Country Music Artist Ty Herndon Chats Mental Health & Sobriety

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Metal health awareness and open talk about addiction within the celebrity circle, as well as the LGBTRQ circle, has only come to the forefront in the last few years. With COVID being a major player in the progression of depression and addiction, we are now sharing our stories. Entertainer Ty Herndon shared last year’s relapse publicly, in hopes that others would learn from his journey. He has become empowered by getting back on his sober journey with new music and a podcast.

On this episode, we chat about Ty’s relapse, setting boundaries, what keeps him going, his relationship with religion, coming out as bipolar, his sober creative process, other LGBTQ trailblazers in country music, his personal mantra, life after coming out, his proudest moment of his career, his wish for the LGBTQ community, and, on a lighter note, getting back into the dating world….with host Alexander Rodriguez.

Country music artist Ty Herndon burst onto the scene and made his chart debut in 1995 with "What Mattered Most," which became his first No. 1 song and garnered a Song of the Year award. It was also the title track to his first album, which debuted on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart and had the biggest first-week shipment in the history of Epic Records Nashville. Between 1995 and 2002, Herndon charted 17 singles. In 2014, Herndon became the first major male country artist to publicly come out as gay in an exclusive with People magazine. He received an outpouring of support that only strengthened his relationship with fans and the country music community, expanding his reach to new and diverse audiences. Shortly after, he made history when he hosted a first-of-its-kind country music event, The Concert for Love and Acceptance, now an annual event that provides a stage for LGBTQ and allied artists. In 2020, he created the Foundation For Love & Acceptance to further his work on behalf of LGBTQ youth. Herndon found himself back at No. 1 in 2020 — this time on iTunes with his remake of "Orphans of God," a collaboration with Kristin Chenoweth and Paul Cardall featured on his holiday release, Regifted. Over the last year, he has been working on the new album, JACOB, his first of all-new music since 2016's House On Fire. In addition to his own foundation, Herndon lends his time and talent to MusiCares, which has supported Herndon through his struggles and supports those in the music industry with a safety net of services. Most recently, Ty launched a new podcast titled SOUNDBOARD. The long-form podcast features conversations with high-profile artists discussing their struggles and wins along their mental fitness journeys - guests include LeAnn Rimes, Michael Ray, Crystal Lewis, and more!

Check out Ty’s cover interview for Metrosource on newsstands around the nation or at Metrosource.com

This is metro Source minis the official podcast to Metro Source magazine and home of short form interviews with your favorite personalities from the lgbt Q world and beyond. Quick, fun and informative. It's Metro Source on the go out in proud since Hello, This is Metro Source Minis. I'm your host Alexander Rodriguez, writer for Metro Source and Queen of the podcast. Mental health, awareness and open talk about addiction within the celebrity circle as well as the lgbt Q circle has only come to the forefront in the last few years. With COVID being a major player in the progression of depression and addiction. We are now sharing our stories. Entertainer ty Herndon shared last year's relapse publicly and hopes that others would learn from his journey. He has become empowered by getting back on his sober journey with new music and a podcast. Country music artist Tie Herdon broke into the scene and made his chart debut in ninety nine D five with What Mattered Most, which became his first number one song and garnered a Song of the Year award. It was also the title track to his first album, which debuted on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and had the biggest first week shipment in the history of Epic Records Nashville. Between two thousand two he charted seventeen singles, and in two thousand fourteen, he became the first major country artist to publicly come out as gay and exclusive with People Magazine. He received an outpouring of support that only strengthened his relationship with fans and the country music community, expanding his reach to new and diverse audiences. Shortly after, he made history when he hosted a first of its kind country music event called the Concert for Love and Extemptance, which is now an annual event that provides the states for lgbt Q and allied artist and in two thousand twenty, he created the Foundation for Love and Acceptance to further his work on behalf of lgbt Q Youth. Herndon found himself back at number one in two thousand twenty, this time on iTunes with his remake of Orphans of God, a collaboration with sin Chenna with and Paul Cardell featured on his holiday release re Gifted, and over the last year he has been working on the new album Jacob, his first of all new music since two thousand Sixteens House on Fire. In addition to his own foundation, he lends his time and talent to Music Cares, which has supported Herden through his struggles and supports those in the music industry with a safety net of services. And most recently, he launched a new podcast titled Soundboard, a long form podcast featuring conversations with high profile artists discussing their struggles and wins along with their mental fitness journeys. Guests Includely and Rhymes, Michael Ray, Crystal Lewis, and many more. Please welcome our current Metro source cover boy, Tye hurdon Okay, So I have to tell you. When I told people, Hey, Tye started a podcast, most people are like, oh, great, a music podcast, and I'm like, well, no, not really. It's about mental health. UM and mental health is something that we just never talked about before, as much as we have in the last few years. I know, growing up UM in a conservative home,...

...never talked about it. Even when I came out in our circle of gays, nobody ever talked about mental health, and it's still a hard issue to tackle. What was that spark, What was that moment that made you think, yeah, let's do sound board. Um, and let's talk about mental health. My journey man, I I you know, I discovered healing, and I discovered um, uh you know, trauma work. And I discovered that recovery and mental health wellness is really the magic kingdom. I'm tall enough for all the rides I I'm doing. I'm prospering, you know. And and and um, I was able to get down to the bottom of um my mental health. Uh just finding out that fifty nine years old that I was managed by polar I mean just um, not even low grade. It just never crossed my mind. And um, you know I knew that, I knew that I knew some of the things. But uh, you know, trauma will is it? In your mental health situation can be like tar and feathers. It could be like layers and layers of tar, and it takes a lot of work to break that up, and it takes wellness and there's freedom on the other side of that. So I wanted to do soundboard and talk to other artists that have been on some journeys, maybe not exactly like mine, but just their own personal journeys of wellness and what they do to turn up the positive voices and and and keep those negative voices at bay, you know. And this is almost like another coming out for you. You know, you came out recently and you talked about your relapse. You also talked about being diagnosed as as as bipolar. And it must be so difficult to have to go through this in the public eye and then discuss it. You know, isn't that kind of a trigger over and over having to keep talking about what you've gone through this last year. I think that has been so many years not talking about it that it's a pleasure to talk about it. So quite honestly, I have a lot of pride because we're getting T shirts printed up right now because I want to kind of change this whole face of you know, if you're if you have some some mental things going on that you're broken, if you're in if you're in treatment or been a treatment off, you're sober that that you're you're damaged. So I mean, first T shirt we're putting out the sober across the front and on the back it says, and I'm fun damn it. Well, you know, uh, this last Pride season a lot of um, a lot of emphasis was placed on sober pride, which it really has not been in the past. It's like, how does how does a gay man contribute in the LGBTQ community when it's so heavy with nightlife, you know, and then on top of that, you're in the entertainment industry with you know, uh after concert parties and you know your groupie is coming and wanting to party. I mean, that must be difficult to deal with. Two, I have become the king of mocktails. Um. I don't do red bulls and stuff because that keeps me up for three days. But you know I have I have, Um, I have some pretty good boundaries, he says, which is a word I couldn't even spell before. So any of my stuff that I have to do is it's not late night, um it, it's you know,...

I'll do it before and some you know, Hey, I went to a direction then I stayed out to one o'clock in the morning. I was so proud of myself. But I just it's it's a it's it's just a a mental thing that you're gonna you know, you're gonna go out. You know you're gonna be around, uh, partying and drinking and stuff, and you just gotta know you're okay. You know, it's it's a part of the new foundation that that's in your magic kingdom. Want Yeah, And I want to talk about how it connects with your fans. You know, your original coming out, you know, almost a decade ago ago by the way, um, but the original coming out publicly, you had all this you know, opportunity to lose all your fans and now coming out again with really talking about your mental health. It's like, do your fans want to know all that about you? Is there a fear that hey, you know, they might they might pack up and leave. Man, the fans want music. And we spent oh my gosh, almost a year a little bit over a year on this music. And you know, when I went into uh UM to treatment this this this time after the relapse, I pretty much had said, you know, I'm kind of I've got a legacy in music, I'm kind of done. Now I'm gonna I'm gonna do something else. And I um, third day sitting down with my spiritual advisor at j Flywer's Institute, a spiritual If I was your named Clint, he said, we had a cup of coffee and he said, hey man. He goes, you know, I know you're spiritual. She said, you're a god guy, right, I said, yeah, yeah, pretty much. He said, you know the story about Jacob And I said, yeah, you're gonna tell me the story of Jacob. I said, yes, I know the story. He said, that's totally you man. He goes, you've been crippled, you got some scars. Now it's time to go out and your and be a leader in your tribe. And with those few words, it hit me like the old Pentecostal belt. It's like, my next record is gonna be called Jacob, and it's going to be all about my scars and my failures and my successes. And the very thing that I've run from my whole life is in is sitting center stage. And I never thought that would be possible, but through wellness it was and the greatest music in my life, and it's the that's the answer your question. The fans are loving the new music and it's it's it's the most authentic thing I've ever done. Well, I'll tell you. Right before I went to bed last night, around midnight, I watched UM, you know God or the Gun, which um, which was pretty powerful, I have to say. And this ties into you know, to Jacob, you know, it's it's a bit biblical in the theme. Just like you mentioned. I don't know you got started singing in you know, in church choir as a kid. That was you know kind of of how you got in through it. Um. I want to know. I also know what religion can do to us gay boys, and so I want to know what is your relationship with religion or with spirituality, because obviously it's become a big part of your recovery. I don't do religion anymore.

I think it's I think it's silly. Um. And when I when I counsel with kids today, I'm like, look, God's a cool guy. He they them. Whatever your higher power, your spirituality is in you, you will find it in this life. I promise you that. Uh, you know, God should be mad at us for what we've done to done to that situation, because that's that's a that's all love, and that's wonderful stuff, and the rest of it has been placed by some bad teachings. So I sit on the tailgate in my truck and talk to God. I call it God. Um, it's a good energy. I also get barefooted every morning, put my feet in the grass and fill the earth's energy. And what kind of goodness it has for me in this day and helped me through it. Um, I think, uh, one of the worst things that and the LGBTQ community with kids think they're broken, and they think that they're worthless, and they think that something happened that made them bad and that had nothing to do with God, and it had everything to do with some broken families. So one thing I love about us in the gay community, we can build our own families and I love spreading that gospel. So you know, I'll be honest with you. I had to stop him from a couple of my sponsor started calling me mother. I'm like, you will not call me mother, you and you will not call me father. You will call me Mr. Herndon. UM. So let's talk about the creative process for Jacob. You know you've been making music professionally, uh since you were with the Tennessee River Boys. Um. And I'm sure your process has changed from album to album, but specifically, how is your creative process different for this album? Well, we've done kind of organic albums the last five because I haven't been on a major record label in a while. And then right in the middle of writing this record, you know, the universe said here, Mr Herndon, Mr Tyrone, Uh, We're gonna give your a record deal, right, And I'm like, wait a minute, that's a lot of work. And I was so thrilled. And and my record label is owned by one of the leading mental health companies on the planet, so that was a good fit. Um, they loved the music, and UM the process changed rout. In the middle of recording the album, I was just kind of doing our coffeehouse stuff like we normally do. UM, and then all of a sudden I needed a radio single. I'm like a radio single. All of a sudden, I found myself playing in Napa Valley for the National Radio Convention and uh, the same week I found out that and Google says in two thousand and four team that I died, and so so it was so great to be a Napa Valley talking to the radio folks. I said, I want to let you guys all know that it wasn't me that died. It was my career. Big laugh. It was great. UM played some of the new song O the Uh. Currently we're number fifty one...

...on the Music Rowth chart with Until You Get There, which is kind of cool. But all those guys are still fun and the same. And uh, I just I just draw the line at six am radio calls. I just can't do it. Um. You know, you talked about being broken, and I want to talk about you know, when we talk about mental health, there's also that idea that somebody has broken like you said, UM, and being diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Can you share with us how it's not a death sentence, so to speak, and there are ways to live with it, um, And how do you live with bipolar disorder? I think anytime we find out we get a diagnosis with something that's making our life bad, that's a success story. So I think you have to find your own journey with it. I know, I know I did, UM, And then right in the middle of it, I got COVID for the second time and it knocked my bipolar mat out, so I had to get on another one. So I'm like, come on, universe, UM, that's a great question. I think on our journeys with our mental health, nobody's just the same our den just like no no one person is the same, and we there's so many resources out there to help you figure out, um, how med's gonna work for you, and you know, and sometimes for me it was just getting the med adjusted that it would just right a little too much. Look too, it's amazing to me these meds, how they can really mess with it. They're too much and they're too little. So finding a balance with if you're on a med and then also knowing what other meds you're on, because I think especially for people in recovery, you know, you've got to find a real good balance that that works for you and it's gonna work for you in the long run. So there's so there's a wealth of information out there about that. So I was really fortunate to have some great teachers and counselors that helped me with that. Now I know there are a number of entertainers that say that they've not been able to incorporate medication into their life, for you know, they continue you down passive addiction because they feel that their numb as a performer, if they don't perform the way that they used to, if they don't write music that the way that they used to, And people are very scared of kind of taking that leap and rediscovering music, um in sobriety or taking the meds that they need to man. You know, I always say that you just gotta tear that town down because it's not serving you. There. I think, I think being balanced, you'll you'll learn new habits because for me, I was very surprised after doing all this trauma work, it was very little about drugs and alcohol that yeah, there we're back, We're back. That that silenced the lambs that you know that that that the flat of the bumble bee stopped and I could function better. I'm a better songwriter, I'm a better everything and um certainly a better business. So I think, see it's the oh story. I...

...write great songs for smoking pot. Well, you try rotten a song without it, so you know, get real with yourself. That's the that's the number one thing. Um. You've been a musician, you've acted so to speak, in your music videos, you've posted events, but podcasting it's a whole different beast. What has been some of your biggest personal challenges in becoming a podcast host? Stop talking so much? I noticed with thank it was with my friendly and rhymes. I was like the first ten minutes that I'm just talking my ass off and if she probably got a word in edgewise. And then you know, towards the last you really got to open up. And I think and then with Michael Ray, I didn't talk enough. So just finding the balance of conversation, um, and letting people talk, because um, I think if you're on a podcast, you want to tell your story and and to not interrupt, and and to find the and to find perfect comma. What has been a stand that moment for you in in recording these episodes? Wow? Um, the energy from my friends because right now it's just my friends that are on and they're just like, wow, we can talk about this. I'm like, hey, yeah, man, we sure can. I mean, and just you know, one of my good friends is Crystal Lewis, was a huge contemporary Christian fan back you know, in the in the nineties, and I mean like like great like Tori uh I am as, they all love her. I've got some really cool guests coming up. I want people on that I really had a story. Yeum, Crystal Lewis got to talk about some very difficult things and she did it so beautifully because she'd never got to talk about it before. Um, I felt that way with the People magazine article. It's four pages of sitting on my dinner room table, and I looked at us, like, that's thirty years of my life and I just got lost it. Um. And then I always telling people go listen to the podcast to get the whole story. But that's the first time I've got to talk into my story with my words. Uh, to own my ship and to set the records stright. So we all need that, and especially if you're living your life under a microscope. And I think it's a refreshing for people to see that celebrities do suffer from mental health. They deal with, you know, the problems that you know that that quote unquote regular people to deal with. Yeah, you know, well, we we have the regular stuff too. We have to we have two rooms with that. You know, you just gotta know which room you're in. I'm a big analogy guy because my sponsor is that as well. UM, and I always like to say, you know, I had to tear the town down. I burned it down, and I did that really well. Uh, burned down quite a few towns. But the cool part about this is this mental health again. Um, we may burn it down. What lies on the ground are the lessons. You don't you don't,...

...you don't wipe away the foundation. You can build a brand new building there. And you've got that strong foundation. So I've got a whole brand new town. And I was to say, you know, there's there's a bar in it. We don't. We don't have any drug dealers. We gotta we gotta jail. We gotta jail sits out outside of the town. Um. And I tell my sponsors, I'm like, look, you gotta name this is a good thing. You gotta name your disease. Man, you gotta name your poison. You give Mama dousa. So Maddasa lives in the jail outside of town, and you know, I I gotta I go out there every day and you know, tell her how ugly she is and she ain't getting out and you know it's the thing you talked to it. And I always say that. And then you build another room, build rooms in your life that feels safe to you. And um and boundaries, UM, they're they're very important to know what works for you and if you're in recovery, know your road to relapse. They're printed on a big piece of paper and by my front door, and they you know, they can they grow and they morph, and I'm just I'm learning to be an adult now for the first time I've grown up thinking adults at you know here, I'm I'm thirty one years old and I just, you know, yeah, right, girl, you look good. Though everybody's like, what he can't be no feel good. It's like it's crazy. Yeah yeah, if you're gay and you turned the Big six though, it's like cancer. Like I'm single. Day I'm trying to date. I'm like, yeah, okay, I'm not supposed to lie, but I'm really afforded to. Um, please tell me that you're writing a self health book. By the way, every everything you're saying it's golden. I'm just like trying to write it. The great thing about being with that, you know, working with the mental health company, is I've got um a book. Um, we're gonna start with that, just my story, and then I think that book, my own book would be underself help. I don't know, man, if I take it one day at a time, there's just there's my manager sitting in here, and it's just, you know, it's nice to have the phones, ringing it's nice to I'll be doing work that matters, doing music that matters, and and seeing people coming out to the shows and just having great conversations. Well, let's talk about your coming out in People magazine. Um, like I said almost a decade ago, we are in the current boom that people are coming out left and right, and it's easy to forget how hard it was, how dangerou was dangerous it was to both career physically, family wise, friendship wise, to come out in such a big way. What strikes you the most when you think back to that time when you came out. You know that I spent a year and just just just putting my mental health together for that. Um, we're talking to people that have done it before. Shelley right, Um and Shelly right first. I talked to right she...

...us in country music, and she she was really the first, and Um, she was so brave and she's been my friend for years and she made it better for me and I and I lift her up for that. Um. But I hear people say, oh, man, how do you gotta come out? I'm like, well, it's like air to me. It's the truth. You've got to you have to know the truth. I have to be authentic, um, and I've never been afforded that quality. So here's the deal. You know, I came out. That was a piece of the pie for me. There was there was more that there was more tar and feather. You know. I hate to say that being gay was it was like a big piece of tar. But it was because I didn't get to do it with freedom. And so there was too many secrets. There was too many relationships that had to stay hidden. And that alone is trauma. And oh man, UM, I just I just honor the fact that someone is you know, with Billy Gilm when your Billy just he pushed the button button that morning and said tie and Billy was twelve years old. The same record lebels me and I remember you're holding this kid's hand crossing the street on radio tours. And we've been we've been friends over the years. And um, this is the perfect example. Um. The day that I came out, he was he gave him courage to push the button on his dude to say I'm gay too, and and I honored that. But I also tell him, I said, hey, I'm gonna send you a bill for ten thousand dollars. No, because I'll tell you why. Because all of a sudden there were two of us and that was rocket fuel and it was a really cute story. Um. So I could not live in a career anymore that my blood and bones did not feel welcome in my own body. So I think a lot of people feel that way when they feel they need to come out because they're living a lie. And you finally get to a place that you're brave enough to go, Okay, I've got a look around me. I've got plenty of friends not gonna go away from me. I've got if I'm gonna lose a family member that I'm gonna lose them, maybe they'll come back. Am I gonna lose my job? This is a really important question. Am I gonna lose my job? You gotta have your job. So, um, there's there's a lot of There's a lot that goes into it that people don't realize. I think, Um, it is um to me, it's a celebration and it's also a huge risk. But I think in anything that you do, if you're gonna take a risk and educate yourself and what the risk is, and and then my decision so sometimes you have to come out to the world and just come out to a few people that you know, we're gonna love you. So now for the most person, Yeah, no, I just I kind of think that the LGBTQ community is kind of the normal ones now, like everybody's coming out. It's like my grandma's coming out right. Um no. But but it's because of...

...trail little blazers like yourself that made that happen, especially in the country music genre. Now we know you know, uh members of the country. If you uh country music, your your fans followed you, the industry followed you, supported you for the most part. Do you still experience homophobia from your point of view in country music? Um? You know, just just some weird things like this like Jason al Dean's wats in the media rap you know, for making a stupid comment, and I just think we need to watch your mouths. I was like, be smart about your decisions again, um. I And seeing artists like Lily Rose, you just had her second number one And I heard on WSM radio the other day they're talking about Lily Rose weddings coming up and she's they're talking about she's marrying her her long girl, long time girlfriend. It was one of the five times in my life I had to put my truck over and used this about music. You know Bondie, to pull the truck over. Um, but that made me. I pulled my truck over just and just cried. It was a happy cry. But I'm like, would you listen to that? Yeah? I got to. I got to live to see it. See the day that they're talking about a gay wedding on country radio, and there are a lot. I mean, we have a company right now that I'm producing lgbt q X and some very great affirming straight acts as well. So I think it's a family and I think that's that's the new normal. And so Nashville has come a long ways. Um. Do we still have a little ways to go? Probably? You know, Um, but it's better. It's definitely better now. Till you, I I want to know, because you you brought up the whole al deane situation. Um, is it our Is it our job to call people out for the words that they're using? Is it our job to call them out? Is it our job to challenge them? Or do we just leave them alone and focus on us. I say, Mayor and Morse for presidents. What I say, she ain't playing man? She yeah, I loved I loved it. I was like, Okay, I probably couldn't say that because she she certainly did, And UM, no, I don't. I think it's definitely our job to say something. I think it's an evident injustice towards some some some precious thing is happening, and you have a responsibility too, especially if you have a platform. But I think there's a way to say it. I think there's a kindness. I think again, be educated in your words. Um, you know, think about something before you don't speak out of heat or anger. Um, just come from the facts and um, you know, we'll let Mary Morris do the rest. Um. Since you're coming out, every interview invariably discusses your sexuality. They talk about your coming out. This interview included obviously. Do you ever feel overshoutwed by your coming out, by your sexuality? Like you said, you know, this is a piece of the pie that's you, but that's not...

...the whole pie. Say it louder, it's my it's my theory. Because there's a fourteen year old kid out there needs to hear it. So now that's not I love it. Say it louder the new album by Time, Let's say it louder. What is one of your proudest moments from your career? Um? You know two parts, you know I have. I've been on the ground Old Opry seventeen times. Um, and it's time. You know it's come on, Opery. They need to have me. It's been it's been about ten years and you have me back on. We need to scream a little louder about that. But um, being on the ground Old Opry was the very first huge thing in my life and it still remains. I love walking on that stage. Um. Being honored by HRC was amazing. UM. But my proudest moment is my foundation. Is that the Yeah, the Foundation for Love and Acceptance, which we now are changing our mission statement a little bit too in clude UM a situation to that people can get detoxed and get you know, a chance for UH to help people that need to get sober. I absolutely love that so much. I think during COVID a lot of our community turned to substances to get us, to get us through the isolation. The depression. And UM I know this even personally from my circle of friends, some people weren't able to like leave that in COVID and and continue. Um, So I think that is so important. I I'm I'm a soldier and it happened to me, so you know, just there was it was scary. Um. I think I can tell you this the beginning of COVID, I need two people on my street. Um. And now people probably have overdone it because now they're like, see me coming, like Herndon, We're fine, We're fine locking their doors. Um. You have done so much for the lgbt Q community and beyond. Uh, what is your biggest wish or what do you want to see most happen to our community in the near future. Well, um, I would I would definitely want us to rise up and be together, that we keep our rights. Um that are you know, I think it's ridiculous that anybody's going after us for that. We can't be married. Um Uh. You know, I just think I think we need to work together. I think, Um, I know we all have opinions, we all do, but under that umbrella of opinions, we can find some common grounds to stand together. Because when we do that, Ain't nobody's gonna knock it down. They gotta go around us. So and um, I wish those words are mine. They were my grandmother's. She's I mean, my grandmother said, you put a thousand hearts on the tables. They're just a thousand hearts. They're not black white. Um, they're there, just a thousand hearts. And what do hearts do? Well? They create love? And I love that about my...

...grandmother. And you know I had I came from from from really strong women in my family. You know, my mom's really sick right now. So uh, you know, i've been, I've been, I've been getting to be really close to her, and we've been talking a lot. And she you know, I'm I'm gonna get emotional now because she uh, she sets son, she goes, I've lived for this day for you, she said, you know, um to see you happy. She goes into senior and then she turned around and said, you sure do talk a lot. Now here's the kicker, she said, And I believe you, it's amazing that that made me uh emotional too. Uma man um uh, So let's talk about so just briefly and then we'll wrap up so love and dating, love and dating is hard for anybody. Love and dating as a gay man, love and dating as a sober man. How are you getting back into the swing of things? Very badly? My my sponsor actually making me like, you know, Jesus, just going a safe date. And I'm like, what's the safe date? Because you know, just go to a movie with somebody. So uh, you know. I one thing about getting healthy is I kind of learned to be okay with just me. And I also believe I've always believed this. Um, I've been in a relationship since I was eighteen years old, in and out, in and out because I had to have that. I don't have to have it anymore, but it would be nice if I did. So it looked differently this time, Um, and it's I know that it's moving towards me, and I'm just gonna let it. Uh. Always been Herndon household. You know, it shows up when it walks in. So I have met some some nice guys. I've been on a few dates, but um, I've not found myself to be ready. So I'm I'm pretty good. I'm Matt and I'm still great friends. You know, I have to tell them to go home all the time, that there's food in his bridge and get out of mind. But we're you know, I'm just good. So um um. But you know, hey, if you're out there, you know and you like country music and you know you got all your teeth and hit me up. Wait do those skill go in the same sentence? I don't know. I'm just kidding. I don't even know. Okay, complete d mora. One final question, what is your message to your fans? My message to my fans. Number one, thank you, um, Number two, um, come on back at the shows because we need you. And number three on iTunes you can still...

...by the record it's hidden up there. Just go ahead and purchase it. You are man. I'm so grateful and I'm getting a lot of like a lot of new ones now. Um you know um that I know their their moms and dad's probably had my sets growing up, so it's kind of cool. I don't know how you do it, Like you know, you know your book. I can't wait for a book to come out. Your podcast is out, and I want your your skincare secrets like that needs to be a viral video on YouTube. You need like a beauty channel because everybody wants to know how you look the same damn age, no matter how old you are. You know, I pickled myself over the years. Any day the rubber band is gonna break and this is it's gonna be horrible. So I don't know what's gonna happen. Well, it's just stay tuned. Uh, Ti, thank you, thank you, thank you so much. As it always um such a pleasure to chat with him. Thank you for sharing your story, um, in so many different aspects of your life. UM. I think it's so so important, not just for our community but for everybody. And I know that takes a lot of courage. So you have a lot of people's hearts. I tell you you, you you definitely do. I love you man. Always great to talk to you. Thank you so much. All right, and I hope to see you live soon come to Los Angeles. I'm I'm working on it. I promise, good, good good. This has been my chat with Ti Hurting. You can read my in depth cover story with him and our current issue of Metro Source available news stands around the nation or at metro source dot com. And that's our episode. I'm your host and lead writer from Metro Source Alexander Rodriguez. You can follow me on Instagram at Alexander is on Air and until next time, stay true and do you boom? That has been another Metro Source Mini Like Shared and subscribe on your favorite podcast player and check out the latest issue of Metro Source magazine on newsstands or online at metro Source dot com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram at Metro Source and on Twitter at metro Source Mad. Until next time, A passages.

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