Grammy Nominated Jazz Musician Dave Koz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

During COVID, there have been amazing musicians keeping the music alive with live streams and new albums…on this episode we chat with jazz musician Dave Koz…who has singledhandedly brought SAXY BACK. 

In a recording career that spans nearly three decades, saxophonist Dave Koz has racked up an astoundingly impressive array of honors and achievements: nine GRAMMY® nominations, 11 No. 1 albums on Billboard’s Current Contemporary Jazz Albums chart, numerous world tours, 13 sold-out Dave Koz & Friends At Sea cruises, performances for multiple U.S. presidents, a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and appearances on a multitude of television shows, including “Good Morning America,” “The View,” “The Tonight Show,” “Entertainment Tonight” and more. A Platinum-selling artist, Koz is also known as a humanitarian, entrepreneur, radio host and instrumental music advocate. During COVID he released his 20th album, A New Day, exactly 30 years after his debut album came out. He has been keeping the music alive with his livestreams, including his most recent A Romantic Night In with Brian McKnight.

We chatted with him about his coming out experience, manifesting his own place in Grammy history, recording at the iconic Capitol Records…and love and dating. Check it out!  

This is metro source minis, theofficial podcast to Metro source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favoritepersonalities from the lgbtq world and beyond. Quick, Fun and informative. It'snatal source on the go, out in proud since one thousand nine hundred andninety. Well, hello, hello, hello. This is metro source minisand your host, Alexander Rodriguez, bleep writer for Metro source and avid podcasterthat during covid there have been a number of amazing musicians that are keeping themusic alive through live streams and new albums, and on this episode we chat withjazz musician Dave cause, who has single handedly brought saxyback. See whatI did? That's why I'm the lead writer. Okay, in a recordingcareer that spans nearly three decades saxophonies, Dave Cause has wracked up an astoundingthe impressive array of honors and achievements. Nine Grammy Nominations, eleven number onealbums on billboards, current contemporary jazz albums chart, numerous world tours, thirteensold out Dave Cause and friends at sea cruises, performance of for multiple USpresidents, a star on the Hollywood walk of fame and appearances on the multitudeof television shows, including Good Morning America, the view, the tonight show,entertainment tonight and many more. A platinum selling artist, Davis also knownas a humanitarian entrepreneur, radio host and instrumental music advocate, and during covidhe these to twenty album a new day, exactly thirty years after his debut albumcame out, and he's been keeping their music alive with his live streams, including his most recent all romantic night in with Brian McKnight. Please welcomeMr Dave, cause nobody, I mean Alex, with that introduction. Whatam I possibly going to say now? Well, there you're going to sayplenty, because you are very popular and we joke about you. Know,you're very popular with the moms and the GRANDMAS, but you know, thegays love you too well, and I love the gays and I love theMOM's and I love the grandmother's. I'M A, I'm full love, Alex. Yes, yes, you are, and we saw that on a romanticnight in. Although a romantic night in with Brian McKnight, I expected youto be in bed with Brian McKnight having a romantic night, but it wasn'tthat kind of shot. Well, I did. I did suggest that toBrian and he take me up, but I want to say that he gotmarried. See me five years ago. I go to his second wife andhe did a Soliloquy to her before he sang one of his most famous songs. I can't remember when I was back at one or you know, you'remy everything. One are those ones that's the classic Brian McKnight. He didlike probably at least four or five minutes on how he loves his wife andhow before he's known, he's known so much as a ballad or in alove song singer, but he said like he didn't even know what Love wasreally about until he met this woman, and it was really just it kindof melted me and I was thinking about all these women on there with theirhusband's on the sofa across the United States...

...going, you know, why don'tyou ever say that to me or a single folk that were watching with likea box of chocolates and postmats that was happening to just so you know,it's like I want to write at night. If I didn't do the live stream, about as we could that would have been me too, Alex.okay, I want to talk about early Dave, cause now we know youand the saxophone hand in hand. I mean you're like the king or queenof the saxophone. But the saxophone was not your first instrument. Is thatcorrect? No, I was piano player first. When I say piano player, I means I took piano lessons my mom for me, I hated pianoso much, and so I think I was. I started when I wassix or seven and to rebel, when I was around ten, I pickedup the drums and I was even worse on the drums, and it wasI can remember. I don't know, but told the story of still afew times before. But My dad came to pick me up from a drumlesson and he happened to be within earshot, or I was in ear shot withan ear shot, of him, talking to my teacher, and theteacher said, you know, I gotta gotta really break this down to you, Dr Caz. It's just not going to happen with Dave on the drums, is not. He doesn't got it. And I was crushed and then inso I didn't know what I was going to do with the music thing. I tried it twice and failed miserably. And then when I turned thirteen,and this is what I tell young kids are older people alike like,you have to if you really love music and you want to try playing aninstrument, try a few and then you know, see what what really feelsright and what works for me. The third time was the charm. Thethird time was the saxophone. I picked it up the very first day inseventh grade and there was a different connection to that instrument and a connection thatreally really worked, and the instrument became I would have never known back then, Alex, that that instrument would become the primary relationship in my life,but I'm very grateful for it. I wonder with those early music teachers haveto say, like when they see you nominated for Grammy, after grab me, it's like, but I can't play the drums. Well, I'm prettysure that I would not have gotten the grammy nomination by playing drums. I'dbe a whole different category question. I should tell you, just to setthe record straight, I've been nominated a lot but I've never won. SoI know. Here's a lutee yes, nine time grammy losers, the wayI really refer to my school. Yeah, but you get to go to thatparty like nine times and you get to go to the after party.So you know, be nominated. But you know, the funny thing is, didn't you kind of create this category? Well, there was not. Iplay a kind of music that sort of referred to as smooth jazz becauseit was a sort of a radio format in the United States for a lotof years. Probably we had a good twenty year run and still there aresome smooth jazz radio stations. But in the s and the early S itwas sort of unbeatable in big cities across the country and there was this kindof music is just where he didn't have...

...a proper place. So none ofus, none of us smooth jazz artists, for contemporary jazz artists, were reallybeing recognized and it kind of hurt every year those nominations come out andyou go, okay, I guess I'll try next year. And so insteadof being having a bad attitude and complaining, my mom taught me this well asdon't don't complain, do something about it, and so I got togetherwith my business partner at the time and we wrote a proposal to the recordingacademy, who does all that, and it got adopted and the next yearthere was a pop instrument category released for the grammys and amazingly that that verynext year I got a nomination, was my first nomination. So it wasn'tas if we were getting snubbed by the grammy's, it just there wasn't aplace for us. Oh and I kind of love that theme in so manydifferent areas of life. If you know, if there's not a place for you, set your own place at the table and enjoy the the banquets,so to speak. I want to talk about recording your debut, first album, at capital records, as we know. You know capital records. It's justiconic and that word is thrown around so many times, but capital recordsis iconic. What was that experience like? You know, breaking off on yourown, being a solo artist, doing your first album in this buildingthat has had legends literally record. That must have come with some pressure.I would imagine. You have no idea the kind of pressure that that was. I mean I just remember when I first got signed to capital and forthose of you who don't live in Los Angeles. Maybe you've seen it onthis very, very famous building. It's around building in right there at Hollywoodand vine and I remember because I grew up in Los Angeles. So Iremember driving on the Hollywood freeway and passing that tower. This was before Ieven made a record, but I knew that I was signed there and Iwas like, I said to myself as I drove by, you know,somewhere in that building is a piece of paper with my name on it.It just was so it blew my mind so much that this this actually happened. And then I do remember walking down that corridor to where there's very,very famous studios. There's the offices on top, but in the basement thereare these world class studios that have recorded, whether it's nacking Cole or the Beatlesor the beach boys jooting throbot, it's Sinatra. I mean you justevery single iconic artist has been in those studios. And when you walk downthe corridor Alex, there are pictures, black and white pictures of all thesepeople and they're staring at you. They're like this, you know, areyou going to come with it? Because this is not this is not funnybusiness. Gives is not children's business here this you better be ready to makesome history here when you roar. And so it's daunting to say the least. But it also was very inspiring because just being it's almost like hallowed groundwhen you're in those studios realize what transpired in that exact same airspace. Itit's humbling and inspiring at the same time.

Well, and then looking back atthat album and then thirty years later, a new day, which is yourlatest album that you've given us, and it's the first time in tenyears that you presented original music, and so there's this excitement and there's justkind of circle of life and it's like Oh, amazing array of musicians onthe album, new music, original music, the thirty of anniversary, it's likeall this energy and then we're going to release it during covid and you guysrecorded it during covid. It's like, wait, what, what? Yeah, that must have been better, sweet to say the least. How didyou put this album together during covid? You know, there was a veryfunny thing that happened Alex, and I don't know if you experience it inyour world, but in my world everybody was sidelined. So March of twothousand and twenty, everybody who had any GIG was like the gigs are wipedoff. You're sitting at home. Normally you're on the road doing all thesewonderful things, traveling, traveling to different countries and playing shows. Everybody isat home. And that actually worked to our advantage, believe it or not, because when I said okay, even started with the writing, like Istarted to virtually write songs with my co writers, some of whom are sobusy that usually they don't have time to write. They were not busy duringbecause it was covid and then when we started to get into the recording part, because the technology is so the way it is now, where everything isdone, you can send a track to somebody and they do whatever they wanton it and they send it back to you. That's how a lot ofrecords are made now anyway. But everybody was home, so I could callthese legends like David Sanborn, one of my all time saxophone idols, andsay, David, you want to to play on this album? You're mymirror, my sax hero, and I can't imagine this album without you.And he said can you send it over today? He said, send ittoday. Everybody was really, really excited about rolling up their sleeves and gettinginvolved with music because they were not doing anything else. So and then whenyou got the tracks back, there was a level of excitement and energy tothem that really separated it from other albums that I've made, because there wasthat urgency of like I really want to you know, have so much inme that's not coming out and I want to put it out there into thiswhatever it was guitar part or a drum overdub or whatever it was, therewas so much life in these performances and so when I listen back to thatalbum, it's got all that. So I was really proud of that.And you know, covid has been very bittersweet for artist. Like you said, I've been able to talk to celebrities that I probably wouldn't talk to becausethey're busy, like you said, and people are at home. But we'reable to have conversations within our community, within other communities. We're able toconnect with somebody in some small town in Kansas City via zoom and we havethe time and we are reflective right now and we're kind of, I think, open to more conversations and to be...

...more present, and so that isif there's any benefit of Covid I would definitely say that that's it. Butlooking back at at thirty years of work, multiple Grammy Awards, so many funperformances, your cruises, I mean a walk or a star on thewalk of fame, I mean that's not too shabby. What memory really sticksout to you the most in your thirty years of album? Well, Iwill say that, since you brought up the Hollywood walk of Fame Star,that exists right out front of the front door of capital records. And whenI found out, you're not supposed to really find out until it's time,but I found that like a week before it was announced that I was goingto get one, they announced that year's Star Stars in one day. There'slike usually maybe fifteen or twenty of them, and I found out and I knewimmediately that I wanted it. If if there's anything I could do toget it in front of capital records, I mean that's where Sinatra is inthe Beatles are and Bondy rate and Garth Brooks, I mean, and NatalieCole and that King Call. I mean, they're all right. There's like,if you're going to have a star on all a walk of fame,that's where you want to so I called up my friends a capital and Iwent down there and I found the star that was empty and I stood onit and I claimed it is mine. Of course, this is not howit works right, believe me, this is it's all about the Hollywood Chamberof Commerce. But they got wind of this from the person at capital recordsthat I went down there early. I've found my star and they gave itto me, so go figure. That was in two thousand and nine.I just that day alone, and I've had some pretty amazing days, whetherit was playing for Obama, I was Obama's opening act. One time Iplayed for Clinton as well, but I think playing and being a part ofthe Hollywood walk of fame ceremony with my whole family and all my friends andand fans there as well. It's just it was such a weird, surrealthing and so often now I'll go drive down there just to make sure thatit's still there and I dream that it feels like somebody made a terrible mistakegiving me that thing, but so far it's still there and every time thatthe dog Alex, I usually take some windex. I've got to say Iwould be polishing that every single day. If it was mine. I wouldtell people, Hey, don't step on me. And the grammys. Wewere joke about the grammys. Grammy's are one thing and that's a award fromyour peers, but the fact that this thing exists in the sidewalk in Hollywoodand will be there, hopefully for a very, very long time, that'skind of like the best. If there was one award that I would saymeans the most, it's that one because it's it's about your whole career.It's not about one particular album or one particular performance. It really represents andthat's what actually the the stipulations are not...

...about what you've done or what you'veachieved. It's really about what you do for the community, you're giving backand your philanthropy and how you show up in the world and Los Angeles,as I mentioned, I was born and raised in the valley here. ILove My town, I love my city and I'm very dedicated to to keepingit you know the the cultural hub that it has been for all these yearsand hopefully will be for many years in the future. Well, and TesReef, it does reflect your full career and you've definitely made a name notonly for yourself but but for jazz. And let's talk about you're coming out. You came out in two thousand and four. You know, today's agewe think, Oh, two thousand and four wasn't that far away, andright now we're enjoying this huge influx of entertainment personalities coming out, but twothousand and four was still not this hugely open era. Why come out?Well, I actually didn't. I didn't plan on doing it. It wasa very strange thing how it happened. I had to just I'll tell youthe brief story was I was promoting an album called saxophonic and I had afriend who worked for another gay magazine and said I'd like to interview for aboutthe new album. I said, well, yeah, as long as we don'thave to go to the to the gay stuff, I'm happy to talkin a gay magazine, in a game magazine. No, no, thethe editors are cool. We'll just do it about the thing. And hewrote a beautiful article, gave it to the editors and the editors, youknow, it's not like I ever hid that I was gay. I wassort of out of friends and family, just not out professionally, and sothey knew that I was gay and they said to my friend, he said, we know he's gay. This is a new policy. It's not thatmade the policy right then we have if we know someone is gay, wehave to ask them about that. That's our new policy. So he comesback hat and hand said, I'm so sorry, but I have to dothis, and I noticed the way that I've felt in that moment, whichwas maybe this is okay, maybe this is time, and so I talkedto my managers. My managers at the time were representing Melissa Ethridge, sothey had a tremendous amount of experience in this exact department, and I cameto them and they said you have our full support, but if you're goingto do it, do it with the advocate magazine. That's sort of likethe Time magazine of the Gay Community at the time. I don't know ifit still is, but and I it's up there, you know. Soare we? Yeah, well, if I knew about Metro source. Backthen, I would have done it with you guys, but I did doit and it came out. It was a very lovely article and within twoweeks of that article coming out I was in people magazines. Fifty eligible bachelorsor whatever that is. I was playing for Senator Ted Kennedy, the lateSenator Kennedy, for Democratic Senator Party in...

...his backyard. I mean, itwas just like the this thing. It was such a beautiful once again,the experience of when you show up as the your authentic self, as hardas that can be. Believe me, I know that it's hard for youknow that's that's a part of the human condition. It's not easy to showup as who you are, but when you do, they're just tremendous rewardsthat come with that and this was a perfect example of that. And itwas not possible until I hit that point where it was like, okay,this might be the time. A week before. No, it's so asI always am very sensitive and to people's own coming out stores. You can'tdo it until you just ready to do it and then when you're ready,let's go. Yeah, well, and being authentic to yourself. I meanyou know, we've talked about how you've kind of made a place for yourself, even your star you're like this is where my start's going to be andlike this is a category that we're going to have for musicians like me,and you've done it and it's really paid for the way for people to comeafter you. But when I think of Jazz, I think of it asa very straight dominated genre and I've seen you share the stage as the onlywhite guy on stage. I've seen you as the only openly gay guy onstage and like you hold your own, you're telling your story. Have youexperienced any pushback from peers in your industry regarding your sexuality? There may havebeen some kind of behind my back, but I really don't know of any, and I think it's really about the quality of human beings that you workwith. I will say something about the jazz community. Is Very straight,you know, dominated by straight men and women, but I think jazz musiciansin general are pretty cool people and I think if you show up and you'vegot the goods, then you then you have no problem. Fred Hirsh's openlygay, straight ahead jazz player out of New York. There are a numberof gay jazz musicians that are very successful and beloved, and so I thinkit really is again, you know, that stuff shouldn't be part of theequation in the the world of music. If you have something to say anda pretty cool way of saying it, then you're going to get support.And I got nothing but beautiful support from my friends, from musical friends,and it just doesn't even come up. I mean I have, I'll jokeabout it occasionally, but it's just not even and that's the way it shouldbe. Your social preference, your sexual orientation, is not you're not somethingthat needs to be led with. It's sort of inconsequential to in the worldof music. It's all about the music. I love that so much. Youknow, we we have been through an administration where we kind of didhave to put our sexuality up front just to defend ourselves and people in ourcommunity. But I really do think the more we present ourselves as I'm thisfull person, I'm all of these things, the the more we can build bridgesin the faster we can build bridges...

...from people that might not understand theLgbtq community, because we are so many things. You know, we're brothers, where neighbors, where your coworkers, where, you know, we areall these other things where musicians, this is my passion, and you knowwhat you do in the bedroom. You know it's kind of, you know, up to you now. But talking about Valentines and talking about coming outand you know you have to know like people's comments and all that. Wheneveryou take the stage it's like, oh, there's Damn Couzi, such a hotdaddy. Know that that's happening like that. It's just happy. It'slike, Oh, one of those pants, my goodness. So you come out, but to the social media world you've kind of led the single life. Is that true? They have caused I have I'm a single man.I haven't really I'm not I wouldn't call myself a real relationship person, orit hasn't been that way and in the past a certainly keep that open.But yeah, I mean I don't feel like any shortage of love. I'vereally had a wonderful feel very grateful for the life that I've been able tohave. I've had a lot of love in it. I'm I love todate and thank God that there are people who, you know, like peoplelike me is it hard to date dayve cause it's hard to date, andCovid? Yeah, it's hard to date, and covid because you're just worried.You know, there's a lot of really interesting parallels between COVID and HIV. I grew up with the the threat of HIV always. I graduated CatHigh School in one thousand nine hundred and eighty one, so I was allof a sudden like becoming a a man and wanting to experience everything and then, okay, these are my desires, I want to do this. Oh, wait a minute, if I do that back then, this is along time ago. Back then, if you had sex with someone, youcould die. I mean it was really plain just that. So, andI don't mean to bring it down like that, but having felt that forso many years, to get to a point where now having HIV is nota death sentence, and thankfully I never got HIV and I take the whatyou call it prep every day and I kiss that pill every day because Ithink to myself, wow, like when, in one thousand nine hundred and eightyone, or eighty three or whatever, was the fact that one day therewas this pill that if your negative, you can take every day and youcan keep negative for the rest of your life. I mean, itjust astound, astounds me. And covid is really interesting now because everybody,it's not just gay people, that are waking up and saying, you know, I want to make sure that I protect myself and I don't die fromthis. And if you're out there trying to meet people, now that's athat's a real interesting intersection to cross and...

...not easy and you just have toplan it out well and talk. And Communication. I think communication in allpersonal relationships is so important and something that oftentimes we take for granted, butnow more than ever, we need to do make sure that we're really communicatingwith our partners, and I think covid has kind of reinspire the idea ofcommunication, such as, instead of texting you, I'll jump on zoom and, you know, let's have happy hour, you know, let's let's communicate thatway. And think about covid. It's really put the nation on onequal playing field. It's not determined about how much money you have, it'snot based on your sexuality, it's not based on your ethnicity. It's affectingus all as a nation, and so it has brought us together for themost part. We know that. You know, there's always there's always theother side, but I think commune dication, especially with the younger generation, haskind of been reinspired and again, if that's a positive, I thinkit's great. I mean, I just did a video with these young filmmakersfor a song on my album and they get out there. But I noticedthat this is a young filmmaker named been and at he's straight kit and atthe bottom of his email is you know him. Is that that thing,the pronounced, that he chooses? And that's kind of an interesting thing fora straight man to have that at the bottom of his email on every emailthat goes out. This is how I view myself and how I'd like tobe referred to and to me. Every time I see that, nice I'mstarting to see that more often. It's like I got no worries about thefuture, because young people just this is not what has tripped us up,and I'm not putting you in my I know him. A hellable out allin you, but it's all filter. It's all filter and it over.But what it tripped us up of a certain age just does not even pinga younger person in their twenties, you know, and I think that thatreally bodes well for our community and the world in general that we can bea lot kinder. And, of course, look, we're coming after four yearsof trump. I probably don't need to say here how I felt aboutthe last four years. Really just assaulted and and disgusted and fatigued beyond measureof just waking up every day for four years wondering what that person was goingto do. And I feel so much better now because respect and dignity andkindness and generosity of spirit they're back on the menu and and it's just aI think that it bodes well for all of us. I totally agree.Dave. Your album kind of touches on isolation. You know, during covidand and your music video with Brian McKnight again was celebrating New York in avery unique way and that we saw New...

York totally stripped down. What isyour misset message to the LGBT CO que community who maybe feeling isolated right now? During covid what you used to say? Well, you said it really greatand I think that because of the the available technology that's here and ofcourse, like everything, there's two sides to the coin. It's social mediacan be very, very denigrating to and very it can be crushing to theto the soul. I've been there posting something and someone comes back and writesis something that just like bres your week. But by the same token, thethere's so many technolog ologies now. I just learned a new social mediathing that's brand new called clubhouse, which is sort of like live podcasting,for lack of a better term, and I think that the the technology isreally putting us, especially during this time where we are not able to bein person as much as we'd like to to to keep that kind of activity. We noticed it in the lime streams to Alex we did one for Valentine's, as you mentioned, and there was probably tenzero people watching that, andwhich is mindboggling to me because I have a bit of an older audience.And yet they really figured out the tech, figured out a way to get iton their computer or get it on their big screen and they at thereat home and enjoyed a concert. And in many ways I think that thisis this aspect will continue, even though we know that there's going to bea time when our tours will resume and we'll be able to travel and peoplebe able to go to venues and enjoy that experience. Nothing will ever takethat experience away. But there's this too. Like you and I, right nowwe can't be together, although I would like to have a cocktail withyou. It so I think we'd be dangerous. I think we would really, really like we would like drunk dial Nancy Sinatra or something like this.Do it. What's what's? What cocktail? You like vodka and anything, butit's only vodka. Any other alcohol and I'll end up in GIMP.Is that Jin Jim? No, no, if I have anything else, I'llend up in jail. Okay, so, Noe Tequila. No,Jin, just like the vodka. It is. I make a very,very mean vodka Martini. There, you're on, you are on. I'moff for it. Yes, I recognize those motions from your stage while you'reshaking that saxophone. All right, Dave, are you ready play a little rapidfire? Of course, okay, worries were okay, if you wereto write a song for Sax and Lady Gaga, what would the song becalled? It would be called in in the sacks of glory. Oh yes, love it done. What is a daating red flag? That is anabsolute no go for you. Last minute...

...cancelations? Yeah, Yep, Ihear you. Guilty pleasure song on your playlist. Then you've got that dumme Yuh Um yeuh yeah, the Yeung. You went right to that. Ilove Bieber. I love, by the way, that bad album,not the new albums to but the that shite, the album changes. It'sgot to be one of the greatest pop albums of all time. I lovethat album, every single song. And he's such a mean we think aboutthat, that kid, and what he's been his life so far and whathe's done. I have a lot of respect for what he's been able tohe's held it together. I mean, you know, not the best,but given the circumstances, I think he's done pretty well and he's very talented, very I have to sneeze to excuse me. Thank you. What wouldthe name of a musical based on your life be? The Jewish Sax Playeron the roof? All right, wouldn't have a running yeah, okay,the worst, funniest on stage, mishap. Oh, well, I dropped myset I was in front of Tenzero people, or maybe even more,opening up for Barry man alone in Chicago. And so I had a this wasa few years ago and Barry's a good friend of mine asked me toopen up for him on a tour of the United States. So you know, of course I jumped at the opportunity. But here I am in front often or Fifteenzero screaming, very mental fans, not happy to see meat all. So and I was just for twenty five minutes. And soI'm trying my best to make it happen, saying his name. Barry's coming out. He'll beyond just a second, but you know he's not going tocome out any sooner, so we might as well have a good time.And I get so into it. There's one time when I did one ofthese moves with the saxophone my strap, because you hold the saxophone, saxophoneweighs like twenty pounds. It's a heavy thing to be around your neck allthe time. And I did one of these moves like this because I wasso exuberant, you know, trying to corral the energy of this people.The sacks fell off the the strap and flew twenty feet across the stage.There was a hush over the crowd going, you know, and they thought andI went to go get the saxophone. I was so scared because this ismy baby, you know, one thousand nine hundred and sixty three sellmermark six baby. And of course I looked at it and I knew thatit wouldn't play. So I switched to the other saxophone, the Alto thatI had there. Finished the song, finish the set and then a fewof my friends came back that were in Chicago for that show. They saidthat sack stunt is brilliant. Shield right.

I said no, I saxophone isgoing to go into emergency surgery. So it's like that point the rockstar where they just smash their guitars. Yeah, really do that with saxophonefor too good Dave, please tell everybody where you want them to find youand follow you on facebook, Dave Cos music, at Dave cose music,and it's Koz and you can find me on twitter there. On instagram it'smy full Lee Goole name, so it's David Stephen with a Ph, stephencause, and Dave Coscom is my website where you can. If you losetrack of any of that, you can find it. It all there atDave costcom and it's allatiful. We much for your you, guys, areso great. I love talking with you. I'm going to hold you to thatcocktail soon. Oh you better believe it, because it's going to bea night to remember, like they're gonna have to write like an HBO seriesbased on that night, the night o David's always a pleasure of speaking withyou. Thank you. Thank you so much. Enjoy the rest of COVIDand I hope to see you in person real soon. Always pleasure, buddy. Thank you so so much. See soon. Thank you. That hasbeen my chat with Dave case. You can read my indepth interview with himin our current issue of Metro source on new stands across the nation or atMetro sourcecom. And that's our episode. I'm your host and lead writer fromMetro Source Magazine, Alexander Rodriguez. You can follow me on Instagram at Alexanderson air. Until next time, stay true and do you boot. Thathas been another metro source mini like share, subscribe on your favorite podcast player andcheck out the latest issue of Metro Sports magazine on newstands or online atMetro sourcecom. Follow us on Facebook, instagram at natural source and on twitterat Metro course man. Until next time, he fast.

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