Emmy Nominee Scott Schofield: Hollywood's Trans Influencer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Scott Schofield is an award-winning actor, writer, and producer—a “trans influencer of Hollywood.” Making television history as the first openly transgender actor in Daytime television with a recurring role on CBS’s The Bold and the Beautiful, Schofield then became the first transgender man nominated for any acting Emmy, for the recurring role of “Max” on STUDIO CITY (Amazon Prime).

As a film actor, Scott received international critical acclaim for his lead role in the 2018 feature film THE CONDUCTOR (Splendid Films). His one man show special, Becoming a Man in 127 EASY Steps, premiered at the 2020 Tribeca Film Festival. He can most recently be seen in HBO Max docuseries Equal.  

Scott’s 3 solo performance pieces have toured major venues in the US and Europe, with the support of the National Performance Network and the Princess Grace Foundation. In addition to his solo shows, he has performed in theatre pieces across the world in prominent venues.  

Among other behind-the-scenes credits in film, TV and streaming, Scott consults for HBO’s EUPHORIA and consulted on The Craft.

We chat very candidly about the boom in Hollywood with LGBTQ actors coming out, how the gay community can continue to support the trans movement, the focus on trans women over trans men in Hollywood, the political future of our community, coming out as trans in early youth, consulting for Hollywood, and the future of Scott's film, Becoming A Man in 127 Easy Steps.  

This is metro source. Minis the official podcast to Metro source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favorite personalities from the lgbtq world and beyond. Quick, Fun and informative. It's metro source on the go, out in proud since one thousand nine hundred and ninety. Well, hello, this is Metro Source Mane's. I'm your host, US, lead writer for Petrol Sorts magazine and Avid podcaster with so much hot air in Hollywood. I love chatting with somebody who doesn't pull punches and who makes their opinion transparent. Scott Schofield is an award winning actor, writer and producer, a trans influencer of Hollywood, making television history as the first openly transgender actor in daytime television, with a recurring role on CBS as the bold and the beautiful. Also, he became the first transgender man nominated for any acting Emmy for the recording role of Max on studio city on Amazon Prime. As a film actor, a Scott has received international critical acclaim for his lead role in the two thousand and eighteen feature film the conductor and his one man special becoming a man in a hundred and twenty seven easy steps premiered at the two thousand and twenty triback of Film Festival and he can most recently be seen in Hbo Max's Docu Series Equal and his solo performance his three solo performance pieces have toured major venues in the US and Europe with the support of the National Performance Network and the Princess Grace Foundation. And among his many credits in TV, film and streaming, he consults for HBO's Euphor you and also consulted on the reboot of the craft. I have learned more about the Trans and acting community in one happy hour was Scott then I have in all my educational seminars and forums. Please welcome Mr Scott Scopefield Hay, everybody. Thank you, Alexander. That's such a I'm so honored by your and your thank you. I'm honored. We were just talking about I can't believe it's been so many years since we've known each other and the first time I was introduced you was we met what six or seven years ago at this point? Yeah, it was your big press push for you being on the bold and the beautiful, which of course, you know, making TV history. So we're just going to get to it and, like I said, I just love that you. You just don't put on airs. It's like, who've got time for that? So it's going to get right into it. I just have to know personally, after you know, knowing everything that you have been through in life and yet to go through, what's it like for you hearing the future president of the United States mention the Trans Community in his acceptance speech? I mean, I mean it's two thousand and twenty first of all, so way to be here, but suddenly, yeah, it's important. It's really important and and it's nice to finally be able to say, you know, thanks, that's really great, as opposed to please stop saying those things. They really, really hurt people. You know, there's been a boom of big name celebrities coming out as trans,...

...bisexual, nine non binary and gay. We haven't yet fully convinced the LGB of Trans Inclusion in our group. How do we start having the conversation with mainstream United States of how to include the Trans Community Into Society? And what can I do, as a gay, Latino Fabulous Man, do to help with the Trans Movement? You know, people, people don't realize that. The reason why we are the LGBT community is because of gender actually, and because we're all impacted, we're all oppressed by how what people think of gender. We live in a society where people say, if you're a man, then you have to be with a woman, and if you're a woman, you have to be with a man. That's Heterosexism. Right now, imagine if you are a woman who becomes a man or a man who becomes a woman, you're also not doing it right. Right, in the same way that heterosexist culture says if you're a man who wants to be with men, or a woman who wants to be with women, or someone who wants to be with both, you're not right. Does that make sense? So it's like we're oppressed for the same reason. It's because people who are even, you know, more mainstream, or rather more traditional, have decided that there's this way that we have to be and if you're not doing it, particularly with your gender, then you're not right. So the idea that led and I will say bisexuals get a lot of guff also, and so mosticles are, you know, are really actually very understanding of Trans People. I would say that it's lesbians and gays who are stuck in a binary way of thinking as well. And it doesn't make sense because it's sort of like hitting yourself in the face. Right you're you're oppressed for the same reason, so turning around and doing it to us makes no sense. Right well, and as the gate community always said, you know what, what I do in the bedroom doesn't affect you. You know, you should still support me. What's the same of the Trans Community? You know, we don't have to go through a gender journey or an identification journey and it really doesn't affect us to the point that we should try to to put it in a box or shut it away. It's about the person. It's not about what they have to go through. It's the same reasons that we want acceptance. Is the same reasons why anybody wants acceptance. And I want to talk about the the major milestones that you've had in your career, making Trans and television history not once, but twise. How has your career changed from those moments? Has there been a big shift? What's the biggest change in your career that you've seen from these milestones? You know, having, you know, having a really big historic television break back in two thousand and fifteen, brought me into the TV world. I and to TV and film and took me from I had a national, in actually international theater career for a long time before that. So it wasn't like I just like walked off the street right. It's just...

...right. I got it front of more people and and that's what happens every time. Every time there's like a big newsworthy thing, people start to see you right, and as a Transperson, as an actor, in sort of all of my most important identities being seen and people saying, Oh, I see I see your potential, I see what you can do. Right, that's all I need to keep moving on this path, and so I'm grateful for every every moment that happens and every door that that continues to open. You and I've and I have talked before very openly about this. Is there a popularity contest that Trans Women in Hollywood are winning over Trans men? You know, there seems to be this glamorization of some of the actresses that we love seeing in their gowns and you know, I believe that there's a bit of a popularity contest. Do you think actors like Elliott page coming out will kind of shift that focus so it's all inclusive, or do you even think it's a niche issue? Well, I mean, first of all, forty four trans women have been murdered this year. So the visibility that comes comes with a price, right, and I so I would really hesitate to say popularity context. Bill. I know where you're coming from. When you're friend what you're saying. See a lot more trans women then we see men. And Yes, part of that is the glamor, right. We love that, right. We Love Glamor, we love gowns, we love femininity until we don't, which is always really interesting. Right, the way that sexism and massage and he plays out isn't that interesting? Very interesting, right. And so you know, trans men and masculinity in general is less showy, right, and so I think that's that's one part of it. Right. People just think, okay, you're a dude now, and that's actually not the case. Right. Like Trans men, trand masculine people, we come with a much deeper story and we have so much to say about what it means to be a man. That's why I wrote the show becoming a man in a hundred and twenty seven easy steps. It's kind of a joke, you know what I mean? That if I an idea furniture base like it's like that. So so people are really sleeping on transmasculinity. They they really need to see the stories that we have to tell, and that's kind of my biggest mission, is like helping people see those stories, helping people see my community and realize what cool, exciting stories we have to bring. We are talking in our next issue of Metro source. We're talking with glad and I did more research. I was understanding what a pressure they've put on studios to have consultants from the LGBT community, which I know you've been doing in the last few years. What exactly does a consultant from our community do and what is Hollywood doing right automatically, and what are some of the mistakes that you'd see that as a consultant, you kind of have to educate Hollywood.

Yeah, so the reason why we have to have consultants is because we don't have, and particularly Trans Consultants Right we don't have trans people in the positions of power to tell the stories. So you know, I work with, for instance, a lot of CISGENDER writers who are trying to tell transgender stories and until such a time as transgender writers can get their stories made. Right now there are only two trans people who have had features, you know, big popular features, made in the last year. Right. So that the if you think about all of the writers for all of the film's right, that's a small number. So and really like artistry is artistry. We, you know, are you know it's complicated, but at the same time trans people have a really specific perspective and if you're not trans, you don't see it. You just can't, you just can't in the same way, like in a similar but different way that, like I can't write a black person story right. There are going to be things that I simply cannot see right and I accept that as a white person and I would rather hear a black person tell their story right, because it's important that they do that. So when someone brings me on as a trans consultant, I'm able to look and go, okay, here are the problems with your script, because you don't have that experience, you wouldn't know that these things do or don't happen. So I start there. Then we go into you know, go on to set I make sure that all the people are trained on the set so that everybody uses the correct pronouns for the actor right and make sure that they're taking care of them so that the actor can just come and just act, just be an actor and just shine right. And then we make sure too, that the director isn't like focusing on somebody's atoms, apple or hands right, doing these visual tropes right. That are the way that all of our history. If you watch the Netflix documentary disclosure, it shows you very clearly all of the stereotypes that Hollywood has created that to teach people how to see Trans People Right. So I go in there and I help them not make those problems. And what's amazing is that so many people really get this now and they're like, yes, we absolutely have to do this. I just got a call today. You know, we're writing a trans character into the script. Can you please check it and make sure that you know we're doing it right, and then can you come and do the rest of your work on the production? Yes, absolutely, there are. There is no problem with asking for help in this regard and it is the one place that we as a society right we're trying to build bridges and we're trying to make each other really a part of you know this, this, this, I'm doing this. You know what I mean, this connection that we all have right, yes, it. There are going to be things that you don't know. So ask somebody who does right, somebody WHO's profession it is to know who can help you. There's nothing wrong with that and it actually just makes a much better story. As you see, with you for it. People love you for you, they love the Trans Representation there. It's because Huntersche for herself has a lot to do with it and I back her up on that and make sure that what she's what she's bringing is really really showcase and highlighted...

...and enjoyed. You know, it's funny when we were having our first kind of conversations together, you know what I was saying is, you know, we don't have this wealth of transactors to pull from to tell these stories. There was the whole Scarlett Johnson, you know, controversy, and we can't say that anymore. We can't say now we don't have any highly visible transactors and that is such a difference of I think, even two years up until, you know, the summer covid has made a lot of actors spend time with themselves, so to speak, and then be honest about who they are and then kind of f the world. I need to live for myself and are coming out left and right. It's a I can't keep up with everything. It's wonderful as it's great. Yeah, they think about all of the actors who couldn't come out, like when we were kids, right, who couldn't come out because it would cost them their whole careers. And then when I find out that, like the mom on family ties, who my family watched all the time, was a lesbian, you know what I mean, like, what would that have done for me to know that so many of the stars that I was watching growing up were like me? Right, and now kids now don't have to go through that feeling of like why, you know, this sort of mine in a box, you know, feeling of like why do I feel so invisible? What am I what am I running up against here? Well, and it's part of that, and it's also the language is now being seen on on major television, on the big screen, so that families have this language to even have the conversation. When I was young and kind of having these sexual feelings. It was so in the closet, coming from a Latin family, coming from a conservative Catholic family, and there were no gay programs growing up, so we didn't even have that language and I thought, you know, it was some evil secret because I wasn't seen it displayed and I didn't even know how to put those feelings into words because I had never seen it to your point. So, but part of this representation is, you know, we're having conversations about gender identity and sexuality. Trans Youth seemed to be coming out younger and younger and supported by their parents. By the way, in relation to your own journey, do you think individual should wait to start the transition process? Is there a young that's too young? So this is one of those issues that sys people make up, right, it's called concern trolling and there's this whole there's a book about it, where they're trying to say that trans man or are, you know, lock up your daughters were coming for them. Okay, so this is actually not really a trans issue. This is sis people having feelings about things that they don't understand. Okay, I'm just, you know, I rember be real with you about this? Yeah, I was three years old and I knew that I was tramps. Okay, I knew that I was trans for my entire life and I there was no language, there weren't people that I could look at to find out. It took me until I was twenty to be able to find like, to be able to meet somebody like me who could help me understand my own story and then become the person I wanted to be. I spent I became clinically depressed that age eleven, I...

...went through puberty, suicidal, and all of that could have been halted, all of that could have been helped by people around me, grown ups around me, saying, and look, I'm not blaming anybody, because they didn't have the language either. Right, but kids today now have grown ups around them who can say, okay, this is probably what's going on for you. So how can we support you? How can we make sure you're not bullied? How can we make sure that you feel okay when this world is constantly doing this fire hose of what masculinity and Femini should be like, what you should look like and how you should act as a boy or a girl? Right, how can we keep you safe inside of that and know that who you are is what matters the most. Right. I'm not talking about any kind of hormones or surgery, which, by the way, it is just so you know. It is actually not very easy at all for a minor to get hormones and especially not to have surgery. But I tell you what, I'd rather have a kid who transitions then a dead kid, and that is how serious this is. So I need sist people to stop having opinions about it and start thinking about the children who are actually killing themselves at a rate much higher. Okay, then, lesbian our gay kids do all right, and I need you to start having compassion and going well, maybe we could be supportive rather than being a child's first bully. That's the reality of the situation that people need to really take to heart. You know. That's what I got to say about it. You know, and it is kind of true. It's just like whatever kind of fear we can put on. I you know, with this whole political bullshit been through, I had a conversation from somebody from high school that I had no clue was so conservative. Should I know, I'm coming from OC and we were talking about same sex marriage and they related it to somebody going after their kids in the bathroom because they allow transgender people into a bathroom. Number one, that was even part of the conversation we were having. Number two, that's where they were equating the LGBT Equality Movement to. Was that instance between know, that is the most bullshit thing I've ever heard brought up. You're talking about a pedophile, number one. You're not even talking about gender identity issues and it's not even it's so ridiculous in my mind that that conversation went there and so I didn't have the energy, unfortunately, to try to even educate because at that point it was it was so ridiculous to me. But I want to talk about your film. Becoming a man in a hundred twenty seven steps are easy steps, so we know, and hill the film festivals it, but we're in stupid covid so you didn't actually get to see it on the big screen. That has got to be so frustrating on so many levels because I know how many years this project it's literally your life's work, like literally your life's work. Tell tell our audience what the film is about and tell me what you kind of want the future of this film to because it kind of had...

...like a like a false party. Yeah, well, I mean, I mean it's wonderful. We got into Rebecca, we got into outfast, we had people loved it, we got great reviews, so that's all good. Now we're in the process of getting distribution so that it can come to a screen near you. The project is it's a one man show, special like you're kind of used to, but it's again pushing the boundaries and it's a little different. We took live footage of me in front of an audience, but we also did some experimental and cool stuff inside of a studio, because every single one of the stories of the one hundred and twenty seven stories in this project has like a different feel and a different voice, if you will, and every person is made up of a multiplicity of stories, right. You have great stories and hard stories and funny stories and, you know, ridiculous stories, and that's all part of who you are. So in one hour we kind of put together and sort of audience favorites and just the the strongest stories that really look at what it means to become a man, right, and what that can mean, and it just sort of blows the top off the one man show, special genre and also everything that I think you know about being a man. So I hope you get to see it. You will well, it's coming out besee good. So a hundred and twenty seven easy steps. What if we were to kind of, you know, put this on the step level? What was the hardest step and what was the easiest step? So the hardest step was, as I said, you know, I grew up with no language around this, and so the hardest step was just going, Oh, this is what I am. People want to tell you that you're mentally ill, that your attention seeking, that you know there's some something else wrong with you, when really, like, nature is diverse and gender is diverse and there have always been people like me in every culture across all history and time. So it's really just like a very simple answer, right. So like just getting the simplest answer that like, Oh, I am what I knew myself to be at age three and now I'm going to live my life. That was the hardest part. The easiest part comes from that first step, right, as soon as you accept yourself and just say you know what, you can have your opinion that's fine, but it actually doesn't change the fact that I'm sitting here in front of you having this life right. Once you have that kind of confidence, you can move into the rest of your life as the person that you are and just have those experiences, all of those amazing experiences that make you who you are. What I love about this boom of representation and access to education and knowledge is that we are on covering figures from history, figures from Hollywood, that are gay trans, and now we're able to kind of share their stories, which I love Hbo Max's Docu Series. Equal, we're in your youth.

Would you ever imagine that you, as a trans man, would be playing a gay man for a major cable network telling these stories? I mean, even ten years ago that would have been like now, now, no, no, no, no, now. That must have been somewhat surreal kind of filming that. Thinking about the circle that it, that that experience was, it's wonderful and I mean I will say even now it's still hard for people to look at me for for SIS gender roles. I mean I still have to I have to tell people I'm trans for them to know that I am but in the acting world because right, you know, they're like, oh, I don't know, I can't see it. So you know, it was it was a nice, nice thing, and it happened because I look like Craig Walk Craig Rodwell. My hair is much longer robbit at the time, you know, a covid hair. At the time. I looked a lot like Craig Rodwell and they said, okay, he can act, he's got you know, he can do this part. I actually auditioned for the role that feud main played, which was a non binary trans character. That was the role that I was asked to audition for, but when they were looking at it, they're like, he looks like cred rod while he he should totally play him. And Sir, thankfully, you know, as a as an intelligent bunch of producers, I mean HBO is a wonderful place for thinking people and the whole production crew is Lgbtq and they realized right, if we're doing the work of expansive representation, let's just go ahead and do it. You know, I didn't turn it off. Now, is this the conversation that you have to keep having with, let's say your agent or manager? Like put me in front. I you know, I want to be put in front of all roles. Is that something you constantly have to say, or is like what's coming to most as an actor right now? Well, it's less that. You know, my representation really gets it, and there they get that I can play, I'm an actor, I can play a role right, and that my gender. Actually, you know, people get all confused because they're the whole transgender actors and transgender roles thing. That's because transgender actors weren't being invited to participate in transgender roles. Okay, it's about it's about workplace equality if we want to bring it down to that level. So you know, at this point we're trying to move forward. The next step is if transactors can place this people, then yes, we're much closer to the role, to the the place where we can all play whatever roles right, but you have to get to that equality first and we're not there yet. My team understands I'm an actor, I can act, let's just go forward. But then they run into and have to do education with casting directors, with directors, with producers, with financiers, with distributors, right, all of these layers and layers of people who still have to be educated to understand that it's really about what an actor brings to the role, right, in an equal way. Right, this is this is what...

...we meant from the beginning. Does that make sense, about actors just being actors? Yeah, yeah, that's that's exactly right. You know, we were talking before we start recording about how we're just kind of tired. You know, this year has been difficult for anybody on any level. But then we've had to fight what's happening socially politically, way back from the blow protest to current presidency to just what happened this last week. And then we had pride season and that I know that you did a lot of digital pride stuff because that's kind of what's expected when you're, you know, a trailblazer. But they're also comes at time where you must feel you know, every interview you give is going to talk about LGBT issues, they're going to talk about your making history, they're going to talk about what your opinions are. Does that just kind of get a little exhausting? It's like you always have to be on, you always to have your facts. You kind of know what the conversation is going to be about, or kind of circle about, and then we have to deal with covid and then we have to deal with yeah, you still have to audition, you still have to make money, you still have to film stuff. This last year must have been pretty damn exhausting for you. How do you work that through? I call it activists fatigue. How do you work through that and breathe, because it's not easy. Well, you know, I'm still a white person. I still you know what I mean, for as hard as it is for me and and you know, you bring up a lot of different pieces, right like. Certainly I wish that we could have deeper conversations. I wish I didn't have to answer the same five questions about what it is to be transgender, but I did sign up for that. Right like, I am open and I will talk about it because I do want us all to collectively move forward, and we don't all move forward until we all move forward. Right. So, you know I'm invested in that and that is part of what I'm here to do. But you know, I am a white person who has all kinds of privilege. I have the privilege of having breast support me and talk about me and be able to talk about transgender issues in the news. Right I'm safe and comfortable at home. I not living with an abusive partner or an abusive family right, like there are. This time has really shown me all of the privileges that I do have and it's become my fuel for using that privilege, all of the many privileges that I have, to stand in solidarity with black lives matter, you know what I mean, with with all of the people who are impacted and who don't, you know, even Queer Youth Right, who don't have the power or the empowerment that I do. Right, empowerment is privilege, right, and I have that. So I'm going to use it and I'm going to, you know, share, because, again, we don't all move forward until we all move forward. So I love that. Yeah, that's been really really love that. Okay, all right, you know, we could talk and talk and talk, because there's...

...so many issues going on right now and it's like, but I feel that kind of energy. It's like we've talked so much and there's still so much more to talk about and unfortunately, we see how much more our nation needs to be educated on so many different issues and the struggle is still real. You know, we we're looking at this new presidency like everything is going to change overnight, and what we've seen from the actions of millions of our citizens is we're not even we're not even close to people understanding the war is definitely not over. It's just beginning and unfortunately, I think a lot of our youth and a lot of our community members are going to be caught in the crossfire, and so we have to continue having these conversations. You know, I was I was surprised by how many of our community were not atally involved, didn't want to make a stance on their social media and not say that you need to be pressured to do something you don't want to do, but now's the time to come forward. Yeah, I mean, you know, I'm a big believer in solidarity. And when you do that, your assist gender gay man. Right, you could go have your part totally. You were day, you could completely ignore transgender issues, but you're in solidarity. You Use your platform to share my story. Right, like you, you do what you can do where you are, with what you have. Right. Not Everybody is cut out to be a raw rock activist. Right. Yeah, everybody can make the decision to be in solidarity with other people and to say I know what's right and what's wrong. I'm going to make sure that you know that I'm on your side right, and that is what we need more than anything at this moment. We need to know, you know that we're together on this right that that it can seem overwhelming, but you know, we have to remember that like q and on and all of these really out there folks, they're actually a very small number of people with a very big microphone, right. And so the more that we remind each other, Hey, I'm on your side, I got your back across whatever difference is that we have with one another, and if we just take start where we are, with what we have, and help others from there. You don't have to go out holding signs, you don't even have to put it on social media because honestly, just putting it on social media and not doing any thing else is just at the foot side of that. Yeah, you want, I mean it's not you are with what you have and just you know what's good. We are all very clear on what is right and what is wrong right now. So do the right thing, that's it. No matter what you do, we're in a field of shit. Everybody, pick up your shovels and dig where you are. You know what I mean? Yeah, and I think part of that too, is what you touched on earlier, is, you know, asking the questions. Like I very candily, I learned more from you and are in our time and our early time together, because you were like you can ask me anything, there's no dumb question, and it's like, well, you know, we're so afraid to ask something that's going to be politically incorrecct. We're so afraid to offend people.

But at the same time, if we're not asking certain questions and if those questions are not being received on a positive note, then we don't learn. And so I've learned so much about you because you let me ask stupid, ridiculous questions, and now I'm a more informed person and I feel part of the fight because I understand. But I had to ask the dumb questions because we're still not asking the right questions, we're still not answering the right questions because, you know, we're so afraid to offend people. Absolutely, I will say not everybody is like me right some people just want to live their lives and not talk about it. Right. So, but the thing is there are so many people like me all over social media, right, so you can educate yourself. Sometimes people ask me questions online and I just write them back, here's a link where you can find it, and I send them to Google. Do you know what I mean? Because it's like so, yeah, but you do have to educate yourself. Sometimes you get lucky and you have someone in your life who's really willing to give you their perspective, and it's always just one person's perspective, right. I am more of an expert, right. I have a broader vision of things and a broader education on things, so I can tell you not just my perspective but a kind of more academic and and experienced perspective. But you know, if you don't have that person in your life, you can find that person on instagram right now. You know what I mean? Not Me, but all kinds of folks. Right, go listen to peppermint. Okay, I love peppermint. Go listen to the liver and Cox. I don't we have peppermint. Is Amazing. Go from the Field Germain, you know, go there are so many people that you could be listening to right now who can give you such a broad and deep perspective on any of the issues right. So just go find them. Have Fun. This is benefit and there's great programming out there, from from documentaries to two shows about some of these things. You know how we're just like, Oh my God, did you see the last episode of Bridgerton? Why don't we start saying yes, and did you see this documentary it? And for me like this, it's just as cool. Right, exactly one hundred percent. If I had to say I want, if everyone watching will please go to Netflix and watch the documentary disclosure. That would be an amazing homework for you to do. You learn so much about transgender people in media and how you've been taught to see transgender people wrong over time and how to start moving forward in a different direction. That's the one. It is two hours Max out of your life and it will teach you so much. Go Watch disclosure. Our interview with Jeremy Black Love from glad. He's the director of entertainment media. He picked that. I asked him what's the top project that we should be proudest of from the LGBT community and that would that was his choice. Okay, are you really play a little rapid fire? Okay, I only have five percent left. Let's go. Oh, okay, what would your political slogan be? Love, don't Hey. Okay, what action film would you have cast yourself in? Any...

...action film from all of Hollywood history? Predator word or phrase you'th by or in description of Lgbtq community. That just it's your biggest pet peeve. You like no idiot lifestyle. Yeah, Oh, yes, yes, yes, yes. What would your American idol og Christian Song be? Because of you? Okay, and what would your drag name be? Mason Dixon. I'm gonna steal that from my grand a profile. They tell everybody out where they can find you. Would follow you? And and what piece of your work do you want them to watch the most? I am on all the social media's. It says right up here at Turner Scofield, find me, follow me. Thank you. You can also follow my project becoming a man, and one hundred and twenty seven easy steps on instagram and facebook. Look it up and yeah, watch studio city when it comes. Watch becoming a man in a hundred and twenty seven easy steps. And if you are outside of the United States, because the US is sleeping on this movie, you can watch an amazing film called the conductor and you will know it. Yes, yes, I want to love it. You know I always love talking with you. Congratulations and all your success and congratulations are your anniversary, by the way. I don't think love and positive energy your way. Thank you so much. Right back at you. Thanks so much. All right, that has been my chat with Scottscho field. You can read my in depth interview with him in our current issue of Metro source, on news stands across the nation or at Metro sourcecom. And that's your episode. I'm your host, Alexander Rodriguez. You can find me on Instagram at Alexander is on air. Until next time, stay true and do you bow. That has been another metro source mini like share. Subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latest issue of Metro Sports magazine on newstands or online at Metro sportscom. Follow us on Facebook, instagram at natural source and on twitter at Metro Spurt mad until next time. They Tas.

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