Ryan mcnight. If I didn't do the livestream, avalentize Weekan, that would have good me to Alex okay. I want to talk about early Davecause. Now we know you and the saxophone hand in hand. I mean you're,like the king, Wor Quan of the saxophone, but the saxophone was notyour first instrument. Is that correct? No, I was a piano player. First when I say piano player. I means I tookpiano lessons my mom worth me. I hated piano so much, and so I think I was Istarted when I was six or seven and to rebel. When I was around ten. I pickedup the drums and I was even worse on the drums and it was. I can remember. Idon't know, Ito told the story. I've stole a few times before, but my dadcame to pick me up from a drum lesson and he happened to be within ear shotor I was in ear shot, Withan Eer, shot by him. Talking to my teacher and theteacher said you know, I kind of I got to really break this down to you, DrCaz. It's just not going to happen with Dave on the drums IIS, not he doesn'tgot it and I was crushed and then in so I didn't know what I was going to dowith this Music Thang. I tried it twice and failed miserably and then, when Iturned thirteen- and this is what I tell young kids or older people- arlikelike you have to- If you really love music- and you want to try playing aninstrument, try a few and then you know see what what really feels right andwhat works. For me. The third time is the charm. The third time was thesaxophone. I picked it up the very first day in seventh grade and therewas a different connection to that instrument and a connection that reallyreally worked. Ind The instrument became, I would have never known backthen Alex that that instrument would become the primary relationship in mylife, but I'm very grateful for it. I wonder what those early music teachershave to say like when they see you nominatin for Grahmmmy after gram myit's like, but he can't play the drums. Well, I'm pretty sure that I would not havegotten the gramy nomination by playing drums. A'd be a whole different category. I Ishould tell you just toset the record straight. I've been nominated a lot,but I've never won so I know I's a Luki, yes, nine time. Grammy Loser is the wayI really referd to my o Eah, but you get to go to that party like nine timesand you get to go to the after party, so you know be nominated, but you knowthe funny thing is: Didn't you kind of create this category? Well, there was not. I play kind ofmusic that sort of referred to as smooth jazz, because it was a sort of aradio format in the United States for a lot of years, probably we had a goodtwenty year run. Still, there are some smooth jazz radio stations, but in thes and the early twosands it was sort of unbeatable in big cities across thecountry, and there was this kind of...

...music Thas, just where e didn't have aproper place. So none of us, none of us Mooth, jazz artists, were contemporaryjzz artists were really being recognized and it kind of hurt everyyear. Those nominations come out and you go okay. I guess I'll try next yearand so, instead of being having a bad attitude and complaining,my mom taught me this well is ai. Don't don't complain do something about it d,so I got together with my business partner at the time and we wrote aproposal to the recording academy, who does all that and it got adopted andthe next year there was a pop instrumental category released for thegrammies and amazingly that that very next year I got a nomination was myfirst nomination. So it wasn't as if we were getting snubed by the grammies itjust there wasn't a place for us. Oh and I kind of love that theme in somany different areas of life. If you know, if there's not a place for you,set your own place at the table and enjoy the the banquet so to speak, Iwant to talk about recording your debut first album at capital records. As weknow, you know capital recolds, it's just iconic and that word is thrownaround so many times, but capital records is iconic. What was thatexperience like you know, breaking off on your own being a solo artist, doingyour first album in this building that has had legends literally record. Thatmust have come with some pressure. I would imagine you have no idea the kind of pressurethat that was, I mean I just remember when I first gotsigned capital and for those of you who don't live in Los Angeles. Maybe you'veseen it on this very, very famous building it's around building in rightthere at Hollywood and vine, and I remember because I grew up in LosAngeles, so I remember driving on the Hollywood freeway and passing thattower. This was before I even made a record, but I knew that I was siginethere and I was like I said to myself, as I drove by you know, somewhere in that building is a pieceof paper with my name on it. It just was so impluded my mind so much thatthis this actually happened, and then I do remember walking down that corridorto where there's very, very famous studios, there's NE offices on top, butin the basement there are these world class studios that have recorded whether it's nacking col orthe Beatles Worh. The Beach Boys Juding Fortotean Im is SONATRA. I meanyou just every single iconic artist has been in those studios and when you walkdown the corridor Alex, there are pictures, black and white pictures ofall these people and they're staring at you. They're like this, you know. Are you going to come with it,because this was not? This is not fudny business kid, not children's businesshere this you better be ready to make some history here when you roard, andso it's daunting to say the least, but it also was very inspiring because justbeing it's almost like hallowed ground when you're in those studios realizewhat transpired in that exact same...

...airspace, it it's humbling andinspiring at the same time. Well and then looking back at thatalbum and then thirty years later, a new day, which is your latest, albumthat you've given us and it's the first time in ten years that you presentedoriginal music and so there's this excitement and there's thist kind ofcircle of life, and it's like oh amazing array of musicians on the albumnew music original music. Like I said for the first time of ten years andthen the thirtieth anniversary, it's like all this energy and then we'regoing to release it during Covid, and you guys recorded a during coit. It'slike wait what what yeah that must have been better sweet to say the least. How didyou put this album together during covid? You know there was a very funnything that happened Alex and I don't know if Yo, if you experience it inyour world, but in my world everybody was sideline so march of two thousandand twenty everybody who had any Gig was like the gigs are wiped off you'resitting at home, normally you're on the road. Doing all these wonderful things,traveling traveling to different countries and playing shows everybodyis at home and that actually worked to our advantage, believe it or not,because when I said okay even started with the writing, like I started tovirtually write songs with my cowriters, some of whom are so busy that usuallythey don't have time to write. They were not busy with during because itwas covid and then when we started to get into the recording part, becausethe technology is so the way it is now where everything is done, you can senda track to somebody and they do whatever they want on it and they sendit back to you. That's how a lot of records are made now anyway, buteverybody was home, so I could call these legends like David Samborn, oneof my all time, saxophone, idols and say David. You want to to play on thisalbum you're my meore, my sax hero, and I can't imagine this album without youand he said: Can you send it over today? He said send it today, everybody was really really excitedabout rolling up their sleeves and getting involved with music becausethey were not doing anything else so and then, when you got the tracks back,there was a level of excitement and energy to them that really separated it from other albums thatI've made, because there was that urgency of like I really want to youknow, have so much in me. That's not coming out, and I want to put it outthere into this: Whatever it was Thi Guitar Partor, a drum overdob orwhatever it was, there was so much life in these performances, and so when Ilistened back to that album, it's got all that. So I was really proud of that. An you know: Covin has been very bittersweet for artist. Like you said, I've been able to talk to celebrities that Iprobably wouldn't talk to because they're busy, like you said, and peopleare at home, but we're able to have conversations within our communitywithin other communities. We're able to connect with somebody in some smalltown in Kansas City via zoom, and we have the time and we are reflectiveright now and we're kind of I think, open to more conversations and to bemore present, and so that is, if...

...there's any benefit of covid. I woulddefinitely say that that's it, but looking back at at thirty years of work,multiple Grammy Awards, so many fun performances. Your cruises, I mean a walk, a star on the walk of fame. Imean that's not too shabby what memory really sticks out to you, the most inyour thirty years of album. Well, I will say that since you brought up theHollywood Walker Fame Star that exists right out front of the front door ofcapital records and when I found out you're not supposed to really find outuntil it's time, but I found out like a week before it was announced that I wasgoing to get one. They announced that year's Star Stars in one day, there's likeusually maybe fifteen or twenty of them, and I found out- and I knew immediatelythat I wanted it. If there's anything, I can do to get it in front of capitalrecords, I mean that's where Sonatra isn't, the Beatles are and body rateand Garth Brooks, I mean and Natali Col, and that king call I mean they're allright, theres like if you're going to have a star and Ala walk a fan. That'swhere you want tit. So I called up my friends a capital and I went down thereand I found the star that was empty and I stood on it and I claimed it Wasa La of course. This is not how it worksright. Believe me, this is it's all about the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce,but they got wind of this from the person of capital records that I wentdown there early and I found my star and they gave it to me so go figurethat was in two thousand and nine. I just that day alone and I've had some prettyamazing days whether it was playing for Obama. I was Obama's opening act. Onetime I played for Clinton as well, but I think, playing and being a part of the Hollywood walkof fame ceremony with my whole family and all my friends and and fans thereas well. It's just it was such a weird surreal thing, and so often now I'll go drive down there, just to makesure that it's still there and I dream that it feels like somebodymade a terrible mistake, giving me that thing, but so far it's still there andevery time that they do go Alex, I usually take some windex Iwas gonna sayI would be polishing that every single day, if it was mine, I would tellpeople hey, don't step on me and the GRAMIS. We were joking aboutthe grammies. Grammys are one thing and that's a award from your peers, but thefact that this thing exists in the sidewalk in Hollywood and will be there,hopefully for a very, very long time, that's kind of like the best. If therewas one awar that, I would say means the most. It's that one, because it'sit's about your whole career, it's not about one particular album or oneparticular performance. It really represents and that's what actually,the stipulations are not about what...

...you've done or what you've achieved isreally about what you do for the community you're giving back and yourphilanthropy and how you show up in the world and Los Angeles is I mentioned. Iwas born and raised in the valley here I love my town. I love my city and I'mvery dedicated to to keeping it. You know the the cultural hub that it hasbeen for all these years and hopefully will be for many years in the future.Well, it does re, it does reflect your full career and you've definitely madea name not only for yourself but but for jazz. And let's talk about your coming out,you came out in two thousand and four. You know today's age. We think oh twothousand an four wasn't that far away and right now we're enjoying this hugeinflux of entertainment, personalities coming out, but two thousand and four was still notthis hugely open era. Why come out? Well, I actually didn't I didn't planon doing it. It was a very strange thing how it happened. I had a justI'll tell you the brief story was. I was promoting an album calledSAXOPHONIC and I had a friend who worked for another gay magazine andsaid I'd like to interview you for about the new album. I said well yeah.As long as we don't have to go to the to the gay stuff, I'm happy to talk youno game magazine in Agam aazineyehe editors are cool, we'll just do itabout the thing and he wrote a beautiful article gave it to theeditors and the editors. You know it's not like. I ever hid that I was gay. Iwas sort ofo out of friends and family, just not out professionally, and sothey knew that I was Gayng and they said to my friend he said we know he'sgay. This is a new policy. Some that made the policy right. Then we have. Ifknow someone is gay. We have to ask them about that. That's our new policy,so he comes back hat and hands and I'm so sorry. I have to do this and Inoticed the way that I felt in that moment, which was maybe this is okay. Maybe this is time,and so I talked to my managers. My managers at the time were representingMelissa Ethridge, so they had a tremendous amount of experience in thisexact department and I came to them and they said you have our full support,but if you're going to do it, do it with the advocate magazine, that's sortof like the the Time magazine of the Gay Community at the time I don't knowif it still is, but and it's up there you know. So, are we yeah? Well? If I knew about metrosource back,then I would have done it with you guys, but I did do it and it came out. It was a very lovely article and within twoweeks of that article coming out, I was in people magazines, fifty eligiblebachelors or whatever that is. I was playing for Senator Ted Kennedy, the Light SenatorKennedy for he Democratic Senator Party in hisbackyard. I mean it was just like the...

...this thing. It was such a beautiful once again the experience of when youshow up as your authentic cell as hard as that can be. Believe me. I know thatit's hard, for you know, that's that's a part of thehuman condition. It's not easy to show up as who you are, but when you dotherare, just tremendous rewards that come with that- and this was a perfectexample of that, and it was not possible until I hit that point whereit was like. Okay, this might be the time week before. No it's so I alwaysem very sensitive and to people's own coming out stories. Youcan't do it until you're just ready to do it and then, when you're ready,let's go yeah well and being authentic. To yourself I mean you know: We'vetalked about how you've kind of made a place for yourself. Even your star,you're like this, is where my staris going to be and like this is a categorythat we're going to have for musicians like me and you've done it, and it'sreally paived for the way for people to come after you but whan. I think ofJazz, I think of it as a very straight dominated genree and I've seen youshare the stage as the only white guy on stage I've seen you as the onlyopenly gay guy on stage an like. You hold your own you're, telling yourstory. Have you experienced any pushback from peers in your industryregarding your sexuality? There may have been some kind of behind my back, but I reallydon't know of any, and I think it's really about the quality of humanbeings that you work with. I will say something about the jazz community. Itis very straight, you know, dominated by straight men and women, but I think jazz musicians in generalare pretty cool people, and I think if youshow up- and you got the goods, then you then you have no problem. FredVersh is openly gay straight ahead, jazz playerout of New York. There are a number of gay jazzmusicians that are very successful and beloved, and so I think it really isagain. You know that stuff shouldn't be part of the equation in he, the worldof music. If you have something to say and pretty cool way of saying it thenyou're going to get support, and I got nothing but beautiful support from myfriends for musical friends and it just doesn't even come up. I mean II'll jokeabout it occasionally, but it's just not even and that's the way it shouldbe your sto PR reference. Your sexual orientation is not Youre, not somethingthat needs to be led with it's it's sort ofinconsequential to in the world of music. It's all about the music. I love that so much you know we havebeen through an administration where we kind of did have to put our sexualityup front, just to defend ourselves and people in our community, but I reallydo think the more we present ourselves as I'm this full person. I'm all ofthese things, the the more we can build bridges and the faster. We can buildbridges from people that might not...

...understand the Lgbtq community, becausewe are so many things. You know we're brothers were neighbors where your coworkers were, you know we are all these other things were musicians. This is mypassion and you know what you do in the bedroom. You know it's kind of you knowup to you now, but talking about Valentines and talking about coming out- and you know you have to know likepeople's comments and all that whenever you take the stage it's like. Ohthere's, dame coze's such a hot, Daddy, H, that's happening like tits, justHappeni, it's like those pants, my goodness so you come out, but to the socialmedia, world, you've kind of led, thes single life. Is that True Day've cause. I have I'm a single man. I haven'treally I'm not. I wouldn't call myself a real relationship person or it hasn'tbeen that way in the past. Certainly keep that open, but yeah I mean I don't feel like anyshortage of love. I really had a wonderful feel very grateful for thelife that I've been able to have. I've had a lot of love in it. I'm I love todate and thank God that there are people who you know like people like me. Is it hard to date, they've cause it'shard to date, covid yeah, it's hard to date, ind covid, because you're justworried. You know there's a lot of really interesting parallels betweenCOVID and HIV. I grew up with the the threat of HIV. Always I graduated highschool in one thousand nine hundred and eighty one. So I was all of a suddenlike becoming a a man and wanting to experience everything and then okay.These are my desires. I want to do this. Oh wait a minute. If I do that an back,then this is a long time ago. Back then, if you had sex with someone you coulddie, I mean it was really playing just that so, and I don't mean to bring itdown like that, but having felt that for somany years to get to a point where now having hf is not a death senten on,thankfully I never got HIV and I take the. What do you call it prep every day andI kiss that pill every day, because I think to myself wow like when onethousand nine hundred and eighty one or eighty three or whatever was the factthat one day there was this pill that if you're negative, you can take everyday and you can keep negative for the rest of your life. I mean it just it issound. It astounds me and Covid is really interesting now, becauseeverybody- I not just gay people that are waking up and saying you know, Iwant to make sure that I protect myself and I don't die from this and, ifyou're out there trying to meet people now, that's a that's a real,interesting intersection to cross and...

...not easy, and you just have to plan itout well and talk and communication. I think communication in all personalrelationships is so important and something that oftentimes we take forgranted. But now more than ever, we need to do make sure that we're reallycommunicating with our partners- and I think, cofin has kind of reinspired.The idea of communication such as I sort of texting you I'll jump on zoom,and you know, let's have happy our you know. Let's, let's communicate that wayand thing about covid. It's really put the nation on on equal plane field.It's not determined about how much money you have it's not based on yoursexuality. It's not based on your ethinicity, it's affecting us all as anation, and so it has brought us together for the most part. We knowthat you know. There's always there's always the other side, but Ithink communication, especially with the younger generation, has kind ofbeen reinspired and again, if that's a positive, I think it's great. I mean Ijust did a video with these young filmmakers for a song of my album andthey get out there. But I noticed that this is young, Filmmakan Inben and ahe's straight kit and at the bottom of his email. Is You know him his that that thing thepronounce that he chooses and that's kind of an interesting thing for astraight man to have that at the bottom of his email of every email that goesout? This is how I view myself and how I'd like to be referred to and to meevery time I see that and I'm starting to see that more often it's like. I gotno worries about the future because young people- just this, is not what has tripped us up and I'm notputting you in my inormal hell of a lot old than you, but it's all filter. It's all filter over, but tripped us up of a certainage just does not even ping a younger person in their tweties. You know- andI think that that really bodes well for our community and the world in general-that we can be a lot kinder and, of course, look we're coming after fouryears of trump. I probably don't need to say here how Ifelt about the last four years, really just assaulted and and disgusted andfatigued beyond measure of just waking up every day. For four years wonderingwhat that person was going to do- and I feel so much better now- because respect and dignity and kindness andgenerosity of spirit, they're back on the menu and and it's just a- I thinkthat it bodes well for all of us. I totally agree Dave your album kind of touches onisolation. You know during covid and and your music video with Rit Brianmcnight again was celebrating New York in a very uniqueway, an that we saw New York totally...

...stripped down. What is your mis messageto the LGBT COQ community? Who may be feeling isolated right now during covid?What do you have to say? Well, you said it really great, and I think thatbecause of the available technology, that's here and of course, likeeverything, there's two sides to the point: it's social media can be very verydenigrating to and very it can be crushing to the to the soul. I've been there posting something, andsomeone comes back and writes you something that just like wrex your week,but by the same token, the there's so many technologies. Now I just learned anew social media thing: That's brand new called club house which is sort oflike live podcasting for lack of better term, and I think that the technologyis atually holping us, especially during this time where we are not ableto be in person as much as we'd like to to to keep that kind activity. Wenoticed it in the livestreams to Alex. we did one for Valentine's, as youmentioned, and there was probably ten thousand people watching that and whichis mind boggling to me, because I have abit of an older audience and yet they really figured out the tech if they getout of way to get it on their computer or get it on their big screen and theyat there at home and enjoyed a concert and in many ways. I think that this isthis aspect will continue, even though we know that there's going to be a timewhen our tours will resume and we'll be able to travel and people be able to goto venues and enjoy that experience, nothing will ever take that experienceaway, but thereis. This too, like you and I right now, we can't be together, although I wouldlike to have a crocktail with you it so I think, we'd be dangerous. I think wewould really really like we would like drunk dial, Nance sonatro or somethinglike this. Do It whattcot you like Vadka and anything,but it's only Vadca any other alcohol and I'll end up in jail. WAS THAT GIN? Jim? No, No F! If I have anything else, I'llend up in jail, oay, no Tikila, Nojin Juoci is I make a very very mean Voka,Martini Faryor on you are on I'm all for it. Yes, I recognize those motions fromyour stage: Whele you're, shaking that saxophone all right Dave. Are you ready to play alittle rapid fire, of course? Okay? Where is Ityoer O okay? If you were towrite a song for Sax and Lady Gaga, what would the song be called? It would be called in in the sacks ofglory. Oh yes, love it done. What is a dating Red Flag? That is an absoad flag.That is an absolute no go for you...

...last minute: cancellations, Yeah Yep! I hear you guilty pleasure song onyour playlist. Ten you've got that gun. He Got HummyYoyn GON BE Y Yo. You went right to that. I love Beber. I love by the way thatthat album, not the new albums to, but that the album changes it's got to beone of the greatest pop albums of all time. I love that album every singlesong and he's such a May. We think about H, t that kid andwhat he's been his life so far and lik he's done. I have a lot of respect forwhat he's been able to he's held it together. I mean you know not the best,but given the circumstances, I think he's done pretty well and he's verytalented, very at the neaze. Jo Excuse, myce. Thank you. What would the name ofa musical based on your life be the Jewish sacx player on the roof? All right doesn't have a mine, yeah, okay, theworst funniest onstage mishap, oh well, I I dropped myself. I was in front oftenthousand people or maybe even more opening up for Berry Mannelo in Chicago,and so I had a this was a few years ago andBarry's, a good friend of mine, H, asked me to open up for him on a tourof the United States. So you know, of course I jumped at the opportunity, buthere I am in front of t ten or fifty thousand screaming Verry Mentalal fansnot happy to see me at all so, and I was just for twenty fiveminutes, and so I'm trying my best to make it happen saying his name Berry'scoming out he'll be on just a second, but you know he's not going to come outany sooner, so we might as well have a good time, and I get so into it.There's one time when I did one of these moves with the saxophone my strapbecause you hold the Saxopon sexone, weighs like fifteen twenty pounds. It'sa heavy thing to be around your neck all the time- and I did one of thesemoves like this, because I was so exuberant. You know trying to coral.The energy of this people, the Sax, fell off the the strap and flew twentyfeet across the state. There was a hush over the crowd going,you know and they tought and I went to go, get the saxophone. I was so scared,because this is my baby. You know one thousand nine hundred and sixty threesummer mark six baby and of course I looked at it an I knew that it wouldn'tplay so I switched to the other saxophone, the Alta that I had therefinish. The song finish the set, and then a few of my friends came back that werein Chicago. For that show. They said...

...that sack Stut is brilliant igh, I said no saxophone is going to go intoemergency surgery. It's like that point in the rock star,where they just smash their guitars yeah can't really do that with Saxopose for Dave. Please tell everybody where youwant them to find you and follow you on facebook Dave Cos music at Dave,cosmusic and it's Koz, and you can find meon twitter there on Instagram, it'smy full legal name. So it's David Stephen, with a Ph stefenCAS and Dave Cazcom is my website where you can, if you lose track of any ofthat, you can find it it all there at Dave, coscom and Itsal. So much foryour you guys are so great. I love talking with you, I'm going to hold youto that cocktail soon. Oh, you better, believe it, because it's going to be anight to remember, like they're Goinna, have to write like an HBO series basedon that night, thenight of Davit's, always a pleasure speakingwith you. Thank you. Thank you. So much enjoy the rest of COVID and I hope tosee you in Person Real Som, always pleasure, but thank you so so much Ye.So thank you. That has been my chat with Dave cauze. You can read myindepth interview with him in our current issue of metrosours on newstands across the nation or at Metrosourcecom, and that's our episode.I am your host and lead Rihter for metrosaurcs magazine, Alexanda Rodrigez.You can follow me on Instagram at Alexenders on air until next time staytrue and do you boo. That has been another metrosource. Manylike share subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latestissue, O Letrocorse magazine on New Stans or online at mesicortcom. Followus on Facebook, instagram, an natrasource and on Tinere nete course,man until next time, a a.

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